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  • syneresis (physics)

    gel: …liquid from it, is called syneresis. Compare sol.

  • synergid (plant anatomy)

    angiosperm: Pollination: …side of the egg (synergids). These synergids begin to degenerate immediately after pollination. Pollen tubes can reach great lengths, as in corn, where the corn silk consists of the styles for the corn ear and each silk thread contains many pollen tubes.

  • Synesius (Byzantine alchemist)

    alchemy: Hellenistic alchemy: Synesius, the latest author represented, lived in Byzantium in the 4th century. The earliest is the author designated Democritus but identified by scholars with Bolos of Mende, a Hellenized Egyptian who lived in the Nile Delta about 200 bc. He is represented by a treatise…

  • Synesius of Cyrene (Cyrenian bishop and philosopher)

    mystery religion: Mystery religions and Christianity: …the pagan writer and philosopher Synesius. The people of Cyrene selected him as the most able man of the city to be their bishop, and he was able to accept the election without sacrificing his intellectual honesty. In his pagan period he wrote hymns that closely follow the fire theology…

  • synesthesia (psychology)

    Synesthesia, neuropsychological trait in which the stimulation of one sense causes the automatic experience of another sense. Synesthesia is a genetically linked trait estimated to affect from 2 to 5 percent of the general population. Grapheme-colour synesthesia is the most-studied form of

  • syngamy (reproduction)

    Fertilization, union of a sperm nucleus, of paternal origin, with an egg nucleus, of maternal origin, to form the primary nucleus of an embryo. In all organisms the essence of fertilization is, in fact, the fusion of the hereditary material of two different sex cells, or gametes, each of which

  • syngas

    plasma arc gasification: Process: …gasification consist of the following:

  • Synge, J. M. (Irish author)

    J.M. Synge, leading figure in the Irish literary renaissance, a poetic dramatist of great power who portrayed the harsh rural conditions of the Aran Islands and the western Irish seaboard with sophisticated craftsmanship. After studying at Trinity College and at the Royal Irish Academy of Music in

  • Synge, John Millington (Irish author)

    J.M. Synge, leading figure in the Irish literary renaissance, a poetic dramatist of great power who portrayed the harsh rural conditions of the Aran Islands and the western Irish seaboard with sophisticated craftsmanship. After studying at Trinity College and at the Royal Irish Academy of Music in

  • Synge, R. L. M. (British biochemist)

    R.L.M. Synge, British biochemist who in 1952 shared the Nobel Prize for Chemistry with A.J.P. Martin for their development of partition chromatography, notably paper chromatography. Synge studied at Winchester College, Cambridge, and received his Ph.D. at Trinity College there in 1941. He spent his

  • Synge, Richard Laurence Millington (British biochemist)

    R.L.M. Synge, British biochemist who in 1952 shared the Nobel Prize for Chemistry with A.J.P. Martin for their development of partition chromatography, notably paper chromatography. Synge studied at Winchester College, Cambridge, and received his Ph.D. at Trinity College there in 1941. He spent his

  • syngenesis (geological process)

    loess: Origin and age.: In syngenesis, the accumulation of a mineral mass that is mainly of eolian origin and the acquisition of all loess properties occurs simultaneously, under the influence of soil formation. In protogenesis the accumulated mineral matter already has all the main loess properties because transport occurred subsequent…

  • syngenism (sociology)

    Ludwig Gumplowicz: He called this process syngenism. Initially, conflict arises between prepolitical racial groups. When one racial group has prevailed, it forms a state that becomes an amalgam of victor and vanquished. Wars then take place between states, and the process of conquest and assimilation occurs again, on a larger scale.…

  • Syngonanthus (plant genus)

    Eriocaulales: (485 species), Eriocaulon (400 species), Syngonanthus (195 species), and Leiothrix (65 species). About 30 species of Eriocaulon occur outside the tropics in Japan, about 8 occur in eastern North America, and only 1 (E. septangulare) is known in Europe.

  • Syngramma suevicum (work by Brenz)

    Johannes Brenz: …views of Martin Luther; in Syngramma Suevicum (1525) he expounded Luther’s doctrine of the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist.

  • Synket (music synthesizer)

    music synthesizer: …after, including the Buchla and Syn-Ket, the last approximately the size of an upright piano. Most synthesizers have had piano-like keyboards, although other types of performing mechanisms have been used. The Moog III, developed by the American physicist Robert Moog, had two five-octave keyboards that controlled voltage changes (and thus…

  • synod (Christianity)

    Synod, (from Greek synodos, “assembly”), in the Christian church, a local or provincial assembly of bishops and other church officials meeting to resolve questions of discipline or administration. The earliest synods can be traced to meetings held by bishops from various regions in the middle of

  • synodic month (astronomy)

    Metonic cycle: …there are 235 lunations, or synodic months, after which the Moon’s phases recur on the same days of the solar year, or year of the seasons. The cycle was discovered by Meton (fl. 432 bc), an Athenian astronomer. Computation from modern data shows that 235 lunations are 6,939 days, 16.5…

  • synodic period (astronomy)

    Synodic period, the time required for a body within the solar system, such as a planet, the Moon, or an artificial Earth satellite, to return to the same or approximately the same position relative to the Sun as seen by an observer on the Earth. The Moon’s synodic period is the time between

  • Synodical Government Measure of 1969 (religion)

    Convocations of Canterbury and York: With the Synodical Government Measure of 1969, most of the powers of the convocations, including the power to legislate by canon, passed into the hands of a general synod composed of members of the houses of bishops, members of the houses of clergy, and a house of…

  • Synodinos, Dimetrios Georgos (American television personality)

    James G. Snyder, ("JIMMY THE GREEK"; DIMETRIOS GEORGOS SYNODINOS), U.S. gambling oddsmaker and television personality whose success as a betting analyst won him an $800,000-a-year stint on the CBS sports show "NFL Today" that ended in 1988 because he made an ethnic slur (b. 1918--d. April 21,

  • Synodontidae (fish)

    Lizardfish, any of about 57 species of marine fish of the family Synodontidae, found primarily in the tropics. Lizardfish are elongated with rounded bodies and scaly heads. They grow to a maximum length of about 50 centimetres (20 inches) and are characteristically mottled or blotched to blend

  • synoikismos (ancient Greek polis formation)

    ancient Greek civilization: The beginnings of the polis: …by the Greeks themselves was synoikismos, literally a “gathering together.” Synoikismos could take one or both of two forms—it could be a physical concentration of the population in a single city or an act of purely political unification that allowed the population to continue living in a dispersed way. The…

  • Synonymisches Handw?rterbuch der deutschen Sprache (work by Eberhard)

    Johann August Eberhard: …in an abridged form as Synonymisches Handw?rterbuch der deutschen Sprache (1802; “Dictionary of Synonyms in the German Language”) and was republished in its 17th edition in 1910 with English, French, Italian, and Russian equivalents.

  • synonymous parallelism (Hebrew literature)

    biblical literature: Psalms: Synonymous parallelism involves the repetition in the second part of what has already been expressed in the first, while simply varying the words.

  • synonymy (reference work)

    Peter Mark Roget: …and philologist remembered for his Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (1852), a comprehensive classification of synonyms or verbal equivalents that is still popular in modern editions.

  • synonymy (linguistics)

    dictionary: Specialized dictionaries: …another genre, the dictionary of synonyms.

  • Synopsis historiarum (work by Scylitzes)

    John Scylitzes: …historian, the author of a Synopsis historiarum dealing with the years 811–1057.

  • Synopsis historike (work by Manasses)

    Constantine Manasses: …of a verse chronicle (Synopsis historike; “Historical Synopsis”).

  • Synopsis of the Astronomy of Comets, A (work by Halley)

    Edmond Halley: Later works: …astronomy, Halley published in 1705 A Synopsis of the Astronomy of Comets, in which he described the parabolic orbits of 24 comets that had been observed from 1337 to 1698. He showed that the three historic comets of 1531, 1607, and 1682 were so similar in characteristics that they must…

  • Synopsis of the Four Gospels (work by Aland)

    biblical literature: The two- and four-source hypotheses: …Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evangeliorum (1964; Synopsis of the Four Gospels, 1972), which includes the Gospel According to John and, as an appendix, the Gospel of Thomas, as well as ample quotations from noncanonical gospels and Jesus’ sayings preserved in the Church Fathers.

  • Synopsis Quattuor Evangeliorum (work by Aland)

    biblical literature: The two- and four-source hypotheses: …Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evangeliorum (1964; Synopsis of the Four Gospels, 1972), which includes the Gospel According to John and, as an appendix, the Gospel of Thomas, as well as ample quotations from noncanonical gospels and Jesus’ sayings preserved in the Church Fathers.

  • synoptic chart (meteorology)

    Weather map, any map or chart that shows the meteorological elements at a given time over an extended area. The earliest weather charts were made by collecting synchronous weather reports by mail. However, it was not until 1816 that German physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Brandes created the first

  • Synoptic Gospels (biblical literature)

    Synoptic Gospels, the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke in the New Testament, which present similar narratives of the life and death of Jesus Christ. Since the 1780s the first three books of the New Testament have been called the Synoptic Gospels because they are so similar in structure, content,

  • Synoptic Gospels, The (work by Montefiore)

    Claude Joseph Goldsmid Montefiore: …write an important commentary on the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Luke, and Mark).

  • synoptic map (meteorology)

    Weather map, any map or chart that shows the meteorological elements at a given time over an extended area. The earliest weather charts were made by collecting synchronous weather reports by mail. However, it was not until 1816 that German physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Brandes created the first

  • synoptic meteorology

    Sverre Petterssen: …the forces creating them, and synoptic meteorology, which uses charts and weather observations for the identification, study, and forecasting of weather.

  • Synoptic problem (biblical literature)

    Synoptic Gospels: This question, called the Synoptic problem, has been elaborately studied in modern times(see also Biblical literature: New Testament literature).

  • synoptic scale (meteorology)

    climate: Scale classes: …class is known as the synoptic scale. Spanning smaller distances, a few hundred to a few thousand kilometres, and possessing shorter lifetimes, a few to several days, this class contains the migrating cyclones and anticyclones that control day-to-day weather changes. Sometimes the planetary and synoptic scales are combined into a…

  • synoptic weather map (meteorology)

    Weather map, any map or chart that shows the meteorological elements at a given time over an extended area. The earliest weather charts were made by collecting synchronous weather reports by mail. However, it was not until 1816 that German physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Brandes created the first

  • synorchism (genital disorder)

    reproductive system disease: In the male: Synorchism, the fusion of the two testicles into one mass, may occur within the scrotum or in the abdomen. Cryptorchidism, the most common anomaly of the spermatic tract, is the failure of one or both of the testes to descend spontaneously into the scrotum; hormonal…

  • synovia (anatomy)

    osteoarthritis: …compounded by a reduction in synovial fluid, which acts as a natural joint lubricant and shock absorber.

  • synovial bursa (anatomy)

    bursa: Synovial bursas are thin-walled sacs that are interposed between tissues such as tendons, muscles, and bones and are lined with synovial membrane. In humans a majority of synovial bursas are located near the large joints of the arms and legs.

  • synovial chondromatosis (pathology)

    joint disease: Tumours of joints: In synovial chondromatosis, a benign condition, numerous cartilaginous nodules form in the soft tissues of the joint. The lesion is usually confined to one joint, particularly the knee, and occurs in young or middle-aged adults. It may or may not cause pain or swelling and usually…

  • synovial fluid (anatomy)

    osteoarthritis: …compounded by a reduction in synovial fluid, which acts as a natural joint lubricant and shock absorber.

  • synovial joint (anatomy)

    joint: Structure and elements of synovial joints: The synovial bursas are closed, thin-walled sacs, lined with synovial membrane. Bursas are found between structures that glide upon each other, and all motion at diarthroses entails some gliding, the amount varying from one joint to another. The bursal fluid, exuded by the…

  • synovial layer (anatomy)

    joint: The synovial layer: The inner layer of the articular joint capsule is called the synovial layer (stratum synoviale) because it is in contact with the synovial fluid. Unlike the fibrous layer, it is incomplete and does not extend over the articulating parts of the articular cartilages…

  • synovial membrane (anatomy)

    joint: The synovial layer: The inner layer of the articular joint capsule is called the synovial layer (stratum synoviale) because it is in contact with the synovial fluid. Unlike the fibrous layer, it is incomplete and does not extend over the articulating parts of the articular cartilages…

  • synovial osteochondromatosis (pathology)

    joint disease: Tumours of joints: …circumstance the lesion is called synovial osteochondromatosis. Like synovial chondromatosis, synovial osteochondromatosis is often a spontaneous or primary disorder of unknown cause. In many cases, however, it is a development secondary to other diseases of the synovium, such as rheumatoid arthritis and even osteoarthritis.

  • synovial sarcoma (pathology)

    joint disease: Tumours of joints: Synoviomas, or synovial sarcomas, are malignant tumours that arise in the tissues around the joints—the capsule, the tendon sheaths, the bursas, the fasciae, and the intermuscular septa, or divisions—and only rarely within the joint proper. Although they may occur at any age, they are most…

  • synovial tissue (anatomy)

    Synovial tissue, thin, loose vascular connective tissue that makes up the membranes surrounding joints and the sheaths protecting tendons (particularly flexor tendons in the hands and feet) where they pass over bony prominences. Synovial tissue contains synovial cells, which secrete a viscous

  • synovioma (pathology)

    joint disease: Tumours of joints: Synoviomas, or synovial sarcomas, are malignant tumours that arise in the tissues around the joints—the capsule, the tendon sheaths, the bursas, the fasciae, and the intermuscular septa, or divisions—and only rarely within the joint proper. Although they may occur at any age, they are most…

  • synovitis (pathology)

    joint disease: Inflammatory joint diseases: types of arthritis: …membrane) is referred to as synovitis. Arthralgias simply are pains in the joints; as ordinarily used, the word implies that there is no other accompanying evidence of arthritis. Rheumatism, which is not synonymous with these, does not necessarily imply an inflammatory state but refers to all manners of discomfort of…

  • synovium (anatomy)

    Synovial tissue, thin, loose vascular connective tissue that makes up the membranes surrounding joints and the sheaths protecting tendons (particularly flexor tendons in the hands and feet) where they pass over bony prominences. Synovial tissue contains synovial cells, which secrete a viscous

  • synroc (radioactive waste disposal)

    nuclear ceramics: High-level waste: …second-generation solid waste form is synroc, a ceramic synthetic rock. Synroc contains various titanate-mineral phases that have the capability of forming solid solutions with nearly all the radioactive species in HLW. Similar minerals exist in nature, where they have survived under demanding conditions for geologic time periods. The production of…

  • synsacrum (anatomy)

    bird: Skeleton: …to 23 fused vertebrae, the synsacrum, to which the pelvic girdle is fused. Posterior to the synsacrum is a series of free tail (caudal) vertebrae and finally the pygostyle, which consists of several fused caudal vertebrae and supports the tail feathers.

  • Synsepalum dulcificum (shrub and fruit, Synsepalum species)

    Miracle fruit, (Synsepalum dulcificum), evergreen shrub of the family Sapotaceae, grown for its mild fruits that make subsequently eaten sour foods taste sweet. The miracle fruit plant is native to tropical West Africa, where it is used locally to sweeten palm wine and other beverages. The

  • Syntactic Structures (work by Chomsky)

    Noam Chomsky: Rule systems in Chomskyan theories of language: The standard theory of Syntactic Structures and especially of Aspects of the Theory of Syntax employed a phrase-structure grammar—a grammar in which the syntactic elements of a language are defined by means of rewrite rules that specify their smaller constituents (e.g., “S → NP + VP,” or “a sentence…

  • syntagma (military formation)

    phalanx: …in the phalanx was the syntagma, normally 16 men deep. Each soldier was armed with the sarissa, a 13- to 21-foot spear; in battle formation, the first five ranks held their spears horizontally in front of the advancing phalanx, each file being practically on the heels of the men in…

  • Syntagma alphabeticum (work by Blastares)

    Matthew Blastares: …Blastares in 1335 compiled the Syntagma alphabeticum (“Alphabetical Arrangement”), a handbook of Byzantine church and civil laws that synthesized material from previous collections. It was almost immediately translated into Slavonic at the behest of King Stefan Du?an of Serbia and appeared in a Bulgarian version during the 15th century and…

  • Syntagma canonum (canon law)

    canon law: Eastern churches: This Syntagma canonum (“Body of Canons”), or Corpus canonum orientale (“Eastern Body of Canons”), was subsequently complemented by the canons attributed to other 4th- and 5th-century councils, canonical letters of 12 Greek Fathers and of the 3rd-century Latin bishop of Carthage, St. Cyprian, and the Constitutiones…

  • Syntagma musicum (work by Praetorius)

    wind instrument: Trumpet-type aerophones: …clearly depicted in Michael Praetorius’s Syntagma musicum (1619). Praetorius’s illustration of trombones, for example, features crooks inserted between the slide and bell sections. Terminal crooks were common on trumpets from the 17th through the 19th century. They were also used, singly and in combination, on the horn until the mid-18th…

  • Syntagma philosophiae Epicuri (work by Gassendi)

    Epicureanism: Epicureanism and egoism in modern philosophy: …the Syntagma philosophiae Epicuri (Treatise on Epicurean Philosophy), was issued posthumously at The Hague 10 years later. At the same time, in England, Thomas Hobbes, a friend of Gassendi, took up again the theory of pleasure and interpreted it in a dynamic sense, which was therefore closer to the…

  • Syntagma philosophicum (work by Gassendi)

    Pierre Gassendi: Skepticism and atomism: In his final Epicurean work, Syntagma philosophicum (“Philosophical Treatise”), published posthumously in 1658, Gassendi attempted to find what he called a middle way between skepticism and dogmatism. He argued that, while metaphysical knowledge of the “essences” (inner natures) of things is impossible, by relying on induction and the information provided…

  • Syntagma tōn tessarōn mathēmatōn (work by Pachymeres)

    George Pachymeres: …Constantinople’s academy evolved into the Syntagma tōn tessarōn mathēmatōn (“Compendium of Four Mathematics”), a type of classical handbook on mathematics, music, geometry, and astronomy. The Syntagma, with its innovative use of Arabic numbers, became the standard academic text in Greek Byzantine culture.

  • Syntaktische Forschungen (work by Delbrück)

    Berthold Delbrück: …in Sanskrit and Greek (Syntaktische Forschungen), which was the first thoroughly methodical and complete treatment of a problem in comparative syntax. He was professor of Sanskrit and comparative linguistics at the University of Jena (1873–1912). His great achievement was preparing the three volumes on syntax in Grundriss der vergleichenden…

  • syntax (grammar)

    Syntax, the arrangement of words in sentences, clauses, and phrases, and the study of the formation of sentences and the relationship of their component parts. In a language such as English, the main device for showing the relationship among words is word order; e.g., in “The girl loves the boy,”

  • Synteliidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Synteliidae 1 genus, a few species in Mexico and the Orient. Superfamily Hydrophiloidea (water scavenger beetles) Head usually with Y-shaped line on front; antennae short, hairy and club-shaped at end; habits mostly aquatic; maxillary palp usually longer than antennae; 6 families.

  • synteny (genetics)

    heredity: Synteny: Genomic sequencing and mapping have enabled comparison of the general structures of genomes of many different species. The general finding is that organisms of relatively recent divergence show similar blocks of genes in the same relative positions in the genome. This situation is called…

  • Syntexis libocedrii (insect)

    wood wasp: The cedar wood wasps, represented in North America by the species Syntexis libocedrii, are found in the Pacific coastal states. Adults are about 8 to 14 mm (0.3 to 0.5 inch) in length. The larva bores into the wood of the incense cedar, Calocedrus decurrens.

  • synthesis (mental process)

    mathematics: The three classical problems: …reversed procedure is called “synthesis.”

  • synthesis (philosophy)

    Synthesis, in philosophy, the combination of parts, or elements, in order to form a more complete view or system. The coherent whole that results is considered to show the truth more completely than would a mere collection of parts. The term synthesis also refers, in the dialectical philosophy of

  • synthesis gas (chemical compound)

    carbon monoxide: …and molecular hydrogen are called synthesis gas.

  • synthesis reaction

    Chemical synthesis, the construction of complex chemical compounds from simpler ones. It is the process by which many substances important to daily life are obtained. It is applied to all types of chemical compounds, but most syntheses are of organic molecules. Chemists synthesize chemical

  • synthesis stage (cytology)

    cell cycle: …stage), copies its DNA (synthesis, or S, stage), prepares to divide (gap 2, or G2, stage), and divides (mitosis, or M, stage). The stages G1, S, and G2 make up interphase, which accounts for the span between cell divisions. On the basis of the stimulatory and inhibitory messages a…

  • synthesis, chemical

    Chemical synthesis, the construction of complex chemical compounds from simpler ones. It is the process by which many substances important to daily life are obtained. It is applied to all types of chemical compounds, but most syntheses are of organic molecules. Chemists synthesize chemical

  • synthesizer

    Music synthesizer, machine that electronically generates and modifies sounds, frequently with the use of a digital computer. Synthesizers are used for the composition of electronic music and in live performance. The intricate apparatus of the sound synthesizer generates wave forms and then subjects

  • synthetase (biochemistry)

    Ligase, any one of a class of about 50 enzymes that catalyze reactions involving the conservation of chemical energy and provide a couple between energy-demanding synthetic processes and energy-yielding breakdown reactions. They catalyze the joining of two molecules, deriving the needed energy from

  • synthetic a posteriori proposition (philosophy)

    epistemology: Immanuel Kant: …squares have four sides,” (2) synthetic a posteriori propositions, such as “The cat is on the mat” and “It is raining,” and (3) what he called “synthetic a priori” propositions, such as “Every event has a cause.” Although in the last kind of proposition the meaning of the predicate term…

  • synthetic a priori proposition (philosophy)

    Synthetic a priori proposition, in logic, a proposition the predicate of which is not logically or analytically contained in the subject—i.e., synthetic—and the truth of which is verifiable independently of experience—i.e., a priori. Thus the proposition “Some bodies are heavy” is synthetic because

  • synthetic abrasive

    abrasive: Abrasive materials: their composition and properties: Synthetic abrasives, on the other hand, are the product of considerable processing of raw materials or chemical precursors; they include silicon carbide, synthetic diamond, and alumina (a synthetic form of corundum). Most natural abrasives have been replaced by synthetic materials because nearly all industrial applications…

  • synthetic ammonia process (chemistry)

    Haber-Bosch process, method of directly synthesizing ammonia from hydrogen and nitrogen, developed by the German physical chemist Fritz Haber. He received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1918 for this method, which made the manufacture of ammonia economically feasible. The method was translated

  • synthetic aperture radar (radar technology)

    radar: Radar imaging: …resolution, is the basis for synthetic aperture radar (SAR). SAR produces an image of a scene that is similar, but not identical, to an optical photograph. One should not expect the image seen by radar “eyes” to be the same as that observed by optical eyes. Each provides different information.…

  • synthetic biology

    Synthetic biology, field of research in which the main objective is to create fully operational biological systems from the smallest constituent parts possible, including DNA, proteins, and other organic molecules. Synthetic biology incorporates many different scientific techniques and approaches.

  • Synthetic Biology

    In March 2014 an international team of researchers described the synthesis of a redesigned, fully functional chromosome patterned after the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The breakthrough marked a major step forward in the field of synthetic biology, the primary objective of which was to create

  • synthetic colorant

    dye: Development of synthetic dyes: Perkin’s accidental discovery of mauve as a product of dichromate oxidation of impure aniline motivated chemists to examine oxidations of aniline with an array of reagents. Sometime between 1858 and 1859, French chemist Fran?ois-Emmanuel Verguin found that reaction of aniline

  • Synthetic Cubism (art)

    Georges Braque: Cubism: …1912 Picasso and Braque entered Synthetic Cubism, the phase in which subject matter became more central as the artists moved their forms out of the confusion of contrasting planes. That year Braque created what is generally considered the first papier collé by attaching three pieces of wallpaper to the drawing…

  • synthetic diamond (chemical compound)

    Synthetic diamond, man-made diamond that is usually produced by subjecting graphite to very high temperatures and pressures. Synthetic diamond resembles natural diamond in most fundamental properties, retaining the extreme hardness, broad transparency (when pure), high thermal conductivity, and

  • synthetic division (mathematics)

    Synthetic division, short method of dividing a polynomial of degree n of the form a0xn + a1xn ? 1 + a2xn ? 2 + … + an, in which a0 ≠ 0, by another of the same form but of lesser degree (usually of the form x ? a). Based on the remainder theorem, it is sometimes called the method of detached

  • synthetic DNA (bioengineering)

    synthetic biology: BioBricks and xeno-nucleic acids: …other scientists attempted to create synthetic DNA with an expanded genetic code that included new base pairs in addition to the naturally occurring pairs of A-T (adenine-thymine) and C-G (cytosine-guanine).

  • synthetic drug

    designer drugs: …drugs, in popular usage, illegal synthetic, laboratory-made chemicals. Although the term is not precisely defined, it is understood to refer to commonly abused drugs such as fentanyl, ketamine, LSD, PCP, quaaludes, methcathinone, and GHB (gammahydroxy butyrate), as well as to amphetamine derivatives such as Ecstasy (3,4, Methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA) and methamphetamine

  • synthetic dye

    dye: Development of synthetic dyes: Perkin’s accidental discovery of mauve as a product of dichromate oxidation of impure aniline motivated chemists to examine oxidations of aniline with an array of reagents. Sometime between 1858 and 1859, French chemist Fran?ois-Emmanuel Verguin found that reaction of aniline

  • synthetic fibre (chemical product)

    Synthetic fibre, man-made textile fibre produced entirely from chemical substances, unlike those man-made fibres derived from such natural substances as cellulose or protein. See Man-Made

  • synthetic gem (chemical compound)

    emerald: …long made to manufacture it synthetically. These efforts finally met with success between 1934 and 1937, when a German patent was issued to cover its synthesis. Synthetic emeralds are currently manufactured in the United States by either a molten-flux process or a hydrothermal method; in the latter technique, aquamarine crystals…

  • synthetic grease

    grease: Synthetic grease may consist of synthetic oils containing standard soaps or may be a mixture of synthetic thickeners, or bases, in petroleum oils. Silicones are greases in which both the base and the oil are synthetic. Synthetic greases are made in water-soluble and water-resistant forms…

  • synthetic human protein (biology)

    pharmaceutical industry: Synthetic human proteins: Another important milestone for medical science and for the pharmaceutical industry occurred in 1982, when regulatory and marketing approval for Humulin?, human insulin, was granted in the United Kingdom and the United States. This marketing approval was an important advancement because it…

  • synthetic insecticide (agriculture)

    insecticide: Environmental contamination and resistance: The advent of synthetic insecticides in the mid-20th century made the control of insects and other arthropod pests much more effective, and such chemicals remain essential in modern agriculture despite their environmental drawbacks. By preventing crop losses, raising the quality of produce, and lowering the cost of farming,…

  • synthetic language

    Synthetic language, any language in which syntactic relations within sentences are expressed by inflection (the change in the form of a word that indicates distinctions of tense, person, gender, number, mood, voice, and case) or by agglutination (word formation by means of morpheme, or word unit,

  • synthetic lava (chemical compound)

    Foam glass, lightweight, opaque glass material having a closed-cell structure. It is made in molds that are packed with crushed or granulated glass mixed with a chemical agent such as carbon or limestone. At the temperature at which the glass grains become soft enough to cohere, the agent gives

  • synthetic lubricant (chemistry)

    lubrication: Liquid, oily lubricants.: Synthetic lubricants generally can be characterized as oily, neutral liquid materials not usually obtained directly from petroleum but having some properties similar to petroleum lubricants. In certain ways they are superior to hydrocarbon products. Synthetics exhibit greater stability of viscosity with temperature changes, resistance to…

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