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  • Strait, George (American musician)

    George Strait, American country music singer, guitarist, and “new traditionalist,” known for reviving interest in the western swing and honky-tonk music of the 1930s and ’40s through his straightforward musical style and his unassuming right-off-the-ranch stage persona. He was among the most

  • Strait, George Harvey (American musician)

    George Strait, American country music singer, guitarist, and “new traditionalist,” known for reviving interest in the western swing and honky-tonk music of the 1930s and ’40s through his straightforward musical style and his unassuming right-off-the-ranch stage persona. He was among the most

  • Strait, the (strait, Arctic Ocean)

    Denmark Strait, channel partially within the Arctic Circle, lying between Greenland (west) and Iceland (east). About 180 miles (290 km) wide at its narrowest point, the strait extends southward for 300 miles (483 km) from the Greenland Sea to the open waters of the North Atlantic Ocean. The cold

  • Strait-Jacket (film by Castle [1964])

    William Castle: King of the Gimmick: …returned to shocking audiences with Strait-Jacket (1964), which starred Joan Crawford as an erstwhile ax murderer who fears that she is reverting to her old ways. The film, which was written by Robert Bloch, featured the tagline “Just keep saying to yourself: It’s only a movie…it’s only a movie…” Bloch…

  • Straits Convention of 1841 (Europe [1841])

    Treaty of Hünkar ?skelesi: …privileges when it signed the London Straits Convention of 1841.

  • Straits Question (European history)

    Straits Question, in European diplomacy of the 19th and 20th centuries, a recurrent controversy over restrictions on the passage of warships through the Bosporus, the Sea of Marmara, and the Dardanelles, the strategic straits connecting the Black Sea with the Aegean and Mediterranean seas. The

  • Straits Settlements (Asian history)

    Straits Settlements, former British crown colony on the Strait of Malacca, comprising four trade centres, Penang, Singapore, Malacca, and Labuan, established or taken over by the British East India Company. The British settlement at Penang was founded in 1786, at Singapore in 1819; Malacca,

  • Straits Times, The (Singaporean newspaper)

    The Straits Times, morning daily newspaper published in Singapore, generally recognized as one of the outstanding English-language papers of the Far East. It was founded in 1845 as a single-sheet weekly by Robert Carr Woods to provide commercial information needed by Singapore’s bustling port

  • Strajk (film by Schl?ndorff [2006])

    Volker Schl?ndorff: …subsequent films included Strajk (2006; Strike), about one of the founders of Poland’s Solidarity trade union, and the romantic drama Return to Montauk (2017).

  • strake (engineering)

    differential geometry: …can be illustrated by the strake, a spiraling strip often designed by engineers to give structural support to large metal cylinders such as smokestacks. A strake can be formed by cutting an annular strip (the region between two concentric circles) from a flat sheet of steel and then bending it…

  • Stralsund (Germany)

    Stralsund, city, Mecklenburg–West Pomerania Land (state), northeastern Germany. It is a Baltic Sea port on the Strelasund (strait) opposite Rügen island, with which it is connected by the Rügendamm, a road and rail embankment. There was a village that specialized in ferrying goods and passengers to

  • Str?lsund faience

    Str?lsund faience, tin-glazed earthenware made at Str?lsund, Swed. (now Stralsund, Ger.), from around 1755 to 1792. The factory was founded by Johann Ulrich Giese, who leased it to Johann Eberhard Ludwig Ehrenreich. The latter had founded a faience factory at Marieberg in Sweden, and the products

  • Stralsund, Treaty of (1370)

    Denmark: Reunion under Valdemar IV: …rather favourable peace treaty at Stralsund in 1370, which gave the Hanseatic League trading rights in Denmark and pawned parts of Sk?ne to the league for 15 years. Valdemar returned home and continued his work of stabilizing the crown’s hold on the country until he died in 1375.

  • Stram, Hank (American football coach)

    Hank Stram, (Henry Louis Stram), American football coach (born Jan. 3, 1923, Chicago, Ill.—died July 4, 2005, Covington, La.), steered the Kansas City Chiefs to three American Football League titles (1962 [when the franchise was in Texas], 1966, and 1969) and two Super Bowl appearances (1967 and 1

  • Stram, Henry Louis (American football coach)

    Hank Stram, (Henry Louis Stram), American football coach (born Jan. 3, 1923, Chicago, Ill.—died July 4, 2005, Covington, La.), steered the Kansas City Chiefs to three American Football League titles (1962 [when the franchise was in Texas], 1966, and 1969) and two Super Bowl appearances (1967 and 1

  • strambotto (verse form)

    Strambotto, one of the oldest Italian verse forms, composed of a single stanza of either six or eight hendecasyllabic (11-syllable) lines. Strambotti were particularly popular in Renaissance Sicily and Tuscany, and the origin of the form in either region is still uncertain. Variations of the

  • Stramenopiles (protist)

    protozoan: Annotated classification: Stramenopiles Group consists of 4 heterotrophic clades and 15 predominantly autotrophic clades and contains many examples of secondarily-derived heterotrophs; in autotrophic groups, fucoxanthin is the dominant accessory pigment. Apomorphic (derived) trait is the tubular tripartite flagellar hair construction, basal portion of which is attached to…

  • Stramonita haemastoma (mollusk)

    purple: …the mollusks Stramonita (also called Purpura) haemastoma and Bolinus (formerly Murex) brandaris, the shells of which have been found adjacent to ancient dyeworks at Athens and Pompeii. The colour-producing secretion is contained in a small cyst adjacent to the head of the animal, and this puslike matter, when spread on…

  • stramonium (drug)
  • Strand (cinema, New York City, New York, United States)

    history of the motion picture: Pre-World War I American cinema: Marks’s 3,300-seat Strand, which opened in the Broadway district of Manhattan in 1914). Known as “dream palaces” because of the fantastic luxuriance of their interiors, these houses had to show features rather than a program of shorts to attract large audiences at premium prices. By 1916 there…

  • strand casting (metallurgy)

    metallurgy: Continuous casting: Actually not a means of casting parts, continuous casting is practiced in the primary production of metals to form strands for further processing. The metal is poured into a short, reciprocating, water-cooled mold and solidifies even as it is withdrawn from the other…

  • Strand Magazine, The (British magazine)

    history of publishing: General periodicals: …Magazine (1898), and, above all, The Strand Magazine (1891–1950), one of the first monthly magazines of light literature with plenty of illustrations. The Strand became enormously popular and is perhaps most famous for its Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. Among the early contributors to Tit-Bits was Alfred Harmsworth…

  • strand vegetation (flora)

    Africa: Afromontane vegetation: All high mountains exhibit azonality; i.e., their vegetation differs from that found in the climatic zones from which they rise. The differences manifest themselves as progressive modifications, which are usually well stratified and reflect altitude-dependent climatic changes. Generally, as elevation increases, temperature decreases (to…

  • Strand, Mark (Canadian-American poet, writer, and translator)

    Mark Strand, Canadian poet, writer of short fiction, and translator whose poetry, noted for its surreal quality, explores the boundaries of the self and the external world. Educated at Antioch College (B.A., 1957), Yale University (B.F.A., 1959), and the University of Iowa (M.A., 1962), Strand

  • Strand, Mark Apter (Canadian-American poet, writer, and translator)

    Mark Strand, Canadian poet, writer of short fiction, and translator whose poetry, noted for its surreal quality, explores the boundaries of the self and the external world. Educated at Antioch College (B.A., 1957), Yale University (B.F.A., 1959), and the University of Iowa (M.A., 1962), Strand

  • Strand, Paul (American photographer)

    Paul Strand, photographer whose work influenced the emphasis on sharp-focused, objective images in 20th-century American photography. When he was 17 years old, Strand began to study photography with Lewis W. Hine, who was later noted for his photographs of industrial workers and immigrants. At

  • strand-plain coast (geology)

    coastal landforms: Strand-plain coasts: Some wave-dominated coasts do not contain estuaries and have no barrier island system. These coasts, however, do have beaches and dunes, and may even have coastal marshes. The term strand plain has been applied to coasts of this sort. Examples include parts of…

  • Strandberg, Carl Vilhelm August (Swedish author)

    Swedish literature: Emergence of realism and Poetic Realism: …a good deal of verse: Carl Vilhelm August Strandberg (pseudonym Talis Qualis), the fieriest poet of this type, later made excellent translations from British Romantic poet Lord Byron. Popular reading was provided by August Blanche in Bilder ur verkligheten (1863–65; “Pictures of Real Life”), short stories depicting Stockholm life with…

  • Stranded (film by Borzage [1935])

    Frank Borzage: Stranded (1935) was a romance starring Brent and Francis set against the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge, while Shipmates Forever (1935) was another Powell-Keeler musical. Hearts Divided (1936) paired Powell with Marion Davies in a musical set in the time of Napoleon. Desire (1936),…

  • stranding (animal behaviour)

    cetacean: Stranding: Stranding is a phenomenon that has long fascinated people, and there is fossil evidence of mass strandings from before humans evolved. Many stranded cetaceans are found already dead, and it is not known if they were alive and conscious when they stranded themselves. When…

  • stranding (industrial process)

    rope: Manufacturing process.: Strands, also known as readies, are formed by twisting yarns, or small cords, together. The stranding machines, called formers or bunchers, vary in size and form depending on ability to accommodate continuous strand lengths as well as on production rates and flyer speeds.

  • Strandloper (novel by Garner)

    Alan Garner: Strandloper (1996) is based on the true story of an Englishman who lived with Australian Aborigines for more than 30 years. Thursbitch (2003) intertwines events taking place in the titular English valley in the 18th and 21st centuries. The Stone Book Quartet—comprising The Stone Book…

  • Strang, Gunnar Georg Emanuel (Swedish politician)

    Gunnar Georg Emanuel Strang, Swedish politician who was finance minister (1955–76) in a succession of Social Democratic cabinets and one of the architects of Sweden’s national social-welfare system. Strang was a self-educated agricultural labourer and trade-union organizer who rose to become

  • Strang, James Jesse (American religious leader)

    James Jesse Strang, American churchman, dissident of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), whose futile attempt to succeed Joseph Smith as its leader led him to found the Strangite sect. Admitted to the bar in 1836 after teaching for a brief period, Strang also served as

  • Strang, Jesse James (American religious leader)

    James Jesse Strang, American churchman, dissident of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), whose futile attempt to succeed Joseph Smith as its leader led him to found the Strangite sect. Admitted to the bar in 1836 after teaching for a brief period, Strang also served as

  • Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, The (film by Siodmak [1945])

    Robert Siodmak: The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry (1945), an adaptation of a Broadway play, was a psychological thriller with George Sanders as a designer whose relationship with a young woman (Raines) is threatened by his possessive sister (Geraldine Fitzgerald).

  • strange attractor (mathematics)

    chaos theory: …a new class of “strange attractors” was discovered by the American mathematician Stephen Smale. On strange attractors the dynamics is chaotic. Later it was recognized that strange attractors have detailed structure on all scales of magnification; a direct result of this recognition was the development of the concept of…

  • Strange Career of Jim Crow, The (work by Woodward)

    C. Vann Woodward: …most widely read book was The Strange Career of Jim Crow (1955), in which he showed that the legal segregation of whites and blacks was not rooted in “time immemorial” as had been routinely claimed by Southerners but was actually a relatively recent phenomenon that had been erected in the…

  • Strange Cargo (film by Borzage [1940])

    Frank Borzage: …MGM, Borzage was assigned to Strange Cargo (1940), a parable in which several convicts (among them Clark Gable, Peter Lorre, and Paul Lukas) and a saloon girl (Crawford) escaping from a South American penal colony are redeemed and changed by the spiritual influence of a new prisoner (Ian Hunter), who…

  • Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The (novella by Stevenson)

    The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, novella by Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson, published in 1886. The names of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the two alter egos of the main character, have become shorthand for the exhibition of wildly contradictory behaviour, especially between private

  • Strange Case of Peter the Lett, The (novel by Simenon)

    Georges Simenon: …own name was Pietr-le-Letton (1929; The Strange Case of Peter the Lett), in which he introduced the imperturbable, pipe-smoking Parisian police inspector Jules Maigret to fiction. Simenon went on to write 83 more detective novels featuring Inspector Maigret, as well as 136 psychological novels. His total literary output consisted of…

  • Strange Days (film by Bigelow [1995])

    Kathryn Bigelow: With the science-fiction movie Strange Days (1995), she created a stylish drama involving futuristic technology that enables the transmission of thoughts and memories from one person to another. After The Weight of Water (2000), Bigelow helmed K-19: The Widowmaker (2002). Based on a true event, it focuses on a…

  • Strange Fugitive (work by Callaghan)

    Morley Callaghan: Strange Fugitive (1928), the first of Callaghan’s more than 10 novels, describes the destruction of a social misfit, a type that recurs in Callaghan’s fiction. His novels examine questions of morality and social class, and his later works show an emphasis on Christian love as…

  • Strange Impersonation (film by Mann [1946])

    Anthony Mann: The 1940s: film noirs: …to Republic Studios to make Strange Impersonation (1946), an eerie mystery that had a research scientist (Brenda Marshall) caught in a web of murder and blackmail. The Bamboo Blonde (1946) was a hybrid of a musical and a war movie about a bomber pilot who falls in love with a…

  • Strange Incident (film by Wellman [1943])

    The Ox-Bow Incident, American western film, released in 1943, that was a thought-provoking and disturbing look at the dangers of mob justice. The movie, which was based on the novel of the same name by Walter van Tilburg Clark, epitomized a new maturity in the western movie genre, having progressed

  • Strange Interlude (play by O’Neill)

    Strange Interlude, Pulitzer Prize-winning drama in two parts and nine acts by Eugene O’Neill. It was produced in 1928 in New York City and was published the same year. The work’s complicated plot is the story of a woman in her roles as daughter, wife, mistress, mother, and friend. Its length was an

  • Strange Intruder (film by Rapper [1956])

    Irving Rapper: Later films: The drama Strange Intruder (1956) had difficulty overcoming a far-fetched storyline: a dying soldier, thinking that his wife (Ida Lupino) has been unfaithful, asks his friend (Edward Purdom) to kill his children. The Brave One (1956) was a sentimental but effective tale of a Mexican boy who…

  • Strange Justice: The Selling of Clarence Thomas (work by Abramson and Mayer)

    Jill Abramson: Strange Justice: The Selling of Clarence Thomas (1994; cowritten with Jane Mayer) covers the controversial confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in 1991, focusing on Republican efforts to downplay allegations of sexual harassment against him. She experimented with lighter fare in The Puppy Diaries:…

  • strange loop

    number game: Impossible figures: …introduced the undecidable figures called strange loops. One of these is the Penrose square stairway (Figure 6), which one could apparently traverse in either direction forever without getting higher or lower. Strange loops are important features of some of M.C. Escher’s lithographs, including “Ascending and Descending” (1960) and “Waterfall” (1961).…

  • Strange Love of Martha Ivers, The (film by Milestone [1946])

    Lewis Milestone: War dramas: The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946) was a departure for Milestone, an effective film noir starring Barbara Stanwyck, Lizabeth Scott, and (in his film debut) Kirk Douglas. Arch of Triumph (1948), adapted from the Remarque novel and coscripted by Milestone, was a romance set…

  • Strange Love of Molly Louvain, The (film by Curtiz [1932])

    Michael Curtiz: Early life and work: Some critics have pointed to The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932), a gangster film starring Ann Dvorak and Lee Tracy, as Curtiz’s first personalized effort, but most confer that distinction on Doctor X (1932). A creepy horror film with Lionel Atwill as the mad mastermind and Tracy and Fay…

  • Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder, A (novel by De Mille)

    Canadian literature: From settlement to 1900: …De Mille’s satiric travel fantasy A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder (1888) and Roberts’s renowned quasi-documentary animal stories (Earth’s Enigmas, 1896; The Kindred of the Wild, 1902) represented different and original fictional forms.

  • Strange newes (work by Nashe)

    Thomas Nashe: …exchange of pamphlets with Harvey, Strange Newes (1592) and Have with You to Saffron-Walden (1596). If Harvey is to be credited, Nashe was a hack for the printer John Danter in 1593. The controversy was terminated in 1599, when the archbishop of Canterbury ordered that “all Nasshes bookes and Doctor…

  • strange particle (physics)

    subatomic particle: Strangeness: The discovery of the pion in 1947 seemed to restore order to the study of particle physics, but this order did not last long. Later in the year Clifford Butler and George Rochester, two British physicists studying cosmic rays, discovered the first examples of…

  • strange quark (subatomic particle)

    quark: Quark flavours: Strange quarks (charge ?13e) occur as components of K mesons and various other extremely short-lived subatomic particles that were first observed in cosmic rays but that play no part in ordinary matter.

  • strange situation experiment

    human behaviour: Attachment: …is known as the “strange situation.” Two episodes that are part of a longer series in this procedure involve leaving the infant with a stranger and leaving the infant alone in an unfamiliar room. Children who show only moderate distress when the mother leaves, seek her upon her return,…

  • Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio (work by Pu Songling)

    Chinese literature: Prose fiction: Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio). This collection, completed in 1679, was reminiscent of the early literary tale tradition, for it contained several Tang stories retold with embellishments and minor changes to delineate the characters more realistically and to make the plots more probable. Such…

  • Strange Tales (Marvel Comics series)

    Doctor Strange: Origin and development in the Silver Age: …Strange propelled the sales of Strange Tales throughout the mid-1960s. In 1968 he was given his own book, and new artist Gene Colan produced hallucinatory layouts for Doctor Strange that were even more experimental than Ditko’s. When sales dipped, there was a last-ditch attempt to make Doctor Strange more like…

  • Strange Woman, The (film by Ulmer [1946])

    Edgar G. Ulmer: Later films: …direct the expensive film noir The Strange Woman (1946) at United Artists (UA). Hedy Lamarr starred as a woman in 1820s Maine who plots to have her wealthy husband killed. Carnegie Hall (1947) was an atypical entry in Ulmer’s filmography, a UA musical that was more highbrow than his usual…

  • Strange’s Men (English theatrical company)

    Lord Strange’s Men, prominent Elizabethan acting company. A household troupe of Lord Strange, they toured the provinces before appearing at court in 1582. From 1588 to 1594 they were associated with the Admiral’s Men. It has been suggested that Lord Strange’s Men were the first to employ William S

  • Strange, Adam (comic-book character)

    Adam Strange, fictional superhero. Among the many things gripping the imaginations of children in the late 1950s were the emerging superheroes of the Silver Age of comics (1956–1969) and the beginnings of the space race. DC Comics decided to combine those two interests by launching a pair of space

  • Strange, Baron (English commander)

    James Stanley, 7th earl of Derby, prominent Royalist commander in the English Civil War, who was executed by the Parliamentarians. Eldest son of William, the 6th earl, he was returned to Parliament for Liverpool in 1625 and on March 7, 1628, entered the House of Lords as Baron Strange. When the

  • Strange, Luther (United States senator)

    Luther Strange, American politician who was appointed as a Republican to the U.S. Senate from Alabama in 2017 and held the office until 2018. He previously served (2011–17) as the state’s attorney general. Strange studied political science at Tulane University (B.A., 1975), which he attended on a

  • Strange, Luther J. III (United States senator)

    Luther Strange, American politician who was appointed as a Republican to the U.S. Senate from Alabama in 2017 and held the office until 2018. He previously served (2011–17) as the state’s attorney general. Strange studied political science at Tulane University (B.A., 1975), which he attended on a

  • Strange, Michael (American writer and performer)

    Michael Strange, American writer and performer who produced poetry and plays, acted onstage, and did readings for radio. Oelrichs was of a well-to-do and socially prominent family. She was the reigning debutante of Newport society until her marriage in 1910 to Leonard M. Thomas, a rising young

  • Strange, Michael (American writer and performer)

    Michael Strange, American writer and performer who produced poetry and plays, acted onstage, and did readings for radio. Oelrichs was of a well-to-do and socially prominent family. She was the reigning debutante of Newport society until her marriage in 1910 to Leonard M. Thomas, a rising young

  • strangeness (physics)

    subatomic particle: Strangeness: The discovery of the pion in 1947 seemed to restore order to the study of particle physics, but this order did not last long. Later in the year Clifford Butler and George Rochester, two British physicists studying cosmic rays, discovered the first examples of…

  • Strangeness in My Mind, A (novel by Pamuk)

    Orhan Pamuk: Kafamda Bir Tuhafl?k (2014; A Strangeness in My Mind) is a love story set in Istanbul.

  • strangeness quantum number (physics)

    subatomic particle: Strangeness: …proposal, particles are assigned a strangeness quantum number, S, which can have only integer values. The pion, proton, and neutron have S = 0. Because the strong force conserves strangeness, it can produce strange particles only in pairs, in which the net value of strangeness is zero. This phenomenon, the…

  • stranger anxiety (emotion)

    human behaviour: Emotional development: …unfamiliar person, a phenomenon called stranger anxiety. A month or two later the infant may cry when his mother leaves him in an unfamiliar place; this phenomenon is called separation anxiety. It is no accident that both stranger and separation anxiety first appear about the time the child becomes able…

  • Stranger in a Strange Land (novel by Heinlein)

    Stranger in a Strange Land, classic science fiction novel by American writer Robert A. Heinlein, published in 1961. The work centres on a human raised on Mars who comes to Earth and challenges customs relating to sex, death, religion, and money. The book became an icon of the 1960s counterculture,

  • Stranger Is Watching, A (novel by Clark)

    Mary Higgins Clark: …and her later novels included A Stranger Is Watching (1977), While My Pretty One Sleeps (1989), We’ll Meet Again (1999), Daddy’s Gone a Hunting (2013), and I’ve Got My Eyes on You (2018). Several of Clark’s novels and stories were adapted into films.

  • Stranger Than Fiction (film by Forster [2006])

    Will Ferrell: …Internal Revenue Service agent in Stranger than Fiction (2006) and an alcoholic selling his possessions in Everything Must Go (2010), an adaptation of a Raymond Carver short story.

  • Stranger than Paradise (film by Jarmusch [1984])

    Jim Jarmusch: His next movie, Stranger than Paradise (1984), established his reputation as a new voice in independent cinema. Jarmusch continued to earn acclaim for films such as the offbeat comedies Down by Law (1986), Mystery Train (1989), and Night on Earth (1992).

  • Stranger to Stranger (album by Simon)

    Paul Simon: Later work and assessment: Stranger to Stranger (2016) was an experimental mélange of rhythmic instruments and textures that drew inspiration from eclectic composer Harry Partch.

  • Stranger, The (film by Welles [1946])

    Orson Welles: Films of the later 1940s: The Stranger, The Lady from Shanghai, and Macbeth: The Stranger (1946) was a thriller about a Nazi, Franz Kindler (Welles), who is hiding out as a schoolteacher in a small New England town. His impending nuptials with a fellow teacher (Loretta Young) are interrupted when a war-crimes investigator (Edward G. Robinson) tracks him…

  • Stranger, The (work by Kuncewiczowa)

    Maria Kuncewiczowa: Cudzoziemka (1936; The Stranger) is a psychoanalytic study of alienation in an ethnically foreign country. Her novel Dni powszednie państwa Kowalskich (1938; “The Daily Life of the Kowalskis”) was broadcast by radio in Poland before World War II.

  • Stranger, The (recording by Joel)

    Billy Joel: …and set the stage for The Stranger (1977). Featuring four U.S. hit singles (one of which, “Just the Way You Are,” won Grammy Awards for song of the year and record of the year), it sold five million copies, surpassing Simon and Garfunkel’s Bridge over Troubled Water to become Columbia’s…

  • Stranger, The (novel by Camus)

    The Stranger, enigmatic first novel by Albert Camus, published in French as L’étranger in 1942. It was published as The Outsider in England and as The Stranger in the United States. The title character of The Stranger is Meursault, a Frenchman who lives in Algiers (a pied-noir). The novel is famous

  • Stranger, The (film by Visconti [1967])

    Anna Karina: >The Stranger) and Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Chinesisches Roulette (1976; Chinese Roulette), it is for her work with Godard that she is most remembered. In 1973 she tried her hand at screenwriting and directing; the result, Vivre ensemble (Living Together), met with limited success. That same…

  • Strangers and Brothers (novel by Snow)

    English literature: Fiction: Snow’s earnest 11-novel sequence, Strangers and Brothers (1940–70), about a man’s journey from the provincial lower classes to London’s “corridors of power,” had its admirers. But the most inspired fictional cavalcade of social and cultural life in 20th-century Britain was Angus Wilson’s No Laughing Matter (1967), a book that…

  • Strangers at the Gates: The Immigration Backlash

    By 2002 Immigration had emerged as a key issue in many developed nations of the world. The determination of governments to control the flow of immigrants to their nations’ shores was the focus of intense debate and, increasingly, the subject of controversy. In an incident that captured worldwide

  • Strangers in the Night (song by Kaempfert)

    Berthold Kaempfert: …with the love song “Strangers in the Night,” made popular by Frank Sinatra.

  • Strangers of the Evening (film by Humberstone [1932])

    H. Bruce Humberstone: …helmed his first feature film, Strangers of the Evening. Although largely forgettable, the comedy-horror movie launched Humberstone’s career as a prolific and versatile director.

  • Strangers on a Train (work by Highsmith)

    Patricia Highsmith: In 1950 she published Strangers on a Train, an intriguing story of two men, one ostensibly good and the other ostensibly evil, whose lives become inextricably entangled. The following year the novel was made into a movie by Alfred Hitchcock, using a screenplay by Raymond Chandler and Czenzi Ormonde.…

  • Strangers on a Train (film by Hitchcock [1951])

    Strangers on a Train, American thriller film, released in 1951, that was produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock and based on the novel of the same name by Patricia Highsmith. Raymond Chandler cowrote the film’s screenplay. Tennis star Guy Haines (played by Farley Granger) meets a stranger, Bruno

  • Strangers to Ourselves (album by Modest Mouse)

    Modest Mouse: …prolonged hiatus, Modest Mouse released Strangers to Ourselves in 2015.

  • Strangers When We Meet (film by Quine [1960])

    Richard Quine: Quine examined adultery in Strangers When We Meet (1960), with the cheating couple played by Kirk Douglas and Novak. In the romance The World of Suzie Wong (1960), William Holden was cast as an aspiring artist anguishing over a prostitute (played by Nancy Kwan). The Notorious Landlady (1962), which…

  • Strangers with Candy (television program)

    Stephen Colbert: … (1995–96) and the bizarre sitcom Strangers with Candy (1999–2000), both on the Comedy Central cable network. Colbert worked on several other television projects before joining in 1997 Comedy Central’s The Daily Show, which was hosted by Jon Stewart. For eight years he was a correspondent and writer on the news…

  • Strangeways, Here We Come (album by the Smiths)

    the Smiths: …last album for Rough Trade, Strangeways, Here We Come (1987), the group broke up unexpectedly.

  • Strangford Lough (inlet, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Strangford Lough, inlet of the Irish Sea between the Ards and North Down district and the Newry, Mourne and Down district, Northern Ireland. The lough (lake) is about 16 miles (26 km) long and 4 miles (6 km) wide and has a very narrow entrance, which cuts across the northeast-southwest trend of the

  • Strangford Treaty (Brazilian history)

    Strangford Treaty, (1810), agreement between the Portuguese government, then in exile in its Brazilian colony, and Great Britain, represented by its ambassador, Lord Strangford. The treaty provided for the importation of British manufactures into Brazil and the exportation of Brazilian agricultural

  • Strangites (religious sect)

    James Jesse Strang: …led him to found the Strangite sect.

  • strangler (tree)

    Strangler fig, any of numerous species of tropical figs (genus Ficus, family Moraceae) named for their pattern of growth upon host trees, which often results in the host’s death. Strangler figs and other strangler species are common in tropical forests throughout the world. Although a strangler fig

  • strangler fig (plant, Ficus obtusifolia)

    Ficus: Major species: …species, including the New World F. obtusifolia and F. nymphaeifolia, are known as strangler figs. The seeds of strangler figs germinate on a host tree and grow around its trunk in a strangling latticework, eventually killing the host tree. One freestanding New World species, F. insipida, has the highest photosynthetic…

  • strangler fig (tree)

    Strangler fig, any of numerous species of tropical figs (genus Ficus, family Moraceae) named for their pattern of growth upon host trees, which often results in the host’s death. Strangler figs and other strangler species are common in tropical forests throughout the world. Although a strangler fig

  • strangler fig (plant, Ficus nymphaeifolia)

    Ficus: Major species: obtusifolia and F. nymphaeifolia, are known as strangler figs. The seeds of strangler figs germinate on a host tree and grow around its trunk in a strangling latticework, eventually killing the host tree. One freestanding New World species, F. insipida, has the highest photosynthetic rate of any…

  • strangles (horse disease)

    Strangles, horse disease caused by Streptococcus equi, a bacterium that invades nasal and throat passages and forms abscesses in lymph nodes and other parts of the body. It is also called distemper of horses. Young horses are most susceptible to it, and outbreaks of the disease usually occur where

  • strangulated hernia (physiology)

    hernia: A strangulated hernia is one in which the circulation of blood through the hernia is impeded by pinching at the narrowest part of the passage; congestion is followed by inflammation, infection, and gangrene. The tighter the constriction, the more rapidly these events take place; unrelieved strangulation…

  • straniero, Lo (film by Visconti [1967])

    Anna Karina: >The Stranger) and Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Chinesisches Roulette (1976; Chinese Roulette), it is for her work with Godard that she is most remembered. In 1973 she tried her hand at screenwriting and directing; the result, Vivre ensemble (Living Together), met with limited success. That same…

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