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  • substrate (electronics)

    electronic substrate and package ceramics: …materials that can serve as substrates (that is, the bases on which the microscopic electronic components and their connections are built) and packages (that is, the structures that seal a circuit from the environment and make it a single, compact unit). The insulating properties of ceramics are well known, and…

  • substrate-level phosphorylation (chemical reaction)

    metabolism: Substrate-level phosphorylation: In substrate-level phosphorylation a phosphoryl group is transferred from an energy-rich donor (e.g., 1,3-diphosphoglycerate) to ADP to yield a molecule of ATP. This type of ATP synthesis (reactions [7], [10], and [43]) does not require molecular oxygen (O2), although it is frequently, but…

  • substratum language (language)

    creole languages: Theories of creolization: …structural development of creole vernaculars—the substrate, superstrate, and universalist hypotheses. In this context, substrate signifies non-European languages, and superstrate signifies European languages. According to substratists, creoles were formed by the languages previously spoken by Africans enslaved in the Americas and the Indian Ocean, which imposed their structural features upon the…

  • substructural logic (mathematics)

    foundations of mathematics: Other logics: …important have been various so-called substructural logics in which the usual properties of the deduction symbol are weakened: relevance logic is studied by philosophers, linear logic by computer scientists, and a noncommutative version of the latter by linguists.

  • subsurface drainage

    soil: Water runoff: Subsurface runoff cannot easily penetrate the clay layer and flows laterally along the horizon as it moves toward the stream system. This type of runoff is slower than its erosive counterpart over the land surface and leads to water saturation of the upper part of…

  • subsurface irrigation

    horticulture: Water management: Subirrigation is the distribution of water to soil below the surface; it provides moisture to crops by upward capillary action. Trickle irrigation involves the slow release of water to each plant through small plastic tubes. This technique is adapted both to field and to greenhouse…

  • subsurface tillage (agriculture)

    agricultural technology: Mulch tillage: Mulch tillage has been mentioned already; in this system, crop residues are left on the surface, and subsurface tillage leaves them relatively undisturbed. In dryland areas, a maximum amount of mulch is left on the surface; in more humid regions, however, some of…

  • subsurface water (hydrology)

    Groundwater, water that occurs below the surface of Earth, where it occupies all or part of the void spaces in soils or geologic strata. It is also called subsurface water to distinguish it from surface water, which is found in large bodies like the oceans or lakes or which flows overland in

  • Subterranean Physics (work by Becher)

    Johann Joachim Becher: …substances were set forth in Subterranean Physics (1669). At Munich he suggested that the elector of Bavaria establish South American colonies and a cloth-trade monopoly, but angry merchants forced him to flee. At Vienna he proposed a Rhine–Danube canal and was also employed in experiments to transmute Danube sand into…

  • subterranean termite (insect)

    termite: Importance: Subterranean termites are dependent on contact with soil moisture and normally reach the wood in man-made structures through the foundations. The most common traditional control used around a structure is to flood a shallow trench with an insecticide and cover it with soil. Insecticides also…

  • Subterraneans, The (novel by Kerouac)

    Jack Kerouac: Sketching, poetry, and Buddhism: …fall of 1953 he finished The Subterraneans (it would be published in 1958). Fed up with the world after the failed love affair upon which the book was based, he read Henry David Thoreau and fantasized a life outside civilization. He immersed himself in the study of Zen, and he…

  • subtertian malaria (disease)

    malaria: The course of the disease: Victims of this “malignant tertian” form of the disease may deteriorate rapidly from mild symptoms to coma and death unless they are diagnosed and treated promptly and properly. The greater virulence of P. falciparum is associated with its tendency to infect a large proportion of the red blood…

  • subthalamic nucleus (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Subthalamus: …is represented mainly by the subthalamic nucleus, a lens-shaped structure lying behind and to the sides of the hypothalamus and on the dorsal surface of the internal capsule. The subthalamic region is traversed by fibres related to the globus pallidus. Discrete lesions of the subthalmic nucleus produce hemiballismus, a violent…

  • subthalamus (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Subthalamus: The subthalamus is represented mainly by the subthalamic nucleus, a lens-shaped structure lying behind and to the sides of the hypothalamus and on the dorsal surface of the internal capsule. The subthalamic region is traversed by fibres related to the globus pallidus. Discrete lesions…

  • Subtiaba-Tlapanecan languages

    Mesoamerican Indian languages: The classification and status of Mesoamerican languages: Eastern Otomanguean

  • subtilisin (biochemstry)

    Frances Arnold: She altered the enyzme subtilisin E, which breaks down the protein casein, so it would work in the solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) instead of in the watery environment of a cell. She introduced many random mutations into the genetic code of bacteria that made subtilisin E, and she introduced her

  • subtitle (secondary title)

    Subtitle, a secondary or explanatory title. Such titles can explain the form of the work, as in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Remorse: A Tragedy, in Five Acts; they can give an idea of the theme or contents of the book, as in George Eliot’s Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life; or they can simply be

  • Subtlety; or, The Marvelous Sugar Baby, A (art installation by Walker)

    Kara Walker: The work, A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby, featured a colossal 35-foot- (10.7-metre-) tall sugar-coated polystyrene female sphinx and a cortege of molasses-coloured candy figurine boys hauling baskets and bananas. With a kerchief knotted on her head and exaggerated nose and lips, the sphinx recalled the…

  • subtotal gastrectomy (medicine)

    gastrectomy: In a more extensive procedure, subtotal gastrectomy, as much as three-quarters of the stomach is removed, including all of the antrum. The remaining stomach may then be reattached directly to the duodenum or to the jejunum, a more distal part of the intestine beyond the usual site of ulceration.

  • subtraction (mathematics)

    arithmetic: Integers: Subtraction has not been introduced for the simple reason that it can be defined as the inverse of addition. Thus, the difference a ? b of two numbers a and b is defined as a solution x of the equation b + x = a.…

  • subtractive mixture (colour)

    colour: The laws of colour mixture: Subtractive colour mixing involves the absorption and selective transmission or reflection of light. It occurs when colorants (such as pigments or dyes) are mixed or when several coloured filters are inserted into a single beam of white light. For example, if a projector is fitted…

  • subtractive principle (numeral systems)

    numerals and numeral systems: Roman numerals: The subtractive principle is seen in Hebrew number names, as well as in the occasional use of IV for 4 and IX for 9 in Roman inscriptions. The Romans also used unus de viginti (“one from twenty”) for 19 and duo de viginti (“two from twenty”)…

  • subtractive synthesis (electronic sound)

    music synthesizer: The aforementioned synthesizers used subtractive synthesis—removing unwanted components from a signal containing a fundamental tone and all related overtones (sawtooth-wave signals). The harmonic-tone generator developed by James Beauchamp at the University of Illinois, in contrast, used additive synthesis—building tones from signals for pure tones, i.e., without overtones (sine-wave signals)—and…

  • subtractive synthesis (colour)

    colour: The laws of colour mixture: Subtractive colour mixing involves the absorption and selective transmission or reflection of light. It occurs when colorants (such as pigments or dyes) are mixed or when several coloured filters are inserted into a single beam of white light. For example, if a projector is fitted…

  • subtropical anticyclone (meteorology)

    Subtropical high, one of several regions of semipermanent high atmospheric pressure located over the oceans between 20° and 40° of latitude in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres of the Earth. These highs are associated with the subsidence of the Hadley cell and move several degrees of

  • subtropical convergence (hydrology)

    Antarctica: The surrounding seas: …latitude lying south of the Subtropical Convergence (at about 40° S) and north of the Antarctic Convergence (between about 50° and 60° S). The Subtropical Convergence generally defines the northern limits of a water mass having so many unique physical and biological characteristics that it is often given a separate…

  • subtropical forest (ecology)
  • subtropical gyre (oceanography)

    Subtropical gyre, an area of anticyclonic ocean circulation that sits beneath a region of subtropical high pressure. The movement of ocean water within the Ekman layer of these gyres forces surface water to sink, giving rise to the subtropical convergence near 20°–30° latitude. The centres of

  • subtropical high (meteorology)

    Subtropical high, one of several regions of semipermanent high atmospheric pressure located over the oceans between 20° and 40° of latitude in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres of the Earth. These highs are associated with the subsidence of the Hadley cell and move several degrees of

  • subtropical jet stream (meteorology)

    Subtropical jet stream, a belt of strong upper-level winds lying above regions of subtropical high pressure. Unlike the polar front jet stream, it travels in lower latitudes and at slightly higher elevations, owing to the increase in height of the tropopause at lower latitudes. The associated

  • subtropical ridge (meteorology)

    Subtropical high, one of several regions of semipermanent high atmospheric pressure located over the oceans between 20° and 40° of latitude in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres of the Earth. These highs are associated with the subsidence of the Hadley cell and move several degrees of

  • Subud (Indonesian religious group)

    Subud, religious movement, based on spontaneous and ecstatic exercises, founded by an Indonesian, Mu?ammad Subuh, called Bapak. A student of ?ūfism (Islāmic mysticism) as a youth, Bapak had a powerful mystical experience in 1925, and in 1933 he claimed that the mission to found the Subud movement

  • Subuh, Muhammad (Indonesian religious leader)

    Subud: …an Indonesian, Mu?ammad Subuh, called Bapak. A student of ?ūfism (Islāmic mysticism) as a youth, Bapak had a powerful mystical experience in 1925, and in 1933 he claimed that the mission to found the Subud movement was revealed to him. The movement was restricted to Indonesia until the 1950s, when…

  • subunguis (zoology)

    integument: Claws, nails, and hooves: …covering a ventral plate (subunguis), the whole capping the bony tip of a digit. Nails—found only in mammals—consist of a broad and flattened unguis, with the subunguis reduced to a vestige under the outer tip. Hooves, the characteristic feature of the hoofed mammals, or ungulates, are exaggerated nails, with…

  • subunit vaccine (vaccine)

    vaccine: Vaccine types: …type of vaccine is a subunit vaccine, which is made from proteins found on the surface of infectious agents. Vaccines for influenza and hepatitis B are of that type. When toxins, the metabolic by-products of infectious organisms, are inactivated to form toxoids, they can be used to stimulate immunity against…

  • suburb (society and ecology)

    United States: New factors in municipal development: Many suburbs and subdivisions arose with single-family homes on lots larger than had been possible for the ordinary householder in the city. These communities were almost totally dependent on the highway for the flow of commuters, goods, and services, and many were located in splendid isolation,…

  • suburban bus (vehicle)

    bus: Modern buses: The suburban bus is designed for short intercity runs and has high-back seats, luggage compartments and racks, and a single, front entrance.

  • Suburban Gardener and Villa Companion, The (work by Loudon)

    John Claudius Loudon: …and published his widely read The Suburban Gardener and Villa Companion, which set the style for the smaller gardens kept by England’s expanding middle class.

  • suburban sprawl

    Urban sprawl, the rapid expansion of the geographic extent of cities and towns, often characterized by low-density residential housing, single-use zoning, and increased reliance on the private automobile for transportation. Urban sprawl is caused in part by the need to accommodate a rising urban

  • suburbanization (sociology)

    modernization: New patterns of urban life: …practical saturation point, leads to suburbanization, the desire to live in neighbourhoods with green spaces and at least a breath of country air. As the suburbs fill up, the more prosperous citizens become exurban: they colonize the villages and small towns of the countryside within commuting distance of their work…

  • Suburbicon (film by Clooney [2017])

    Coen brothers: …Clooney for the dark comedy Suburbicon (2017).

  • Suburbs of Hell, The (novel by Stow)

    Randolph Stow: His final novel, The Suburbs of Hell (1984), deals with murder in a small English town.

  • Suburbs, The (album by Arcade Fire)

    Arcade Fire: Arcade Fire’s third album, The Suburbs (2010), departed from the elegiac sound of its predecessor, incorporating synthesizers and New Wave dance beats into a meditation on the cyclical nature of life. Despite the fact that the band continued to lack the marketing support of a major record label, the…

  • Suburra, Corrado di (pope)

    Anastasius IV, pope from July 1153 to December 1154. As cardinal bishop of Sabina, he had staunchly supported Pope Innocent II in 1130, serving as his vicar in Rome during the contest with the antipope Anacletus II. Crowned in the Lateran Palace in Rome, the old pope spent lavishly for its

  • Subversion Decree (1972, Ghana)

    Ghana: Series of coups: In July 1972 a retroactive Subversion Decree was enacted under which military courts were empowered to impose the death penalty for offenses such as subversive political activity, robbery, theft, and damaging public property, and, from 1973, for the spreading of rumours and profiteering. The military regime was clearly failing to…

  • Subversive Activities Control Act (United States [1950])

    Elizabeth Gurley Flynn: …a provision of the 1950 Subversive Activities Control Act that denied the issuance of passports to communists, was won in 1964, and she promptly secured a passport in order to visit the Soviet Union. When she died that year, she was given a state funeral in Red Square.

  • Subversives, The (film by Taviani brothers)

    Taviani brothers: I sovversivi (1967; The Subversives) mixes documentary footage with a fictional story about the death of a leader and the end of an era for the Italian Left.

  • subvolcanic rock

    igneous rock: Classification of volcanic and hypabyssal rocks: Owing to the aphanitic texture of volcanic and hypabyssal rocks, their modes cannot be readily determined; consequently, a chemical classification is widely accepted and employed by most petrologists. One popular scheme is based on the use of both chemical components and normative mineralogy.…

  • Subway (restaurant chain)

    Subway, restaurant chain specializing in submarine sandwiches. In 2002 it became the largest fast-food chain in the United States, measured by number of outlets. The company operates in more than 100 countries. Headquarters are in Milford, Connecticut. Subway began in August 1965 as a partnership

  • subway

    Subway, underground railway system used to transport large numbers of passengers within urban and suburban areas. Subways are usually built under city streets for ease of construction, but they may take shortcuts and sometimes must pass under rivers. Outlying sections of the system usually emerge

  • subwoofer (loudspeaker)

    loudspeaker: …systems there are separate “subwoofers” and “supertweeters” to reproduce the extremities of the audible spectrum.

  • Success (novel by Amis)

    Martin Amis: …career included Dead Babies (1974), Success (1978), Other People (1981), The Information (1995), and Night Train (1997).

  • succession (law)

    Inheritance, the devolution of property on an heir or heirs upon the death of the owner. The term inheritance also designates the property itself. In modern society, the process is regulated in minute detail by law. In the civil law of the continental European pattern, the pertinent branch is

  • Succession (American television series)

    Holly Hunter: …role in another HBO show, Succession, about a family that owns a global media empire.

  • succession

    ancient Iran: The Middle Elamite period: …period the old system of succession to, and distribution of, power appears to have broken down. Increasingly, son succeeded father, and less is heard of divided authority within a federated system. This probably reflects an effort to increase the central authority at Susa in order to conduct effective military campaigns…

  • succession (biology)

    Ecological succession, the process by which the structure of a biological community evolves over time. Two different types of succession—primary and secondary—have been distinguished. Primary succession occurs in essentially lifeless areas—regions in which the soil is incapable of sustaining life

  • succession cropping (agriculture)

    vegetable farming: Soil preparation and management: It differs from succession cropping in that rotation cropping covers a period of two, three, or more years, while in succession cropping two or more crops are grown on the same land in one year. In many regions vegetable crops are grown in rotation with other farm crops.…

  • Succession History (biblical literature)

    biblical literature: The expansion of the Davidic Empire: …1 and 2, the so-called Succession History, or the Family History of David, which, according to many scholars, forms the oldest section of historiography in Scripture—contains accounts of the domestic problems of David’s reign. Though he showed generosity to Mephibosheth, the sole surviving son of the house of Saul, he…

  • Succession, Act of (England [1534])

    Saint John Fisher: In March 1534 the Act of Succession declared Henry’s marriage to Catherine void and that with Anne Boleyn valid. On the following April 13 Fisher and Sir Thomas More jointly refused to take the oath required by the Act on the grounds that, while willing to accept the succession…

  • succession, law of (law)

    Probate, in Anglo-American law, the judicial proceedings by which it is determined whether or not a paper purporting to be the last will of a deceased person is the legally valid last will. What appears to be a valid will may not be so: it may have been forged, not executed in the way required by

  • Succession, Salic Law of (European law)

    Salic Law of Succession, the rule by which, in certain sovereign dynasties, persons descended from a previous sovereign only through a woman were excluded from succession to the throne. Gradually formulated in France, the rule takes its name from the code of the Salian Franks, the Lex Salica (Salic

  • successive approximations, method of (mathematics)

    Charles-émile Picard: Picard successfully revived the method of successive approximations to prove the existence of solutions to differential equations. He also created a theory of linear differential equations, analogous to the Galois theory of algebraic equations. His studies of harmonic vibrations, coupled with the contributions of Hermann Schwarz of Germany and…

  • successive contrast, law of (optics)

    painting: Colour: Chevreul’s second law, of successive contrast, referred to the optical sensation that a complementary colour halo appears gradually to surround an intense hue. This complementary glow is superimposed on surrounding weaker colours, a gray becoming greenish when juxtaposed with red, reddish in close relationship with green, yellowish against violet,…

  • succinate dehydrogenase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Regeneration of oxaloacetate: …FAD; the reaction, catalyzed by succinate dehydrogenase [44], results in the formation of fumarate and reduced FAD.

  • Succineacea (gastropod superfamily)

    gastropod: Classification: Superfamily Succineacea A problematic group including amber snails (Succineidae), which inhabit swamps and damp areas, and peculiar slugs from the South Pacific (Athoracophoridae). Superfamily Arionacea A group possessing marginal teeth of radula with squarish basal plates and 1 to several cusps; small

  • Succineidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: Succineacea A problematic group including amber snails (Succineidae), which inhabit swamps and damp areas, and peculiar slugs from the South Pacific (Athoracophoridae). Superfamily Arionacea A group possessing marginal teeth of radula with squarish basal plates and 1 to several cusps; small litter or tree snails mainly in Southern Hemisphere (Endodontidae);

  • succinic acid (chemical compound)

    Succinic acid, a dicarboxylic acid of molecular formula C4H6O4 that is widely distributed in almost all plant and animal tissues and that plays a significant role in intermediary metabolism. It is a colourless crystalline solid, soluble in water, with a melting point of 185–187° C (365–369° F). S

  • succinic anhydride (chemical compound)

    carboxylic acid: Polycarboxylic acids: …a water molecule to produce succinic anhydride. Glutaric acid, with five carbon atoms, behaves similarly to yield glutaric anhydride. These reactions produce five- and six-membered rings, respectively, which are in general the easiest ring sizes to produce. Because adipic (six carbons) and longer-chain dicarboxylic acids would give rings of seven…

  • succinyl coenzyme A (enzyme)

    metabolism: Fragmentation of fatty acyl coenzyme A molecules: …molecule undergoes a rearrangement, forming succinyl coenzyme A, which is an intermediate of the TCA cycle.

  • succinylcholine (drug)

    drug: Drugs that affect skeletal muscle: Succinylcholine has an action on the end plate similar to that of acetylcholine. When given systemically, it causes a sustained end-plate depolarization, which first stimulates muscle fibres throughout the body, causing generalized muscle twitching. Within a few seconds, however, the maintained depolarization causes the muscle…

  • Succisa pratensis (plant)

    Dipsacales: Dipsacus clade: Devil’s bit (Succisa pratensis), a blue-flowered perennial, grows wild in European meadows. Its leaves are entire or slightly lobed and oval to narrow in shape.

  • Succos (Judaism)

    Sukkoth, a Jewish autumn festival of double thanksgiving that begins on the 15th day of Tishri (in September or October), five days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is one of the three Pilgrim Festivals of the Hebrew Bible. The Bible refers to ?ag ha-asif (“Feast of the Ingathering,”

  • Succot (Judaism)

    Sukkoth, a Jewish autumn festival of double thanksgiving that begins on the 15th day of Tishri (in September or October), five days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is one of the three Pilgrim Festivals of the Hebrew Bible. The Bible refers to ?ag ha-asif (“Feast of the Ingathering,”

  • Succoth (Judaism)

    Sukkoth, a Jewish autumn festival of double thanksgiving that begins on the 15th day of Tishri (in September or October), five days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is one of the three Pilgrim Festivals of the Hebrew Bible. The Bible refers to ?ag ha-asif (“Feast of the Ingathering,”

  • Succoth (ancient site, Egypt)

    Al-Ismā?īliyyah: …identify the site with biblical Succoth, the Israelites’ first halt in the exodus from Egypt (Ex. 12:37). The canal itself follows the course of an ancient Red Sea–Nile canal, first built by the Saite pharaoh Necho II (610–595 bc). Area 557 square miles (1,442 square km). Pop. (2006) 942,832.

  • succubus (supernatural being)

    Succubus, female form of an incubus

  • succulent (plant)

    Succulent, any plant with thick fleshy tissues adapted to water storage. Some succulents (e.g., cacti) store water only in the stem and have no leaves or very small leaves, whereas others (e.g., agaves) store water mainly in the leaves. Most succulents have deep or broad root systems and are native

  • succus entericus

    Intestinal juice, clear to pale yellow, watery secretion composed of hormones, digestive enzymes, mucus, and neutralizing substances released from the glands and mucous-membrane lining of the small and large intestines. Intestinal juice neutralizes hydrochloric acid coming from the stomach;

  • Suceava (Romania)

    Suceava, city, capital of Suceava jude? (county), northeastern Romania. Founded on a terrace above the right bank of the Suceava River before the 14th century, it was the capital of Moldavia from 1388 until 1564, when the capital was moved to Ia?i. During the reign of Stephen (?tefan) the Great in

  • Suceava (county, Romania)

    Suceava, jude? (county), northeastern Romania, and bounded on the north by Ukraine. The Eastern Carpathian Mountains and the sub-Carpathians occupy the western two-thirds of the county, and the Suceava Plateau lies in the east. The Siret River flows southeastward, marking the county’s eastern

  • Sucellos (Celtic deity)

    Sucellus, powerful and widely worshiped Celtic god; his iconographic symbols were usually his mallet and libation saucer, indicative of his powers of protection and provision. His Irish equivalent seems to have been the Dagda. Sucellus was possibly one of the Gaulish gods who were equated by

  • Sucellus (Celtic deity)

    Sucellus, powerful and widely worshiped Celtic god; his iconographic symbols were usually his mallet and libation saucer, indicative of his powers of protection and provision. His Irish equivalent seems to have been the Dagda. Sucellus was possibly one of the Gaulish gods who were equated by

  • sucesión presidencial en 1910, La (work by Madero)

    Francisco Madero: …immensely successful book by Madero, La sucesión presidencial en 1910 (1908; “The Presidential Succession in 1910”), in which he called for honest elections, mass participation in the political process, and no reelection to the office of president. The political scene became even more hectic when Díaz changed his mind in…

  • Such a Long Journey (novel by Mistry)

    Rohinton Mistry: Mistry’s debut novel, Such a Long Journey (1991; film version, 1998), is an intricate tale of the triumphs and disasters of a kindhearted bank clerk’s friends and family set in India in 1971, a time of domestic turbulence and war with Pakistan. The book received the Governor-General’s Award,…

  • Such Is Life (novel by Furphy)

    Australian literature: Nationalism and expansion: …wrote a large complex novel, Such Is Life (1903), describing the rural world of the 1880s. It overflows with details of station life, the conversations of bullock drivers, nationalistic sentiments, and philosophical meditations about chance and determinism.

  • Such, Such Were the Joys (essay by Orwell)

    George Orwell: Early life: …his posthumously published autobiographical essay, Such, Such Were the Joys (1953).

  • Suchan (Russia)

    Partizansk, city, Primorsky kray (territory), far eastern Russia. It lies in the valley of the Partizanskaya River. It was formed in 1932 by the amalgamation of mining settlements that developed near mine shafts in a bituminous coal basin. A thermal power station serving the region is located in

  • Sucharita Mishra (Indian philosopher)

    Indian philosophy: Principal texts and relation to Shabara: …wrote was commented upon by Sucharita Mishra in his Kashika (“The Shining”), by Someshvara Bhatta in his Nyayasudha (“The Nectar of Logic”), and by Parthasarathi Mishra in Nyayaratnakara (“The Abode of Jewels of Logic”). Parthasarathi’s Shastradipika (“Light on the Scripture”) is a famous independent Mimamsa treatise belonging to Kumarila’s school.

  • Suchart Sawatsi (Thai writer, artist, and editor)

    Thai literature: …writer, artist, and prolific editor Suchart Sawatsi set up the groundbreaking literary journal Lok nangsu’ (1977–83; “Book World”), which, with its eclectic combination of articles, interviews, reviews, short stories, and poems, covering both the Thai and international literary world, provided a real and challenging focus for all who aspired to…

  • Süchbaatar (Mongolia)

    Sühbaatar, town, northern Mongolia, situated about 160 miles (260 km) north-northwest of the capital Ulaanbaatar at the confluence of the Orhon and Selenga rivers. Sühbaatar was founded in 1940 at the head of navigation on the Selenga. The town is named after the Mongolian revolutionary leader

  • Suchem, Ludolph van (European traveler)

    Damascus: Character of the city: …In 1350 a European traveler, Ludolph van Suchem, wrote of the city as “begirt with gardens and orchards and watered in and out by waters, rivers, brooks, and fountains cunningly arranged to minister to men’s luxury.” While the accelerated and often disordered growth of the city since World War II…

  • Suchet, David (British actor)

    Hercule Poirot: …an exquisite touch by actor David Suchet in the television series Agatha Christie: Poirot. Suchet was also featured as Poirot in video games.

  • Suchet, Louis-Gabriel, duc d’Albufera da Valencia (French marshal)

    Louis-Gabriel Suchet, duke d’Albufera da Valencia, marshal of France, one of the most brilliant of Napoleon’s generals, most notably as commander of the Aragon armies in the Peninsular War. The son of a Lyon silk manufacturer, Suchet originally had intended to follow his father’s business; but,

  • Suchinda Kraprayoon (prime minister of Thailand)

    Bhumibol Adulyadej: …Thai government and army chief Suchinda Kraprayoon assumed the prime ministership, mass protests again ensued and again were met with violence. Bhumibol intervened, summoning Suchinda and opposition leader Chamlong Srimuang to a televised meeting, during which the king called for the violence to end. Suchinda subsequently resigned, and a caretaker…

  • Suchocka, Hanna (prime minister of Poland)

    Hanna Suchocka, Polish politician who served as the first woman prime minister of Poland (1992–93). The daughter of a pharmacist, Suchocka specialized in constitutional law at the University of Adam Mickiewicz in Poznań, from which she graduated in 1968. She lectured in law there and at the

  • Suchomimus tenerensis (dinosaur)

    Paul Sereno: …bizarre new species of theropod, Suchomimus tenerensis, an 11-metre (36-foot) member of the spinosaur family that fed mainly on fish. Suchomimus sported a narrow skull with hooked teeth for grasping prey as well as a half-metre sail on its back. During a 2000 expedition to Niger, Sereno and his team…

  • Suchos (Egyptian god)

    Sebek, in ancient Egyptian religion, crocodile god whose chief sanctuary in Fayyūm province included a live sacred crocodile, Petsuchos (Greek: “He Who Belongs to Suchos”), in whom the god was believed to be incarnate. Sebek may have been an early fertility god or associated with death and burial

  • Süchow (China)

    Xuzhou, city, northwestern Jiangsu sheng (province), eastern China. It is located in a gap in the southern portion of the Shandong Hills that constitutes a southwestern extension of the North China Plain. Through this gap flows the Feihuang River (in a former riverbed of the Huang He [Yellow

  • Süchow language (Chinese language)

    Chinese languages: Suzhou: Suzhou vernacular is usually quoted as representative of the Wu languages. It is rich in initial consonants, with a contrast of voiced and voiceless stops as well as palatalized and nonpalatalized dental affricates, making 26 consonants in all. (Palatalized sounds are formed from nonpalatal…

  • Suchowljansky, Maier (American gangster)

    Meyer Lansky, one of the most powerful and richest of U.S. crime syndicate chiefs and bankers. He had major interests in gambling, especially in Florida, pre-Castro Cuba, Las Vegas, and the Bahamas. A Polish Jew born in Russia’s Pale of Settlement, Lansky immigrated with his parents to New York’s

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