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  • Suinin (emperor of Japan)

    Himiko: …the daughter of the emperor Suinin (fl. 1st century bc–1st century ad), who gave her custody of the sacred mirror, symbol of the sun goddess. In 5 bc she supposedly enshrined the mirror at Ise, a city of present Mie Prefecture.

  • Suiones (people)

    Sweden: …derived from the Svear, or Suiones, a people mentioned as early as 98 ce by the Roman author Tacitus. The country’s ancient name was Svithiod. Stockholm has been the permanent capital since 1523.

  • Suir, River (river, Ireland)

    River Suir, river in Ireland, rising in the Devil’s Bit Mountains and flowing south across the lowland of County Tipperary through Thurles to the foot of the Knockmealdown Mountains. There it receives the Tar and bends through an elbow-shaped loop to flow north around the western edge of the

  • Suisei (Japanese space probe)

    Halley's Comet: …two Japanese spacecraft (Sakigake and Suisei), two Soviet spacecraft (Vega 1 and Vega 2), and a European Space Agency spacecraft (Giotto) that passed only 596 km [370 miles] from the comet’s nucleus. Close-up images of the nucleus obtained by Giotto showed a dark potato-shaped object with dimensions of about 15…

  • Suishi (novel by ōe Kenzaburō)

    ōe Kenzaburō: In Suishi (2009; Death by Water) the writer Kogito Choko—ōe’s alter ego, who appears in previous works—attempts to pen a novel about his father’s death. ōe later published In reito sutairu (2013; “In Late Style”).

  • Suisse

    Switzerland, federated country of central Europe. Switzerland’s administrative capital is Bern, while Lausanne serves as its judicial centre. Switzerland’s small size—its total area is about half that of Scotland—and its modest population give little indication of its international significance. A

  • Suisun (people)

    Fairfield: …Suisun Bay, was inhabited by Suisun (Patwin) Indians, who were attacked by Spaniards in 1810. In the 1830s the Mexican governor gave local Indians a land grant known as Suisun Rancho. The settlement fared poorly, however, and the grant was sold. Fairfield was founded in 1856 by Robert Waterman, a…

  • suit (law)

    procedural law: Civil procedure: The rules of every procedural system reflect choices between worthy goals. Different systems, for example, may primarily seek truth, or fairness between the parties, or a speedy resolution, or a consistent application of legal principles. Sometimes these goals will be compatible with each…

  • suit (clothing)

    Suit, in dress design, matching set of clothes consisting, for example, of a coat, vest, and trousers. The shift in Western masculine attire from the doublet to the present-day suit began in the 1660s at the courts of Louis XIV of France and Charles II of England. The reformed style consisted of a

  • suit (playing cards)

    playing cards: Suits: The suitmarks of the international, or standard, deck indicate two black and two red suits—namely spades, clubs, hearts, and diamonds. The word spade probably represents the Old Spanish spado (“sword”), while club is a direct translation of basto, implying that Spanish suits were used…

  • suit of lights (dress)

    bullfighting: Act one: The matadors wear the traje de luces, or suit of lights, consisting of a short jacket, a waistcoat, and knee-length skintight trousers of silk and satin, richly beaded and embroidered in gold, silver, or coloured silk (the trousers are skintight so no folds or drapes may be caught on…

  • suit, joinder of (law)

    joinder and impleader: Joinder of suit occurs when two or more issues are dispensed within the same hearing. Any defendant who claims that a third party may have a portion (or more) of the liability claimed by the plaintiff has the right to bring that third party into…

  • Suita (Japan)

    Suita, city, ōsaka fu (urban prefecture), west-central Honshu, Japan. It is situated on the Yodo River, on the northern border of ōsaka city. Suita developed as a river port and post town in the early Edo (Tokugawa) era (1603–1867). Industrialization began in the late 19th century when a large beer

  • Suitable Boy, A (novel by Seth)

    Vikram Seth: He turned to prose in A Suitable Boy, which depicts relations between four Indian families. The book’s compelling narrative and great length invited critical comparisons to Leo Tolstoy, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, Honoré de Balzac, and Charles Dickens. His next novel, An Equal Music (1999), is a love story set…

  • suite (music)

    Suite, in music, a group of self-contained instrumental movements of varying character, usually in the same key. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the period of its greatest importance, the suite consisted principally of dance movements. In the 19th and 20th centuries the term also referred more

  • Suite 347 (work by Picasso)

    Pablo Picasso: Early years: …etchings and engravings known as Suite 347 (1968).

  • Suite bergamasque (work by Debussy)

    Suite bergamasque, four-movement suite for piano by French composer Claude Debussy, begun in 1890, when the composer was a student, and revised and published in 1905. Its most readily recognizable segment is the third movement, the ever-popular “Clair de lune” (“Moonlight”). The work’s title

  • Suite by Chance (dance by Cunningham)

    Merce Cunningham: …was thus determined, and in Suite by Chance (1953) the movement patterns themselves were so constructed. Suite by Chance was also the first modern dance performed to an electronic score, which was commissioned from American experimental composer Christian Wolff. Symphonie pour un homme seul (1952; later called Collage) was performed…

  • Suite Fran?aise (film by Dibb [2014])

    Michelle Williams: …returned to the screen in Suite Fran?aise (2014), in which she portrayed a woman drawn to a Nazi officer in occupied France during World War II. In 2016 she starred in the Broadway production of Blackbird, playing a woman who seeks out the man who sexually abused her when she…

  • Suite o Bairnsangs (work by Musgrave)

    Thea Musgrave: In 1953 her first commission, Suite o’ Bairnsangs (for voice and piano), was performed in Braemar, Scotland, followed the next year by a Scottish BBC performance of Cantata for a Summer’s Day. These and other early works were chiefly diatonic and suggestive of Scottish or medieval themes. Soon she turned…

  • Suites for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1007-1012 (work by Bach)

    Suites for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1007–1012, collection of six suites for solo cello written about 1720 by Johann Sebastian Bach. They are noted for their rich texture and emotional resonance. Although the suite had developed as a genre much earlier, it did not gain prominence until the Baroque

  • Suits (American television series)

    Katherine Heigl: …role on the legal series Suits.

  • Suits, Gustav (Estonian author)

    Estonian literature: …group, whose leader, a poet, Gustav Suits, devised the slogan “More European culture! Be Estonians but remain Europeans!” For Suits and his followers this meant greater attention to form. With the Russian Revolution of 1917 emerged the Siuru group (named after a bird in Finno-Ugrian mythology). These Neoromantic poets reacted…

  • Suittes (canton, Switzerland)

    Schwyz, canton, central Switzerland, traversed by the valleys of the Muota and the Sihl. More than three-quarters of the canton is reckoned as productive (forests covering about 92 square miles [238 square km]), and about 25 square miles (65 square km) are occupied by lakes, chiefly parts of Lakes

  • Suizenji Park (park, Kumamoto, Japan)

    Kumamoto: …for its castle and for Suizenji Park, which is one of the three most famous gardens in Japan. The original castle, partly destroyed in 1877, was restored in 1960. The castle contains a museum of city history, with ancient Japanese armour and other relics. Suizenji Park was completed in 1632…

  • ?uja (Russia)

    Shuya, city and centre of a rayon (sector), Ivanovo oblast (region), western Russia, lying along the Teza River. Originally a trading centre dating from the 16th century, the city now has numerous industries, including cotton and synthetic fabric processing, machine building, and various light

  • Sujanganj (India)

    Bhagalpur, city, southeastern Bihar state, northeastern India. It lies just south of the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 30 miles (50 km) east of Jamalpur. The city has major road and rail connections and trades in agricultural produce and cloth. Major industries include rice and sugar milling and

  • Sujech’?n (Korean music)

    Korean music: Court instrumental music: …(hyang’ak) plays pieces such as Sujech’?n (“Long Life as Immeasurable as the Sky”), one hears a more indigenous combination of the hourglass drum, oboes, flutes, fiddles, and the special bowed zithers (ajaeng).

  • Suk, Josef (Czech violinist, violist, and conductor)

    Josef Suk, Czech violinist, violist, and conductor (born Aug. 8, 1929, Prague, Czech.—died July 6, 2011, Prague, Cz.Rep.), applied a mellow but highly technical and intellectual style to his playing as he carried on the musical traditions of his grandfather, the violinist and composer Josef Suk,

  • Sukabumi (Indonesia)

    Sukabumi, kota (city), West Java (Jawa Barat) propinsi (or provinsi; province), western Indonesia. It lies at the foot of Mount Pangrango 50 miles (80 km) south of Jakarta, the national capital. Roads and railways link Sukabumi with the cities of Bogor and Jakarta to the north and Bandung to the

  • Sukarela Tentara Pembela Tanah Air (Indonesian organization)

    Indonesia: Japanese occupation: The Sukarela Tentara Pembela Tanah Air (Peta; “Volunteer Army of Defenders of the Homeland”) would become the core military force of the Indonesian revolution.

  • Sukarnapura (Indonesia)

    Jayapura, city and capital of Papua propinsi (or provinsi; province), eastern Indonesia, on the northern coast of the island of New Guinea. It is a port on Yos Sudarso (Humboldt) Bay at the foot of Mount Cycloop (7,087 feet [2,160 metres]). During World War II the Japanese established an air base

  • Sukarno (president of Indonesia)

    Sukarno, leader of the Indonesian independence movement and Indonesia’s first president (1949–66), who suppressed the country’s original parliamentary system in favour of an authoritarian “Guided Democracy” and who attempted to balance the Communists against the army leaders. He was deposed in 1966

  • Sukarno, Puntjak (mountain peak, Indonesia)

    Jaya Peak, highest peak on the island of New Guinea, in the Sudirman Range, western central highlands. Located in the Indonesian province of Papua, the 16,024-foot (4,884-metre) summit is the highest in the southwestern Pacific and the highest island peak in the world. It marks the terminus of a

  • Sukebator, Damdiny (Mongolian leader)

    Damdiny Sühbaatar, cofounder and leader of the Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party, who was the major force in the founding of the communist Mongolian People’s Republic. Sühbaatar joined the army as a young man, trained as a machine gunner, and received the honorific title Baatar (“Hero”) for

  • Sukei period (Japanese history)

    Asuka period, in Japanese history and art, the era from 552 to 645 ce, which began with the introduction of Buddhism from Korea and culminated in the adoption of a Chinese pattern of government. Initially opposed by conservative clans, Buddhism found favour with the powerful Soga family, which

  • Sukenik, Eliezer (Israeli archaeologist)

    Eliezer Sukenik, Polish-born Israeli archaeologist who identified the antiquity of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Sukenik settled in Palestine in 1912 and was drawn to archaeology while studying at the Hebrew Teachers Seminary and the French Biblical and Archaeological School at Jerusalem. After earning

  • Sukenik, Eliezer Lipa (Israeli archaeologist)

    Eliezer Sukenik, Polish-born Israeli archaeologist who identified the antiquity of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Sukenik settled in Palestine in 1912 and was drawn to archaeology while studying at the Hebrew Teachers Seminary and the French Biblical and Archaeological School at Jerusalem. After earning

  • Sukenik, Yigael (Israeli general and archaeologist)

    Yigael Yadin, Israeli archaeologist and military leader noted for his work on the Dead Sea Scrolls. Yadin, the son of an archaeologist, was educated at Hebrew University (M.A., 1945; Ph.D., 1955). He was a member of the Haganah military organization from 1932 to 1948 and served as chief of the

  • Sukeroku Yukari no Edo zakura (play by Tsuuchi Jihei II)

    Japanese performing arts: Tokugawa period: In the play Sukeroku yukari no Edo zakura (Sukeroku: Flower of Edo) written by Tsuuchi Jihei II in 1713, the two styles are blended most successfully. The hero, Sukeroku, is a swaggering young dandy and lover acted largely in the Edo style, while Sukeroku’s brother, Shimbei, is a…

  • Sukhavati (Buddhist belief)

    Sukhavati, (Sanskrit: literally “Land of Bliss” or “Pure Land of Bliss”; often translated as “Pure Land”) in the Pure Land schools of Mahayana Buddhism, the Western Paradise of the Buddha Amitabha, described in the Pure Land sutras (Sukhavati-vyuha-sutras). According to followers of the Pure Land

  • Sukhavati-vyuha-sutra (Buddhist text)

    Amitabha: As related in the Sukhavati-vyuha-sutras (the fundamental scriptures of the Pure Land sects), many ages ago a monk named Dharmakara made a number of vows, the 18th of which promised that, on his attaining buddhahood, all who had faith in him and who called upon his name would be…

  • Sukhavativyuha-sutra (Buddhist text)

    Amitabha: As related in the Sukhavati-vyuha-sutras (the fundamental scriptures of the Pure Land sects), many ages ago a monk named Dharmakara made a number of vows, the 18th of which promised that, on his attaining buddhahood, all who had faith in him and who called upon his name would be…

  • ?ukhayrah, Al- (seaport, Tunisia)

    La Skhira, seaport, eastern Tunisia. It is situated on the Gulf of Gabes, in Al-Sā?il region. La Skhira is one of the six major seaports of Tunisia; it is specialized in handling Algerian and Tunisian petroleum exports. The port is also a pipeline terminal for Al-Dūlāb oil field, in western

  • Sükhbaatar (Mongolia)

    Sühbaatar, town, northern Mongolia, situated about 160 miles (260 km) north-northwest of the capital Ulaanbaatar at the confluence of the Orhon and Selenga rivers. Sühbaatar was founded in 1940 at the head of navigation on the Selenga. The town is named after the Mongolian revolutionary leader

  • Sükhbaatar, Damdiny (Mongolian leader)

    Damdiny Sühbaatar, cofounder and leader of the Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party, who was the major force in the founding of the communist Mongolian People’s Republic. Sühbaatar joined the army as a young man, trained as a machine gunner, and received the honorific title Baatar (“Hero”) for

  • Sukhoi Su-27 (Soviet aircraft)

    Sukhoi Su-27, Russian air-superiority fighter plane, introduced into the air forces of the Soviet Union beginning in 1985 and now one of the premier fighters of Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Indonesia, India, China, and Vietnam. Versions of the plane are built under license in

  • Sukhoi SU-7 Fitter (Soviet aircraft)

    attack aircraft: …West by the NATO-assigned name Fitter), a single-seat, single-engine aircraft that entered service in the late 1950s and was progressively improved after that time. Soviet development efforts culminated in the late 1970s and ’80s with the MiG-27 Flogger-D and the Sukhoi Su-25 Frogfoot. Late in the Cold War standoff, the…

  • Sukhomlinov, Vladimir Aleksandrovich (Russian general and statesman)

    Vladimir Aleksandrovich Sukhomlinov, Russian general and minister of war who was largely responsible for Russia’s premature and unprepared entry into World War I. Sukhomlinov took part in the Russo-Turkish war as a cavalry commander (1877–78) and was head of the officers’ cavalry school in St.

  • Sukhona River (river, Russia)

    Russia: Rivers: …its tributaries the Vychegda and Sukhona) and the Pechora, and in Siberia the Indigirka and Kolyma. The Siberian rivers provide transport arteries from the interior to the Arctic sea route, although these are blocked by ice for long periods every year. They have extremely gentle gradients—the Ob, for example, falls…

  • Sukhothai (Thailand)

    Sukhothai, town and historical capital of a former kingdom of north-central Thailand. It is one of Thailand’s earliest and most important historical settlements. Originally a provincial town within the Angkor-based Khmer empire, Sukhothai in the 13th century gained its independence and became

  • Sukhothai Historical Park (historical park, Sukhothai, Thailand)

    Sukhothai: The result, the Sukhothai Historical Park, containing about 27 square miles (70 square km) of parkland and lying some 300 miles (450 km) north of Bangkok, was opened in the late 1980s. In 1991 Sukhothai was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site.

  • Sukhothai kingdom (historical kingdom, Thailand)

    Sukhothai kingdom, former kingdom, north-central Thailand. It was founded in the mid-13th century when a local Tai ruler led a revolt against Khmer rule. It remained only a small local power until its third ruler, Ramkhamhaeng, inherited the kingdom c. 1279. He extended its power to the south onto

  • Sukhothai style (iconography)

    Sukhothai style, one of the canonical styles for Buddha icons developed probably in the Tai kingdom of Sukhothai (modern Thailand), beginning in the 14th century. As the first of at least three major successive efforts by Tai kings to establish an “authentic” canon for the icons, the Sukhothai

  • Sukhovo-Kobylin, Aleksandr (Russian author)

    Russian literature: Other poets and dramatists: Aleksandr Sukhovo-Kobylin wrote a macabre trilogy, whose third play, Smert Tarelkina (1869; The Death of Tarelkin), is a brilliant piece of grotesque humour about a man who fakes his own death. The theme of the faked suicide, a motif of Russian drama, later appeared in…

  • Sukhoy (Russian design bureau)

    Sukhoy, Russian aerospace design bureau that is the country’s second most important producer of jet fighters (after the design bureau MiG). Sukhoy is part of a giant, partially state-owned conglomerate of design bureaus and production plants known as AVPK Sukhoy (Aviation Military-Industrial

  • Sukhoy S-37 (Russian aircraft)

    Sukhoy: Its fifth-generation, multirole, all-weather S-37 Berkut air-superiority fighter, first flown in 1997, was equipped with state-of-the-art electronics, forward-swept wings, and thrust vector control. In competition with MiG for the international market, Sukhoy also continued to develop the lightweight Su-54 fighter. In 1997 the Russian government formed AVPK Sukhoy by…

  • Sukhoy, Pavel O. (Soviet aircraft designer)

    Sukhoy: …the noted Soviet aircraft designer Pavel O. Sukhoy. In the 1920s and ’30s, as a senior engineer working for Andrey N. Tupolev’s Moscow-based design group of the Central Aerohydrodynamics Institute (TsAGI; see Tupolev), Sukhoy designed several bombers and fighters. In September 1939 the Soviet government appointed Sukhoy to head a…

  • Sukhumi (Georgia)

    Sokhumi, city, capital of Abkhazia, Georgia. It lies on the site of the ancient Greek colony of Dioscurias on the Black Sea coast. Sokhumi’s seaside location, beaches, and warm climate made it a popular Black Sea resort, with many sanatoriums and holiday camps. Local industries include fruit

  • sukiya style (Japanese architecture)

    Sukiya style, Japanese architectural style developed in the Azuchi-Momoyama (1574–1600) and Tokugawa (1603–1867) periods, originally used for teahouses and later also for private residences and restaurants. Based on an aesthetic of naturalness and rustic simplicity, buildings in this style are

  • sukiyaki (food)

    Sukiyaki, in Japanese cuisine, a dish of beef and vegetables prepared in the nabemono (one-pot) style. It is a fairly recent addition to Japanese cuisine. Because Buddhist law forbade the killing of quadrupeds for food, beef came into the Japanese diet only after sustained contact with the West

  • sukka (Judaism)

    Jewish religious year: Pilgrim festivals: …take their meals in the sukka (“booth”) but reside at home. A palm-tree branch (lulav), bound up together with myrtle (hadas) and willow (?arava) branches, is held together with a citron (etrog) and waved. Medieval exegetes provided ample (if not always persuasive) justification for the Bible’s choice of these particular…

  • Sukka (Mishna tractate)

    Jewish religious year: Pilgrim festivals: …recorded in the Mishna tractate Sukka, include the daily recitation of Hallel, daily circumambulation of the Temple altar, a daily water libation ceremony, and the nightly bet ha-sho?eva or bet ha-she?uvah (“place of water drawing”) festivities starting on the evening preceding the second day. The last mentioned featured torch dancing,…

  • sukkah (Judaism)

    Jewish religious year: Pilgrim festivals: …take their meals in the sukka (“booth”) but reside at home. A palm-tree branch (lulav), bound up together with myrtle (hadas) and willow (?arava) branches, is held together with a citron (etrog) and waved. Medieval exegetes provided ample (if not always persuasive) justification for the Bible’s choice of these particular…

  • sukkal-mah (Ur official)

    history of Mesopotamia: Administration: …of the state was the sukkal-mah, literally “supreme courier,” whose position may be described as “(state) chancellor.” The empire was divided into some 40 provinces ruled by as many ensis, who, despite their far-reaching authority (civil administration and judicial powers), were no longer autonomous, even if only indirectly, although the…

  • Sukkos (Judaism)

    Sukkoth, a Jewish autumn festival of double thanksgiving that begins on the 15th day of Tishri (in September or October), five days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is one of the three Pilgrim Festivals of the Hebrew Bible. The Bible refers to ?ag ha-asif (“Feast of the Ingathering,”

  • Sukkot (Judaism)

    Sukkoth, a Jewish autumn festival of double thanksgiving that begins on the 15th day of Tishri (in September or October), five days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is one of the three Pilgrim Festivals of the Hebrew Bible. The Bible refers to ?ag ha-asif (“Feast of the Ingathering,”

  • Sukkoth (Judaism)

    Sukkoth, a Jewish autumn festival of double thanksgiving that begins on the 15th day of Tishri (in September or October), five days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is one of the three Pilgrim Festivals of the Hebrew Bible. The Bible refers to ?ag ha-asif (“Feast of the Ingathering,”

  • Sukkur (Pakistan)

    Sukkur, city, Sindh province, southeastern Pakistan. The city lies on the west bank of the Indus River, connected with Rohri on the opposite bank by a cantilever bridge. Midstream between the two cities is the strategic island fortress of Bukkur. The old town contains many historic tombs and

  • Sukkur Barrage (barrage, Asia)

    Thar Desert: Economy: The Sukkur Barrage on the Indus River, completed in 1932, irrigates the southern Thar region in Pakistan by means of canals, and the Gang Canal carries water from the Sutlej River to the northwest. The Indira Gandhi Canal irrigates a vast amount of land in the…

  • Sukman, Harry (American composer and arranger)
  • Sukova, Helena (Czech tennis player)

    Martina Hingis: Partnered with Helena Sukova, Hingis became the youngest player ever to win at Wimbledon when the pair took the doubles title in 1996. Hingis’s decision to turn pro at such a young age, however, was controversial. Soon after her pro debut, the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) instituted…

  • sukr (?ūfism)

    ?āl: (4) In the ?āl of sukr (“intoxication”) the ?ūfī, while not totally unaware of the things that surround him, becomes half-dazed because his association with God dims his sight of other things. The overpowering sense of the beloved in this state destroys the mystic’s ability to distinguish between physical pain…

  • Suksaha (Chinese courtier)

    Kangxi: Early life: …was first administered by Sonin, Suksaha, Ebilun, and Oboi—four conservative Manchu courtiers from the preceding reign. One of the first political acts of the four imperial advisers was to replace the so-called Thirteen Offices (Shisan Yanmen) with a Neiwufu (Dorgi Yamun), or Office of Household. The Thirteen Offices, all organized…

  • Suku (people)

    Suku, people of southwestern Congo (Kinshasa) and northwestern Angola. They speak a Bantu language of the Niger-Congo group of languages. Suku women cultivate cassava (yuca) as the staple crop, and men hunt. The fundamental social unit is the matrilineage, a corporate group based on descent in t

  • Sukulumbwe (people)

    Ila, a Bantu-speaking people inhabiting an area west of Lusaka, the national capital of Zambia. The Ila-Tonga cluster consists of about 12 dialect groups, including the Lozi, Koba, Lenje, Tonga, Totela, Ila, and others. The Ila combine agriculture with animal husbandry. Men hunt, fish, and clear

  • Sukuma (people)

    Sukuma, Bantu-speaking people inhabiting the area of Tanzania south of Lake Victoria between Mwanza Gulf and the Serengeti Plain. By far the largest group in Tanzania, they are culturally and linguistically very similar to the Nyamwezi just south of them. The Sukuma have a mixed economy based

  • Sukumar, Raman (Indian ecologist)

    Raman Sukumar, Indian ecologist best known for his work on the behaviour of Asian elephants and how their presence has affected both human and natural environments. As a child growing up in Madras, Sukumar was dubbed vanavasi (the Tamil word for “forest dweller”) by his grandmother. It was during

  • Sukunabikona (Japanese deity)

    Sukunahikona, (Japanese: “Small Man of Renown”), in Japanese mythology, dwarf deity who assisted ōkuninushi in building the world and formulating protections against disease and wild animals. A god of healing and of brewing sake (rice wine), Sukunahikona is associated particularly with hot s

  • Sukunahikona (Japanese deity)

    Sukunahikona, (Japanese: “Small Man of Renown”), in Japanese mythology, dwarf deity who assisted ōkuninushi in building the world and formulating protections against disease and wild animals. A god of healing and of brewing sake (rice wine), Sukunahikona is associated particularly with hot s

  • Sukunahikona No Kami (Japanese deity)

    Sukunahikona, (Japanese: “Small Man of Renown”), in Japanese mythology, dwarf deity who assisted ōkuninushi in building the world and formulating protections against disease and wild animals. A god of healing and of brewing sake (rice wine), Sukunahikona is associated particularly with hot s

  • Sukur Cultural Landscape (area, Nigeria)

    Adamawa: The Sukur Cultural Landscape, which consists of a palace, villages, and the remains of an iron industry, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999. The state’s road system is limited. Yola, the site of a federal university of technology, is served by an airport,…

  • sul tasto (music)

    instrumentation: String techniques: …the bridge of the instrument), sul tasto (bowing on the fingerboard), the use of harmonics (dividing the string in such a way as to produce a high flutelike tone), col legno (striking the strings with the wood of the bow), and many special bowing techniques.

  • Sula (novel by Morrison)

    Sula, novel by Toni Morrison, published in 1973. It is the story of two black women friends and of their community of Medallion, Ohio. The community has been stunted and turned inward by the racism of the larger society. The rage and disordered lives of the townspeople are seen as a reaction to

  • Sula (islands, Indonesia)

    Sula, chain of islands in western North Maluku propinsi (province), Indonesia. They lie east of central Celebes and between the Molucca Sea (north) and Banda Sea (south). Three large islands, Taliabu (the largest), Mangole, and Sanana (or Sulabesi), and several smaller ones make up the chain. The

  • Sula bassana (bird)

    gannet: …species is the 100-cm (40-inch) northern gannet, Morus bassanus (or Sula bassana), sometimes called solan goose; it breeds on islands in Canada, Greenland, Iceland, and northeastern Europe, wintering to the Gulf of Mexico, Morocco, and the Mediterranean. The two slightly smaller southern species are the Cape gannet (M. capensis), which…

  • Sula dactylatra (seabird)

    pelecaniform: Reproduction: The masked booby (Sula dactylatra), for example, breeds in dense colonies on islets off Ascension Island but in dispersed patterns on Christmas Island (Pacific). Breeding in a number of species is normally dispersed; the red-footed cormorant (Phalacrocorax gaimardi) of South America, for instance, often nests on…

  • Sula nebouxii (bird)

    booby: The blue-footed booby (S. nebouxii) occurs in the Pacific from southern California to northern Peru and on the Galápagos Islands. Boobies’ bills are long, their bodies cigar-shaped, and their wings long, narrow, and angular. They fly high above the ocean looking for schools of fish and…

  • Sula sula (bird)

    booby: The red-footed booby (Sula sula) and the masked, or blue-faced, booby (S. dactylatra) are wide-ranging in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. The blue-footed booby (S. nebouxii) occurs in the Pacific from southern California to northern Peru and on the Galápagos Islands. Boobies’ bills are long,…

  • Sula, Kepulauan (islands, Indonesia)

    Sula, chain of islands in western North Maluku propinsi (province), Indonesia. They lie east of central Celebes and between the Molucca Sea (north) and Banda Sea (south). Three large islands, Taliabu (the largest), Mangole, and Sanana (or Sulabesi), and several smaller ones make up the chain. The

  • Sulabesi (island, Indonesia)

    Sula: Taliabu (the largest), Mangole, and Sanana (or Sulabesi), and several smaller ones make up the chain. The area of this group is about 1,875 square miles (4,850 square km). Taliabu and Mangole are separated by the narrow Capalulu Strait and are mountainous, thickly forested, and thinly populated. Taliabu has mountains…

  • Sulaiman Range (mountains, Pakistan)

    Sulaiman Range, mountain mass in central Pakistan, extending southward about 280 miles (450 km) from the Gumal Pass to just north of Jacobabad, separating Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Punjab from Balochistan. Its heights gradually decrease toward the south, with summits averaging 6,000–7,000 feet

  • Sulaimani (people)

    Baloch: …divided into two groups, the Sulaimani and the Makrani, separated from each other by a compact block of Brahui tribes.

  • Sulak (river, Russia)

    Caspian Sea: Shoreline features: The Sulak, Samur, Kura, and a number of smaller rivers flow in on the western shore of the middle and southern Caspian, contributing about 7 percent of the total flow into the sea. The remainder comes in from the rivers of the southern, Iranian shore. Apart…

  • Sulaka, John (Nestorian patriarch)

    Chaldean Catholic Church: …1551, when the elected patriarch John Sulaka went to Rome and made his profession of the Catholic faith. From this period on, those Nestorians who became Catholics were referred to as Chaldeans. Other unions were realized in 1672, 1771, and 1778, the current unbroken line of “patriarchs of Babylonia” originating…

  • Sulamani Temple (temple, Pagan, Myanmar)

    Pagan: …further developed in the great Sulamani Temple and culminated in the Gawdawpalin, dedicated to the ancestral spirits of the dynasty (late 12th century), whose exterior is decorated with miniature pagodas, the interior with extremely lavish, coloured surface ornament.

  • Sulawesi (island, Indonesia)

    Celebes, one of the four Greater Sunda Islands, Indonesia. A curiously shaped island with four distinct peninsulas that form three major gulfs—Tomini (the largest) on the northeast, Tolo on the east, and Bone on the south—Celebes has a coastline of 3,404 miles (5,478 km). Area including adjacent

  • Sulawesi Barat (province, Indonesia)

    West Sulawesi, propinsi (or provinsi; province), western Celebes (Sulawesi), Indonesia, bounded by Central Sulawesi (Sulawesi Tengah) to the north and northeast, South Sulawesi (Sulawesi Selatan) to the southeast, and Makassar Strait to the south and west. The capital is Mamuju, on the province’s

  • Sulawesi giant squirrel (rodent)

    squirrel: Natural history: …tropical squirrels, such as the Sulawesi giant squirrel (Rubrisciurus rubriventer) and the northern Amazon red squirrel (Sciurus igniventris), nest at middle levels but travel and forage low in the understory or on the ground. The African palm squirrels (genus Epixerus) are long-legged runners that forage only on the ground. Certain…

  • Sulawesi ground squirrel (rodent)

    ground squirrel: Tropical ground squirrels: The two species of Sulawesi ground squirrel (genus Hyosciurus) have elongated snouts and use their long, strong claws to dig for beetle larvae in rotting wood; they also eat acorns.

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