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  • Swiss Historical Village (tourist site, New Glarus, Wisconsin, United States)

    New Glarus: The Swiss Historical Village (established 1938) includes replicas of buildings in the original pioneer village, including a cheese factory and blacksmith and sausage shops. The Chalet of the Golden Fleece (built 1937), a replica Swiss chalet, houses a museum. Polkafest (music) and the Heidi Festival (drama)…

  • Swiss International Air Lines (Swiss airline)

    Swiss International Air Lines (SWISS), Swiss airline formed in 2002 following the bankruptcy of Swiss Air Transport Company Ltd. (Swissair). The airline serves cities in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and North and Latin America. Swissair was founded on March 26, 1931, in the merger of

  • Swiss literature

    Swiss literature, properly, the writings in the only language peculiar to Switzerland, the Rhaeto-Romanic dialect known as Romansh, though broadly it includes all works written by Swiss nationals in any of the three other languages of their country: German, French, and Italian, or the Swiss

  • Swiss National Park (national park, Switzerland)

    Swiss National Park, national park in Graubünden canton, southeastern Switzerland, adjoining the Italian border 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Saint Moritz. Established in 1914 and enlarged in 1959, the park occupies 65 square miles (169 square km) and is made up of a magnificent area in the Central

  • Swiss Pavilion (building, Shanghai, China)

    Expo Shanghai 2010: …Uluru/Ayers Rock landmark; that of Switzerland, which combined an urban-themed interior with a biodegradable soybean exterior curtain wall studded with photoelectric cells and a pasturelike grass roof; and that of Russia, which consisted of several irregularly shaped towers intended to evoke a fantasy city based on a work of children’s…

  • Swiss People’s Party (political party, Switzerland)

    Swiss People’s Party, conservative Swiss political party. The Swiss People’s Party (SVP) was founded in 1971 by the merger of the Farmers, Artisans, and Citizens’ Party—generally known as the Agrarian Party—with the Democratic Party. It has pursued conservative social and economic policies,

  • Swiss stone pine (tree)

    pine: Major Eurasian pines: The Eurasian stone pine (P. cembra) abounds on the Alps, the Carpathians, and the Siberian mountain ranges. The oily seeds are eaten by the inhabitants of the Alps and Siberia and yield a fine oil used for food. The wood is remarkably even-grained and is used…

  • Swiss War (Swiss history)

    Switzerland: Expansion and position of power: …ally Graubünden, thus igniting the Swabian (or Swiss) War. After several battles in Graubünden and along the Rhine from Basel to the Vorarlberg, peace was declared at Basel on September 22, 1499; the Swiss Confederation did not adhere to the decisions of Worms, but it remained a subject of the…

  • Swiss, King of the (Swiss military leader)

    Ludwig Pfyffer, Swiss military leader, spokesman for Roman Catholic interests in the cantons, and probably the most important Swiss political figure in the latter half of the 16th century. For many years an active and intrepid warrior in the service of France, Pfyffer won fame by safely leading the

  • Swiss-style yogurt

    dairy product: Yogurt: For blended (Swiss- or French-style) yogurt, the milk is allowed to incubate in large heated tanks. After coagulation occurs, the mixture is cooled, fruit or other flavours are added, and the product is placed in containers and immediately made ready for sale.

  • Swissair (Swiss airline)

    Swiss International Air Lines (SWISS), Swiss airline formed in 2002 following the bankruptcy of Swiss Air Transport Company Ltd. (Swissair). The airline serves cities in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and North and Latin America. Swissair was founded on March 26, 1931, in the merger of

  • Swissair flight 111 (aviation disaster, off the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada [1998])

    Swissair flight 111, flight of a passenger airliner that crashed on September 2, 1998, off the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, killing all 229 on board. The subsequent investigation determined that faulty wires caused the plane’s flammable insulation to catch fire. Swissair flight 111 was a regularly

  • Swissair Participation SA (Swiss holding company)

    Swiss International Air Lines: In 1981 the holding company Swissair Participation SA was created to run the nonairline subsidiaries, including hotel, restaurant, airline catering, real estate, travel agency, and freight operations.

  • Swisscom (Swiss company)

    Switzerland: Transportation and telecommunications: …dominated by Telecom PTT (renamed Swisscom in 1997), which enjoyed a legal government monopoly. However, during the late 1990s Swisscom, which is still partly government owned, lost its monopoly, and the sector was liberalized and opened to free competition. The telecommunications sector, regulated by the Swiss Federal Office of Communications…

  • Swisshelm, Jane Grey (American journalist)

    Jane Grey Swisshelm, American journalist and abolitionist who countered vocal and sometimes physical opposition to her publications supporting women’s rights and decrying slavery. Jane Grey Cannon taught lace making from 1823 to help support her family, and she became a schoolteacher at age 14. In

  • switch (instrument)

    Electric switch, device for opening and closing electrical circuits under normal load conditions, usually operated manually. There are many designs of switches; a common type—the toggle, or tumbler, switch—is widely used in home lighting and other applications. The so-called mercury, or “silent,”

  • Switch (film by Edwards [1991])

    Blake Edwards: Later films: Switch (1991), Edwards’s penultimate theatrical release, had an intriguing concept—an egomaniacal ladies’ man is killed by a jealous girlfriend and is reincarnated as a woman (Ellen Barkin)—but its execution was clumsy. Son of the Pink Panther (1993), Edwards’s final film, was yet another unsuccessful attempt…

  • switch hook (electronics)

    telephone: Switch hook: The switch hook connects the telephone instrument to the direct current supplied through the local loop. In early telephones the receiver was hung on a hook that operated the switch by opening and closing a metal contact. This system is still common, though…

  • Switch House (building, London, United Kingdom)

    museum: New museums and collections: The Switch House, Herzog & de Meuron’s addition (2016) for Tate Modern, designates only 40 percent of its space for the display of art.

  • switch selling (marketing)

    consumer advocacy: Controls on sales methods: …direct sales is that of switch selling, or “bait and switch.” The salesperson attracts buyers by placing an advertisement offering a domestic article at a remarkably low price; this is known as the bait. Inquirers are personally visited by a salesperson, who, from the outset, makes no attempt to sell…

  • Switchback Railway (ride, New York City, New York, United States)

    roller coaster: Coney Island amusement park: …hour, Thompson’s ride, called the Switchback Railway, was little more than a leisurely gravity-powered tour of the beach there. Still, its popularity enabled him to recoup his $1,600 investment in only three weeks.

  • switchboard

    telephone: Manual switching: …of a manually operated central switchboard. The manual switchboard was quickly extended from 21 lines to hundreds of lines. Each line was terminated on the switchboard in a socket (called a jack), and a number of short, flexible circuits (called cords) with a plug on both ends of each cord…

  • switched communications network

    telecommunications network: Switched communications network: A switched communications network transfers data from source to destination through a series of network nodes. Switching can be done in one of two ways. In a circuit-switched network, a dedicated physical path is established through the network and is held for…

  • switched network

    telecommunications network: Switched communications network: A switched communications network transfers data from source to destination through a series of network nodes. Switching can be done in one of two ways. In a circuit-switched network, a dedicated physical path is established through the network and is held for…

  • Switched-on Bach (album by Carlos and Folkman)

    electronic instrument: The electronic music synthesizer: Switched-on Bach, the music of J.S. Bach transcribed for Moog synthesizer and recorded by Walter Carlos and Benjamin Folkman in 1968, achieved a dramatic commercial success. In the years following the appearance of Switched-on Bach, many synthesizer recordings of traditional and popular music appeared, and…

  • switchgrass (plant)

    panicum: Switchgrass (P. virgatum) is an erect tough perennial, 1 to 2 metres (about 3.3 to 6.6 feet) tall, that grows in clumps; its spikelets may be reddish. It is a major constituent of tall grass prairie in North America and is a valuable forage grass.…

  • switching (communications)

    Switching, in communications, equipment and techniques for enabling any station in a communications system to be connected with any other station. Switching is an essential component of telephone, telegraph, data-processing, and other technologies in which it is necessary to deal rapidly with

  • switching centre (communications)

    electronics: Optoelectronics: …signals arrive at a central switching office in optical form, it has been attractive to consider switching them from one route to another by optical means rather than electrically, as is done today. The distances between central offices in most cases are substantially shorter than the distance light can travel…

  • switching office (communications)

    electronics: Optoelectronics: …signals arrive at a central switching office in optical form, it has been attractive to consider switching them from one route to another by optical means rather than electrically, as is done today. The distances between central offices in most cases are substantially shorter than the distance light can travel…

  • switching theory (technology)

    Switching theory, Theory of circuits made up of ideal digital devices, including their structure, behaviour, and design. It incorporates Boolean logic (see Boolean algebra), a basic component of modern digital switching systems. Switching is essential to telephone, telegraph, data processing, and

  • Switchman, The (work by Arreola)

    Juan José Arreola: “El guardagujas” (“The Switchman”) is Arreola’s most anthologized piece. It is without question his most representative. A stranded railroad traveler waits for months to board a train that never arrives, only to discover that schedules, routes, and even the landscapes seen from the windows of railroad cars…

  • Swithin, Saint (Anglo-Saxon saint)

    St. Swithin, ; feast day July 15), celebrated Anglo-Saxon saint, bishop of Winchester, and royal counselor whose name is still associated with an old meteorological superstition. He served as counselor to Kings Egbert and Aethelwulf of the West Saxons. On or about October 30, 852, he was

  • Swithun, Saint (Anglo-Saxon saint)

    St. Swithin, ; feast day July 15), celebrated Anglo-Saxon saint, bishop of Winchester, and royal counselor whose name is still associated with an old meteorological superstition. He served as counselor to Kings Egbert and Aethelwulf of the West Saxons. On or about October 30, 852, he was

  • Swithun, Saint (Anglo-Saxon saint)

    St. Swithin, ; feast day July 15), celebrated Anglo-Saxon saint, bishop of Winchester, and royal counselor whose name is still associated with an old meteorological superstition. He served as counselor to Kings Egbert and Aethelwulf of the West Saxons. On or about October 30, 852, he was

  • Switzer, Kathy (American runner)

    Boston Marathon: In 1967 Kathy Switzer, who had given her name as K.V. Switzer on the race application, was issued an official number and completed the marathon, although the race director tried to have her removed from the course. In 1972 the Boston Marathon became the first marathon race…

  • Switzerland

    Switzerland, federated country of central Europe. Switzerland’s administrative capital is Bern, while Lausanne serves as its judicial centre. Switzerland’s small size—its total area is about half that of Scotland—and its modest population give little indication of its international significance. A

  • Switzerland, flag of

    national flag consisting of a white cross on a red field. In keeping with heraldic tradition, Swiss flags on land are square in proportion.In the Middle Ages the pope frequently gave a special cross flag to a king or other ruler undertaking some military campaign in the name of Christianity. Other

  • Switzerland, history of

    Switzerland: History: Switzerland’s history is one of a medieval defensive league formed during a time and in an area lacking imperial authority. The different cantons (traditionally called Orte in German) were to a large extent independent states that remained united through the shared defense of liberty,…

  • swivel system (weaving)

    textile: Inlaid weave: …to hand brocading is called swivel, a system of figuring fabrics by using mechanically controlled pattern shuttles. The figures, inserted between ground-weft picks, interlace with the warp. The lappet system produces figured fabrics resembling those made by swivel figuring, but the pattern yarns are extra warps (rather than wefts) brought…

  • SWNT (chemical compound)

    fullerene: Carbon nanotubes: It was soon shown that single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) could be produced by this method if a cobalt-nickel catalyst was used. In 1996 a group led by Smalley produced SWNTs in high purity by laser vaporization of carbon impregnated with cobalt and nickel. These nanotubes are essentially elongated fullerenes.

  • SWOC (American labour union)

    United Steelworkers (USW), American labour union representing workers in metallurgical industries as well as in healthcare and other service industries. The union grew out of an agreement reached in 1936 between the newly formed Committee for Industrial Organization (CIO; later the Congress of

  • swollen shoot (plant disease)

    cacao: Pests and diseases: Swollen shoot is a viral disease transmitted to the plant by mealybugs that has devastated Ghanaian and Nigerian cocoa crops.

  • swollen-thorn acacia (tree)

    Bagheera kiplingi: …it nests in or near swollen-thorn acacia trees, which serve as the spider’s primary food source. B. kiplingi is 5 to 6 mm (about 0.2 inch) long and has translucent brownish yellow to light yellow legs and a dark cephalothorax (prosoma), which in males is green in the front and…

  • Swoopes, Sheryl (American basketball player)

    Sheryl Swoopes, American basketball player who won three Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) Most Valuable Player (MVP) awards (2000, 2002, and 2005) and four WNBA titles (1997–2000) as a member of the Houston Comets. After being named the 1991 national Junior College Player of the Year,

  • Swoopes, Sheryl Denise (American basketball player)

    Sheryl Swoopes, American basketball player who won three Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) Most Valuable Player (MVP) awards (2000, 2002, and 2005) and four WNBA titles (1997–2000) as a member of the Houston Comets. After being named the 1991 national Junior College Player of the Year,

  • Swope, Gerard (American executive)

    Gerard Swope, president of the General Electric Company (1922–39; 1942–44) in the United States. He greatly expanded the company’s line of consumer products and pioneered profit-sharing and other benefits programs for its employees. Fascinated by electricity early in life, Swope graduated from the

  • Swope, Herbert Bayard (American journalist)

    Herbert Bayard Swope, journalist who became famous as a war correspondent and editor of the New York World. After graduation from high school, Swope spent a year in Europe before going to work as a reporter for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He later went to the Chicago Tribune, then the New York

  • sword (bullfighting)

    bullfighting: The rise of professional bullfighting: …and popularized use of the estoque, the sword still used in the kill, and the muleta, the small red flannel cloth draped over a 22-inch (56-cm) stick that forms the small cape used in the bullfight’s final act. Romero was famous for executing the more dangerous, dramatic, and difficult of…

  • sword (weapon)

    Sword, preeminent hand weapon through a long period of history. It consists of a metal blade varying in length, breadth, and configuration but longer than a dagger and fitted with a handle or hilt usually equipped with a guard. The sword became differentiated from the dagger during the Bronze Age

  • Sword Beach (World War II)

    Sword Beach, the easternmost beach of the five landing areas of the Normandy Invasion of World War II. It was assaulted on June 6, 1944 (D-Day of the invasion), by units of the British 3rd Division, with French and British commandos attached. Shortly after midnight on D-Day morning, elements of the

  • sword dance

    Sword dance, folk dance performed with swords or swordlike objects, displaying themes such as human and animal sacrifice for fertility, battle mime, and defense against evil spirits. There are several types. In linked-sword, or hilt-and-point, dances, performers hold the hilt of their own sword and

  • Sword of Damocles (Greek legend)

    Damocles: …the legend of the “Sword of Damocles.”

  • Sword of Honour (trilogy by Waugh)

    Sword of Honour, trilogy of novels by Evelyn Waugh, published originally as Men at Arms (1952), Officers and Gentlemen (1955), and Unconditional Surrender (1961; U.S. title, The End of the Battle). Waugh reworked the novels and published them collectively in one volume as Sword of Honour in 1965.

  • Sword of the Spirit (religious and political group)

    Arthur Hinsley: …October 1940 he founded the Sword of the Spirit, a politico-religious group that comprised not only Roman Catholics but also the Churches of England and Scotland, as well as the Free Churches, in its efforts to rally British churchmen against totalitarianism. Hinsley criticized the negative stand of Pope Pius XI…

  • Sword of Trust (film by Shelton [2019])

    Marc Maron: …of movies in 2019, including Sword of Trust, in which he starred as a pawnshop owner, and Joker, a gritty origin story about the iconic Batman villain.

  • sword swallowing (magician’s trick)

    Sword swallowing, a magician’s trick dating back to ancient Greece and Rome, involving the swallowing of a sword without bodily injury. Capuleius, in his Metamorphoseon, tells of seeing the trick in Athens, performed by a juggler on horseback. In reality, sword swallowing is not an illusion or

  • sword-bearing cricket (insect)

    cricket: Sword-bearing, or winged bush, crickets (subfamily Trigonidiinae) are 4 to 9 mm long and brown and possess a sword-shaped ovipositor. They are characteristically found in bushes near a pond.

  • sword-billed hummingbird (bird)

    hummingbird: …quite short, but in the sword-billed hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera), it is unusually long, contributing more than half of the bird’s 21-cm length. The bill is slightly downcurved in many species, strongly so in the sicklebills (Eutoxeres); it is turned up at the tip in the awlbill (Avocettula) and avocetbill (Opisthoprora).

  • swordbill (bird)

    hummingbird: …quite short, but in the sword-billed hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera), it is unusually long, contributing more than half of the bird’s 21-cm length. The bill is slightly downcurved in many species, strongly so in the sicklebills (Eutoxeres); it is turned up at the tip in the awlbill (Avocettula) and avocetbill (Opisthoprora).

  • swordbill sturgeon (fish)

    paddlefish: Another species, the Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus gladius), was grouped in the family Polyodontidae before it was declared extinct by ecologists in 2020. It was larger and possessed a more slender snout. It inhabited the Yangtze River basin. The largest Chinese paddlefish grew up to 3 metres (9.8 feet)…

  • swordfish (fish)

    Swordfish, (Xiphias gladius), prized food and game fish, probably the single species constituting the family Xiphiidae (order Perciformes), found in warm and temperate oceans around the world. The swordfish, an elongated, scaleless fish, has a tall dorsal fin, and a long sword, used in slashing at

  • swordtail (fish)

    Swordtail, (Xiphophorus hellerii), popular tropical fish of the live-bearer family Poeciliidae (order Atheriniformes). The swordtail is an elongated fish, growing to about 13 centimetres (5 inches) long and characterized, in the male, by a long, swordlike extension of the lower tail fin lobe. The f

  • SWPC (United States government agency)

    space weather: Forecasting: government has developed a Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The SWPC is based in Boulder, Colo., and observes the Sun in real time from both ground-based observatories and satellites in order to predict geomagnetic storms. Satellites stationed at geosynchronous orbit…

  • SXSW (media conference, Austin, Texas, United States)

    South by Southwest, annual music, film, and interactive media conference held in Austin, Texas, U.S. South by Southwest (SXSW) began in 1987 as the South by Southwest Music and Media Conference when a promotion company, South by Southwest, Inc., decided to showcase the eclectic Austin music scene

  • Syacium papillosum (fish)

    flounder: …cm (29 inches); and the dusky flounder (Syacium papillosum), a tropical western Atlantic species. Flounders in those families typically have eyes and colouring on the left side. See also flatfish.

  • syādvāda (Jainism)

    Syādvāda, in Jaina metaphysics, the doctrine that all judgments are conditional, holding good only in certain conditions, circumstances, or senses, expressed by the word syāt (Sanskrit: “may be”). The ways of looking at a thing (called naya) are infinite in number. The Jainas hold that to

  • Syagrius (Roman ruler of Gaul)

    ancient Rome: Barbarian kingdoms: …Salian Franks (reigned 481/482–511), expelled Syagrius, the last Roman, from Soissons, took Alsace and the Palatinate from the Alemanni (496), and killed Alaric II, king of the Visigoths, at Vouillé (507). His conversion to Catholicism assured him the support of the bishops, and Frankish domination was established in Gaul. At…

  • Syama Sastri (Indian composer)

    Karnatak music: Syama Sastri.

  • Syariah law (Islamic law)

    Sharī?ah, the fundamental religious concept of Islam—namely, its law. The religious law of Islam is seen as the expression of God’s command for Muslims and, in application, constitutes a system of duties that are incumbent upon all Muslims by virtue of their religious belief. Known as the Sharī?ah

  • Sybaris (ancient city, Italy)

    Sybaris, ancient Greek city in southern Italy situated on the Gulf of Tarentum, near present Corigliano, Italy, known for its wealth and the luxury of its inhabitants, which contributed to the modern meaning of “sybaritic.” Founded c. 720 bc by Achaeans and Troezenians in a fertile area, the city

  • Sybel, Heinrich von (German historian)

    Heinrich von Sybel, German historian who departed from the dispassionate manner of his teacher Leopold von Ranke and made himself a spokesman of nationalistic political Prussianism. While studying in Berlin (1834–38), he learned from Ranke the critical method of evaluating historical sources, and

  • Sybil (American television miniseries)

    Joanne Woodward: …made-for-television movies, including the miniseries Sybil (1976), in which she played the doctor who treats a woman with multiple personalities played by Sally Field—a particularly apt role for Woodward considering her own film history. In 1978 she won an Emmy for her role as Betty Quinn in See How She…

  • Sybil, Temple of the (ancient temple, Rome, Italy)

    construction: Early concrete structures: …this concrete construction is the Temple of the Sybil (or Temple of Vesta) at Tivoli, built during the 1st century bce. This temple has a circular plan with a peristyle of stone columns and lintels around the outside, but the wall of the circular cella, or sanctuary room, inside is…

  • SYC (political organization, Somalia)

    eastern Africa: Pan-Somalism: …on May 13, 1943, the Somali Youth Club was formed in Mogadishu. Devoted to a concept of Somali unity that transcended ethnic considerations, the club quickly enrolled religious leaders, the gendarmerie, and the junior administration. By 1947, when it became the Somali Youth League, most of Somaliland’s intelligentsia was devoted…

  • sycamore (tree)

    Sycamore, any of several distinct trees. In the United States it refers especially to the American plane tree (Platanus occidentalis). The sycamore of the Bible is better termed sycamore fig (Ficus sycamorus; see also fig), notable for its use by ancient Egyptians to make mummy cases. The sycamore

  • sycamore fig (plant)

    Ficus: Major species: …notable Ficus species is the sycamore fig (F. sycomorus), which has mulberry-like leaves, hard wood, and edible fruit.

  • sycamore maple (plant)

    maple: The Sycamore maple (A. pseudoplatanus), an important shade and timber tree in Europe, has many ornamental varieties.

  • Sycamore Row (novel by Grisham)

    John Grisham: In Sycamore Row (2013)—a follow-up to A Time to Kill—Grisham returned to the racial politics that drove the events of the first novel, this time examining their impact on a case involving a contested will. Rogue Lawyer (2015) chronicles the adventures of a criminal defense attorney…

  • Sycamore Shoals, Treaty of (United States history)

    Cherokee: …Cherokee were persuaded at the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals to sell an enormous tract of land in central Kentucky to the privately owned Transylvania Land Company. Although land sales to private companies violated British law, the treaty nevertheless became the basis for the colonial settlement of that area. As the…

  • sycee (currency)

    tael: …taels; these were known as sycees and formed a considerable part of China’s bank reserves until 1933.

  • sycon (sponge physiology)

    sponge: Water-current system: …and the development of canals—ascon, sycon, and leucon. The simplest, or ascon, type, found only in certain primitive genera of the Calcarea (e.g., Leucosolenia), is characterized by an arrangement of choanocytes around a central cavity that directly communicates with the osculum. The walls of these sponges are thin, lack canals,…

  • sycon (sponge genus)

    Scypha, genus of marine sponges of the class Calcarea (calcareous sponges), characterized by a fingerlike body shape known as the syconoid type of structure. In the syconoid sponges, each “finger,” known as a radial canal, is perforated by many tiny pores through which water passes into a single

  • syconium (plant anatomy)

    fig: Physical description: Fig fruits, known as syconia, are borne singly or in pairs above the scars of fallen leaves or in axils of leaves of the present season. Flowers are staminate (male) or pistillate (female) and enclosed within the inflorescence structure. Long-styled female flowers are characteristic of the edible fruits of…

  • Sycotypus (snail genus)

    feeding behaviour: Types of food procurement: The snail Sycotypus attacks an oyster by stealth: waiting until the valves open, it thrusts its shell between the valves and pushes its tubular feeding organ, or proboscis, into the soft parts. Another snail, Natica, supports the scraping action of a filelike structure called a radula with…

  • Sydenham chorea (pathology)

    Sydenham chorea, a neurological disorder characterized by irregular and involuntary movements of muscle groups in various parts of the body that follow streptococcal infection. The name St. Vitus Dance derives from the late Middle Ages, when persons with the disease attended the chapels of St.

  • Sydenham of Sydenham and Toronto, Charles Poulett Thomson, Baron (British colonial governor)

    Charles Poulett Thomson, Baron Sydenham, merchant and statesman who, as British governor general of Canada in 1839–41, helped to develop that country’s basic institutions of government. The son of a merchant, Thomson joined the St. Petersburg office of his father’s firm at age 16. He was member of

  • Sydenham, Thomas (British physician)

    Thomas Sydenham, physician recognized as a founder of clinical medicine and epidemiology. Because he emphasized detailed observations of patients and maintained accurate records, he has been called “the English Hippocrates.” Although his medical studies at the University of Oxford were interrupted

  • Sydenstricker, Pearl Comfort (American author)

    Pearl S. Buck, American author noted for her novels of life in China. She received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938. Pearl Sydenstricker was raised in Zhenjiang in eastern China by her Presbyterian missionary parents. Initially educated by her mother and a Chinese tutor, she was sent at 15 to

  • Sydney (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Sydney, former city, ocean port, and since 1995 a constituent component of Cape Breton regional municipality, northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada. It lies on the southeastern arm of Sydney Harbour at the mouth of the Sydney River, on eastern Cape Breton Island. Founded in 1785 as a haven for loyalists

  • Sydney (New South Wales, Australia)

    Sydney, city, capital of the state of New South Wales, Australia. Located on Australia’s southeastern coast, Sydney is the country’s largest city and, with its magnificent harbour and strategic position, is one of the most important ports in the South Pacific. In the early 19th century, when it was

  • Sydney (atoll, Pacific Ocean)

    Phoenix Islands: The group comprises Rawaki (Phoenix), Manra (Sydney), McKean, Nikumaroro (Gardner), Birnie, Orona (Hull), Kanton (Canton), and Enderbury atolls. They have a total land area of approximately 11 square miles (29 square km). All are low, sandy atolls that were discovered in

  • Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport (airport, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

    New South Wales: Transportation: Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport, located near the city centre, is one of the oldest continually operating airports in the world and is very congested, handling both national and international traffic.

  • Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

    Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, athletic festival held in Sydney that took place September 15–October 1, 2000. The Sydney Games were the 24th occurrence of the modern Olympic Games. Sydney was narrowly chosen over Beijing as host city of the 2000 Olympics. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was

  • Sydney Airport (airport, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

    New South Wales: Transportation: Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport, located near the city centre, is one of the oldest continually operating airports in the world and is very congested, handling both national and international traffic.

  • Sydney Cove (cove, New South Wales, Australia)

    Sydney: Early settlement: He called it Sydney Cove, for the home secretary. Present-day Sydney Cove is still the city’s heart, though it is now more commonly known as Circular Quay.

  • Sydney Festival (Australian arts festival)

    Sydney Festival, large annual performing- and visual-arts festival held during three weeks in January in Sydney, Austl. It features music, dance, and a variety of theatrical performances. The first Sydney Festival was held in January 1977 with the goal of attracting Australians and others to Sydney

  • Sydney Film Festival (Australian film festival)

    Sydney Film Festival, film festival held annually in Sydney in June. It features a diverse range of movies from around the world. The University of Sydney hosted the first Sydney Film Festival in June 1954. It was a small three-day event with 1,200 tickets available. The first festival showed only

  • Sydney funnel-web spider (spider)

    funnel-web spider: The species Atrax robustus and A. formidabilis are large brown bulky spiders that are much feared in southern and eastern Australia because of their venomous bites. Several human deaths from the bites of these aggressive spiders have been recorded in the Sydney area since the 1920s. An…

  • Sydney Harbour (harbour, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

    Port Jackson, inlet of the Pacific, 12 miles (19 km) long with a total area of 21 square miles (55 square km), which is one of the world’s finest natural harbours and the principal port of New South Wales, Australia. It has minimum and maximum depths of 30 feet (9 metres) and 155 feet at low water,

  • Sydney Harbour Bridge (bridge, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

    Sydney Harbour Bridge, steel-arch bridge across Sydney Harbour (Port Jackson), Australia. The bridge, opened in 1932, serves as the primary transportation link between Sydney and its suburbs on the northern side of the harbour. It spans about 500 metres (1,650 feet), making it one of the longest

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