You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • synthetic manure (agriculture)

    Compost, crumbly mass of rotted organic matter made from decomposed plant material, used in gardening and agriculture. Compost is especially important in organic farming, where the use of synthetic fertilizers is not permitted. Compost improves soil structure, provides a wide range of nutrients for

  • synthetic organic pigment

    pigment: Synthetic organic pigments are derived from coal tars and other petrochemicals. Inorganic pigments are made by relatively simple chemical reactions—notably oxidation—or are found naturally as earths.

  • synthetic oxygen carrier

    blood doping: Synthetic oxygen carriers include perfluorocarbons and hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. These agents effectively transport and deliver oxygen to tissues and have been explored as oxygen carriers in blood-substitute products for purposes such as emergency blood transfusion. Synthetic oxygen carriers also became popular with athletes, although their…

  • synthetic parallelism (Hebrew literature)

    biblical literature: Psalms: Synthetic parallelism involves the completion or expansion of the idea of the first part in the second part.

  • Synthetic Philosophy, The (work by Spencer)

    Herbert Spencer: Life and works: …subscriptions for a comprehensive work, The Synthetic Philosophy, which was to include, besides the already-published Principles of Psychology, volumes on first principles and on biology, sociology, and morality. First Principles was published in 1862, and between then and 1896, when the third volume of The Principles of Sociology appeared, the…

  • synthetic proposition (philosophy)

    analytic proposition: …all bodies are heavy is synthetic, since the notion of weight supposes in addition to the notion of body that of bodies in relation to one another. In the 19th century Bernard Bolzano, a Prague logician and epistemologist, added a third category, the analytically false.

  • synthetic resin (chemical compound)

    resin: Synthetic resins comprise a large class of synthetic products that have some of the physical properties of natural resins but are different chemically. Synthetic resins are not clearly differentiated from plastics.

  • synthetic rock (radioactive waste disposal)

    nuclear ceramics: High-level waste: …second-generation solid waste form is synroc, a ceramic synthetic rock. Synroc contains various titanate-mineral phases that have the capability of forming solid solutions with nearly all the radioactive species in HLW. Similar minerals exist in nature, where they have survived under demanding conditions for geologic time periods. The production of…

  • synthetic rubber (chemical compound)

    rubber: Synthetic rubber production: Synthetic elastomers are produced on an industrial scale in either solution or emulsion polymerization methods. (Solution polymerization and emulsion polymerization are described in the article chemistry of industrial polymers.) Polymers made in solution generally

  • Synthetic Scots (Scottish literary movement)

    Hugh MacDiarmid: 9, 1978, Edinburgh), preeminent Scottish poet of the first half of the 20th century and leader of the Scottish literary renaissance.

  • synthetic single crystal (physics)

    single crystal: …often occur as single crystals; synthetic single crystals, especially silicon and gallium arsenide, are used in solid-state electronic devices such as integrated circuits and light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

  • synthetic theory of evolution (genetics)

    evolution: The synthetic theory: The rediscovery in 1900 of Mendel’s theory of heredity, by the Dutch botanist and geneticist Hugo de Vries and others, led to an emphasis on the role of heredity in evolution. De Vries proposed a new theory of evolution known as mutationism, which…

  • Synthetisches Cino der Malerei (manifesto by Hausmann)

    Raoul Hausmann: …later published the piece as Synthetisches Cino der Malerei (“Synthetic Cinema of Painting”). Both the anti-art Dada manifesto and Hausmann’s declaration on new media were recited before a riotous audience at the first event of the Berlin Dada Club, on April 12, 1918. The artists’ evening of performance and readings…

  • Synthetism (art)

    Synthetism, in art, method of painting evolved by Paul Gauguin, émile Bernard, Louis Anquetin, and others in the 1880s to emphasize two-dimensional flat patterns, thus breaking with Impressionist art and theory. The style shows a conscious effort to work less directly from nature and to rely more

  • syntropan (drug)
  • syntrophism (biology)

    Syntrophism, mutual dependence of different types of organisms for the satisfaction of their respective nutritional needs. The intermediate or end products of metabolism of one organism are essential materials for another. Syntrophism is exemplified in the mixed population of an ecosystem

  • Synura (algae genus)

    algae: Annotated classification: approximately 250 species; Mallomonas and Synura. Class Xanthophyceae (yellow-green algae) Primarily coccoid, capsoid, or filamentous; mostly in freshwater environments; about 600 species; includes Botrydium, Bumilleriopsis, Tribonema, and

  • Synurales (protist)

    protozoan: Annotated classification: Synurales Produce stomatocysts. Lack chlorophyll c2. Possess a unique flagellar root system. Eustigmatales Small unicells that are coccoid (nonmotile) in the vegetative phase. Cells can be single, paired, or colonial. Lack fucoxanthin and are yellow-green in colour; lack chlorophyll c. Motile cells contain a prominent

  • Synurophyceae (class of algae)

    algae: Annotated classification: Class Synurophyceae Previously placed in Chrysophyceae; silica-scaled; unicellular or colonial flagellates sometimes alternating with capsoid benthic stage; cells covered with elaborately structured silica scales; approximately 250 species; Mallomonas and Synura. Class Xanthophyceae (

  • synusia (botany)

    tropical rainforest: General structure of the rainforest: …be grouped into categories called synusiae, which make up distinct layers of vegetation. In tropical rainforests the synusiae are more numerous than in other ecosystem types. They include not only mechanically independent forms, whose stems are self-supporting, and saprophytic plants but also mechanically dependent synusiae such as climbers, stranglers, epiphytes,…

  • Synya (river, Russia)

    Ob River: Physiography: …Sosva, the Vogulka, and the Synya rivers from the left. These main channels are reunited below Shuryshkary into a single stream that is up to 12 miles (19 km) wide and 130 feet (40 metres) deep; but after the confluence of the Poluy (from the right) the river branches out…

  • synzoochory (seed dispersal)

    fruit: Animal dispersal: Synzoochory, deliberate carrying of diaspores by animals, is practiced when birds carry diaspores in their beaks. The European mistle thrush (Turdus viscivorus) deposits the viscid seeds of mistletoe (Viscum album) on potential host plants when, after a meal of the berries, it whets its bill…

  • Syon Abbey (building, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom)

    Robert Adam: The Adam style: …to redesign the interior of Syon House. Adam produced an important plan that proposed filling an old centre court with a vast, domed, pantheon-like hall; it was not executed, however. The entrance hall of Syon, based on a basilica—a rectangular building divided into three areas by two rows of columns—with…

  • Syon House (building, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom)

    Robert Adam: The Adam style: …to redesign the interior of Syon House. Adam produced an important plan that proposed filling an old centre court with a vast, domed, pantheon-like hall; it was not executed, however. The entrance hall of Syon, based on a basilica—a rectangular building divided into three areas by two rows of columns—with…

  • Syphax (king of the Masaesyli)

    Syphax, king of the Masaesyli, a Numidian tribe (in North Africa). Formerly a Carthaginian dependent, he rebelled in 214 bc in consultation with Publius Cornelius Scipio and his brother Gnaeus, who were fighting Carthaginian forces in Spain at the time. In 206 Syphax expelled his neighbour and

  • syphilis (disease)

    Syphilis, systemic disease that is caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum. Syphilis is usually a sexually transmitted disease, but it is occasionally acquired by direct nonsexual contact with an infected person, and it can also be acquired by an unborn fetus through infection in the

  • Syphilis sive morbus Gallicus (work by Fracastoro)

    Girolamo Fracastoro: He is best-known for “Syphilis sive morbus Gallicus” (1530; “Syphilis or the French Disease”), a work in rhyme giving an account of the disease, which he named. He made an intense study of epidemic diseases, and, while in the service of Pope Paul III at the Council of Trent…

  • syphilis test (medicine)

    Syphilis test, any of several laboratory procedures for the detection of syphilis. The most commonly used tests are carried out on a sample of blood serum (serological tests for syphilis, or STS). Serological tests are divided into two types: nontreponemal and treponemal. Nontreponemal tests

  • syphilitic laryngitis (pathology)

    laryngitis: Syphilitic laryngitis is one of the many complications of syphilis. In the second stage of syphilis, sores or mucous patches can form; as the disease advances to the third stage, there is tissue destruction followed by healing and scar formation. The scars can distort the…

  • syphilitic meningoencephalitis (pathology)

    Paresis, psychosis caused by widespread destruction of brain tissue occurring in some cases of late syphilis. Mental changes include gradual deterioration of personality, impaired concentration and judgment, delusions, loss of memory, disorientation, and apathy or violent rages. Convulsions are n

  • Syphilus (Greek mythology)

    syphilis: Syphilis through history: …to a mythic Greek shepherd, Syphilus, who was cursed by the god Apollo with a dread disease. The theory of a New World origin has been supported by evidence of treponematosis found in the skeletal remains of pre-Columbian American Indians. On the other hand, “leprosy” in Europe before 1500 was…

  • syphon (instrument)

    Siphon, instrument, usually in the form of a tube bent to form two legs of unequal length, for conveying liquid over the edge of a vessel and delivering it at a lower level. Siphons may be of any size. The action depends upon the influence of gravity (not, as sometimes thought, on the difference in

  • Syr (Norse mythology)

    Freyja, (Old Norse: “Lady”), most renowned of the Norse goddesses, who was the sister and female counterpart of Freyr and was in charge of love, fertility, battle, and death. Her father was Nj?rd, the sea god. Pigs were sacred to her, and she rode a boar with golden bristles. A chariot drawn by

  • Syr Darya (river, Central Asia)

    Syr Darya, river in the Central Asian republics of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kazakhstan. The Syr Darya is formed by the confluence of the Naryn and Qoradaryo rivers in the eastern Fergana Valley and generally flows northwest until it empties into the Aral Sea. With a length of 1,374 miles (2,212

  • Syr Tardush (people)

    China: The era of good government: …the Tang armies defeated the Xueyantou (Syr Tardush), former vassals of the eastern Turks, who became Tang vassals in 646. The Tuyuhun in the region around Koko Nor caused considerable trouble in the early 630s. Taizong invaded their territory in 634 and defeated them, but they remained unsubdued and invaded…

  • Syracuse (Italy)

    Syracuse, city, on the east coast of Sicily, 33 miles (53 km) south of Catania. It was the chief Greek city of ancient Sicily. Syracuse was settled about 734 bc by Corinthians led by the aristocrat Archias, and the city soon dominated the coastal plain and hill country beyond. The original Greek

  • Syracuse (New York, United States)

    Syracuse, city, seat (1827) of Onondaga county, central New York, U.S. It lies at the south end of Lake Onondaga, midway between Albany and Buffalo (147 miles [237 km] west). The site, once the territory of the Onondaga Indians and headquarters of the Iroquois Confederacy, was visited by explorers

  • Syracuse University (university, Syracuse, New York, United States)

    Syracuse University, private, coeducational institution of higher education, located in Syracuse, New York, U.S. It offers more than 400 undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs through 13 colleges and schools. Research facilities include the Aging Studies Institute, the Center for

  • Syracuse, Battle of (Peloponnesian War)

    Battle of Syracuse, (September 413 bce). The peace of Nicias of 421 bce did not end the Peloponnesian War. Within a few years, new Athenian leaders were looking for conquests among Sparta’s allies on Sicily, an important source of grain supplies for the Spartan confederation. Athens sent a massive

  • Syracuse, Siege of (Punic Wars [214–212 bce])

    Siege of Syracuse, (214–212 bce). Fought as part of the Second Punic War between Rome and Carthage, the capture of Syracuse by Rome marked the end of the independence of the Greek cities in southern Italy and Sicily. It also led to the death of the noted mathematician and inventor Archimedes, who

  • Syrdarya (river, Central Asia)

    Syr Darya, river in the Central Asian republics of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kazakhstan. The Syr Darya is formed by the confluence of the Naryn and Qoradaryo rivers in the eastern Fergana Valley and generally flows northwest until it empties into the Aral Sea. With a length of 1,374 miles (2,212

  • Syria

    Syria, country located on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea in southwestern Asia. Its area includes territory in the Golan Heights that has been occupied by Israel since 1967. The present area does not coincide with ancient Syria, which was the strip of fertile land lying between the eastern

  • Syria Palaestina

    Palestine, area of the eastern Mediterranean region, comprising parts of modern Israel and the Palestinian territories of the Gaza Strip (along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea) and the West Bank (the area west of the Jordan River). The term Palestine has been associated variously and sometimes

  • Syria Phoenice (Roman province, Asia)

    Lebanon: Greek and Roman periods: …north and east Syria, and Syria Phoenice in the southwestern region, which included not only coastal Phoenicia but also the territory beyond the mountains and into the Syrian Desert. Under the provincial reorganization of the Eastern Roman emperor Theodosius II in the early 5th century ce, Syria Phoenice was expanded…

  • Syria Uprising of 2011–2012 (Syrian history)

    In March 2011 Syria’s government, led by Pres. Bashar al-Assad, faced an unprecedented challenge to its authority when pro-democracy protests erupted throughout the country. Protesters demanded an end to the authoritarian practices of the Assad regime, in place since Assad’s father, ?afiz al-Assad,

  • Syria, flag of

    horizontally striped red-white-black national flag with two green stars on the white stripe. The flag’s width-to-length ratio is 2 to 3.In 1917 ?usayn ibn ?Alī, king of the Hejaz (now in Saudi Arabia), adopted the Arab Revolt Flag, intended to represent all Arab lands. It consisted of three

  • Syria, history of

    Syria: History: The earliest prehistoric remains of human habitation found in Syria and Palestine (stone implements, with bones of elephants and horses) are of the Middle Paleolithic Period. In the next stage are remains of rhinoceroses and of men who are classified as intermediate between

  • Syriac alphabet

    Syriac alphabet, writing system used by the Syriac Christians from the 1st century ad until about the 14th century. A Semitic alphabet, Syriac was an offshoot of a cursive Aramaic script. It had 22 letters, all representing consonants, and was generally written from right to left, although

  • Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch, The (pseudepigraphal work)

    Apocalypse of Baruch, a pseudepigraphal work (not in any canon of scripture), whose primary theme is whether or not God’s relationship with man is just. The book is also called The Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch because it was preserved only in the 6th-century Syriac Vulgate. It was originally

  • Syriac language

    Syriac language, Semitic language belonging to the Northern Central, or Northwestern, group that was an important Christian literary and liturgical language from the 3rd through the 7th century. Syriac was based on the East Aramaic dialect of Edessa, Osro?ne (present-day ?anl?urfa, in southeastern

  • Syriac literature

    Syriac literature, body of writings in Syriac, an eastern Aramaic Semitic language originally spoken in and around Edessa, Osro?ne (modern ?al?urfa, in southeastern Turkey). First attested in the 1st century ad, Syriac spread through the Middle East because of Edessa’s position as the intellectual

  • Syriac Orthodox Church (Christianity)

    Syriac Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East, autocephalous Oriental Orthodox Christian church. In the 5th and 6th centuries a large body of Christians in Syria repudiated the patriarchs of Antioch who had supported the Council of Chalcedon (451) both in its affirmation of the dual

  • Syriac Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East (Christianity)

    Syriac Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East, autocephalous Oriental Orthodox Christian church. In the 5th and 6th centuries a large body of Christians in Syria repudiated the patriarchs of Antioch who had supported the Council of Chalcedon (451) both in its affirmation of the dual

  • Syriam (Myanmar)

    Syriam, town and port, southwestern Myanmar (Burma). It is situated on the Yangon River, a tributary of the Irrawaddy River, opposite Yangon (Rangoon). Formerly part of the Mon kingdom, Syriam subsequently became a port of the Portuguese and French. In 1756 Alaungpaya (1714–60), the Myanmar king,

  • Syrian and Palestinian religion (ancient religion)

    Syrian and Palestinian religion, beliefs of Syria and Palestine between 3000 and 300 bce. These religions are usually defined by the languages of those who practiced them: e.g., Amorite, Hurrian, Ugaritic, Phoenician, Aramaic, and Moabite. The term Canaanite is often used broadly to cover a number

  • Syrian Arab Republic

    Syria, country located on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea in southwestern Asia. Its area includes territory in the Golan Heights that has been occupied by Israel since 1967. The present area does not coincide with ancient Syria, which was the strip of fertile land lying between the eastern

  • Syrian Catholic Church

    Syrian Catholic Church, an Eastern Catholic church of the Antiochene rite, in communion with Rome since the 17th century. In the 5th century, the Christians of Syria largely repudiated the rulings of the Council of Chalcedon (451), which had interpreted the Christological position of the Syrians as

  • Syrian chant (vocal music)

    Syrian chant, generic term for the vocal music of the various Syrian Christian churches, including Eastern Orthodox churches such as the Jacobites and Nestorians, and the Eastern churches in union with Rome—e.g., the Maronites (mostly in Lebanon) and the Chaldeans, who are dissidents from the

  • Syrian Civil War (Syrian history)

    In March 2011 Syria’s government, led by Pres. Bashar al-Assad, faced an unprecedented challenge to its authority when pro-democracy protests erupted throughout the country. Protesters demanded an end to the authoritarian practices of the Assad regime, in place since Assad’s father, ?afiz al-Assad,

  • Syrian Communist Party (political organization, Syria)

    Khalid Bakdash: …who acquired control of the Syrian Communist Party in 1932 and remained its most prominent spokesman until 1958, when he went into exile.

  • Syrian Desert (desert, Middle East)

    Syrian Desert, arid wasteland of southwestern Asia, extending northward from the Arabian Peninsula over much of northern Saudi Arabia, eastern Jordan, southern Syria, and western Iraq. Receiving on the average less than 5 inches (125 mm) of rainfall annually and largely covered by lava flows, it

  • Syrian hamster (rodent)

    Golden hamster, (Mesocricetus auratus), a species of hamster commonly kept as a pet. Like other hamsters, it has a stout body with short, stocky legs and short, wide feet with small, sharp claws. The head has small, furry ears and huge internal cheek pouches that open inside the lips and extend to

  • Syrian National Council (government organization, Syria)

    Syria: Uprising and civil war: …announced the formation of the Syrian National Council (SNC), an umbrella group claiming to represent the Syrian opposition.

  • Syrian ostrich (extinct bird)

    ostrich: The Syrian ostrich (S. camelus syriacus) of Syria and Arabia became extinct in 1941. The ostrich is the only living species in the genus Struthio. Ostriches are the only members of the family Struthionidae in the order Struthioniformes—a group that also contains kiwis, emus, cassowaries, and…

  • Syrian Protestant College (university, Beirut, Lebanon)

    American University of Beirut, private, nondenominational, coeducational international and intercultural university in Beirut, Lebanon, chartered in 1863 by the state of New York, U.S., as the Syrian Protestant College. Classes started in 1866. Although founded by the American Protestant Mission to

  • Syrian Refugee Crisis in 2014, The

    According to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), by late August 2014 the number of refugees who had fled the Syrian Civil War, in the aftermath of the Syrian uprising of 2011, had surpassed three million. The human toll of this conflict quickly had an impact on

  • Syrian rite (Christianity)

    Antiochene rite, the system of liturgical practices and discipline observed by Syrian Monophysites (Jacobites), the Malabar Christians of Kerala, India (Jacobites), and three Eastern-rite communities of the Roman Catholic church: Catholic Syrians, Maronites, and Malankarese Christians of Kerala.

  • Syrian rite (Christianity)

    Chaldean rite, system of liturgical practices and discipline historically associated with the Assyrian Church of the East (the so-called Nestorian Church) and also used by the Roman Catholic patriarchate of Babylon of the Chaldeans (see also Eastern rite church), where it is called the East Syrian

  • Syrian Social Nationalist Party (political party, Syria)

    An?ūn Sa?ādah: 16, 1932, Sa?ādah founded the Syrian Social Nationalist Party, a secret society that grew from a few students to about 1,000 members by 1935. During the 1930s the party expanded into Syria, Transjordan, and Palestine. Sa?ādah had created perhaps the first indigenous Arab youth organization. It stressed discipline, struggle, and…

  • Syrian Wars (Hellenistic history)

    Syrian Wars, (3rd century bc), five conflicts fought between the leading Hellenistic states, chiefly the Seleucid kingdom and Ptolemaic Egypt, and, in a lesser way, Macedonia. The complex and devious diplomacy that surrounded the wars was characteristic of the Hellenistic monarchies. The main issue

  • Syriana (film by Gaghan [2005])

    George Clooney: …a cynical CIA agent in Syriana (2005). The complex thriller took a critical look at the oil industry and its impact on international affairs. Clooney was also nominated for best director and best screenwriter for Good Night, and Good Luck (2005). The film—shot in black-and-white and featuring actual newsreel footage—documented…

  • Syringa (plant genus)

    Lilac, any of about 25 species of fragrant and beautiful northern spring-flowering garden shrubs and small trees constituting the genus Syringa of the family Oleaceae. Lilacs are native to eastern Europe and temperate Asia. Their deep green leaves enhance the attractiveness of the large, oval

  • Syringa chinensis (plant)

    lilac: The Chinese lilac, or Rouen lilac (S. chinensis), is a thickly branched hybrid, a cross of the Persian and common lilacs.

  • Syringa persica (plant, Syringa species)

    lilac: The weaker-stemmed Persian lilac (S. persica), ranging from Iran to China, droops over, reaching about 2 metres in height. Its flowers usually are pale lavender, but there are darker and even white varieties.

  • Syringa vulgaris (plant)

    lilac: The common lilac (S. vulgaris), from southeastern Europe, is widely grown in temperate areas of the world. There are several hundred named varieties with single or double flowers in deep purple, lavender, blue, red, pink, white, and pale, creamy yellow. The common lilac reaches approximately 6…

  • syringe (device)

    Blaise Pascal: Pascal’s life to the Port-Royal years: While experimenting, Pascal invented the syringe and created the hydraulic press, an instrument based upon the principle that became known as Pascal’s principle: pressure applied to a confined liquid is transmitted undiminished through the liquid in all directions regardless of the area to which the pressure is applied. His publications…

  • syringobulbia (pathology)

    syringomyelia: Syringobulbia, the formation of a cyst on the brainstem, may develop in association with syringomyelia. Symptoms include atrophy of the tongue, difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia), loss of pain and temperature sensation in the face, and a variety of other neurological disorders.

  • syringomyelia (pathology)

    Syringomyelia, chronic, progressive disease characterized principally by the development of a cyst, called a syrinx, near the spinal cord or brain stem. Symptoms include gradual dissociated sensory loss, muscle wasting, and spasticity. The cause of the disease is unknown but is thought to be a

  • syringomyelocele (pathology)

    neural tube defect: …to the name; hence, a syringomyelocele is an open defect containing nerve tissue and opening into the spinal cord.

  • syrinx (pathology)

    syringomyelia: …of a cyst, called a syrinx, near the spinal cord or brain stem. Symptoms include gradual dissociated sensory loss, muscle wasting, and spasticity. The cause of the disease is unknown but is thought to be a developmental defect. Symptoms ordinarily appear between 10 and 30 years of age; males are…

  • syrinx (bird anatomy)

    Syrinx, the vocal organ of birds, located at the base of the windpipe (trachea), where the trachea divides into the bronchi (tubes that connect the trachea with the lungs). The syrinx is lacking in the New World vultures (Cathartidae), which can only hiss and grunt, but reaches great complexity in

  • syrinx (musical instrument)

    Panpipe, wind instrument consisting of cane pipes of different lengths tied in a row or in a bundle held together by wax or cord (metal, clay, wood, and plastic instruments are also made) and generally closed at the bottom. They are blown across the top, each providing a different note. The panpipe

  • Syrinx aruanus (mollusk)

    Baler, largest living snail, a species of conch

  • Syriza (political party, Greece)

    Greece: Political process: …Sosialistiko Kinima; PASOK), Syriza (Coalition of the Radical Left), and the Communist Party of Greece (Kommunistiko Komma Elladas; KKE). New Democracy, founded by the veteran conservative politician Konstantinos Karamanlis, consistently supported “neoliberal” policies that aimed at limiting the power of the state and encouraging private initiatives and market economics.…

  • syrma (theatrical costume)

    stagecraft: Classical theatrical costume: …padding, tall wigs, and sleeved syrma (the robe corresponding to the chiton). Bands of bright hues decorated the costumes of happy characters, and gray, green, or blue those of fugitives. Gods and goddesses were distinguished by their insignia; seers were clad in woolen garments over a shorter, less-full syrma; and…

  • Syrmia (language)

    Albanian language: Dialects: …a text exists, and of Syrmia (Srem), for which there is none, have become extinct.

  • Syro-Ephraimitic war (ancient Southwest Asian history)

    biblical literature: The prophecies of First Isaiah: During the Syro-Ephraimitic war (734–732 bce), Isaiah began to challenge the policies of King Ahaz of Judah. Syria and Israel had joined forces against Judah. Isaiah’s advice to the young King of Judah was to place his trust in Yahweh. Apparently Isaiah believed that Assyria would take…

  • Syro-Malabar Church (church, India)

    Malabarese Catholic Church, a Chaldean rite church of southern India (Kerala) that united with Rome after the Portuguese colonization of Goa at the end of the 15th century. The Portuguese viewed these Christians of St. Thomas, as they called themselves, as Nestorian heretics, despite their

  • Syro-Malankara Church (church, India)

    Malankarese Catholic Church, an Antiochene-rite member of the Eastern Catholic church, composed of former members of the Syrian Orthodox (Jacobite) Church of Kerala, India, who united with Rome in 1930. The Syrian Orthodox Church came into existence in 1653, when the Christians of St. Thomas—as

  • Syro-Palestinian architecture
  • Syro-Palestinian art (ancient art)

    Syro-Palestinian art and architecture, the art and architecture of ancient Syria and Palestine. The countries bordering the Mediterranean between the Sinai Peninsula and the Nur Da?lar? (Amanus Mountains), to which the names Palestine and Syria are often loosely applied, had in fact no geographic

  • Syros (island, Greece)

    Syros, island near the centre of the Cyclades (Modern Greek: Kykládes) group, in the Aegean Sea, South Aegean (Nótio Aigaío) periféreia (region), southeastern Greece. Its chief town and port, Hermoúpolis, on a bay of the east coast, is the capital of the nomós (department) of Cyclades. The island

  • Syrphax (tyrant of Ephesus)

    Ephesus: History: …followed the pro-Persian tyranny of Syrphax and his family, who were stoned to death in 333 on Alexander the Great’s taking the city. After 50 years of fluctuating fortune, Ephesus was conquered by the Macedonian general Lysimachus and resettled around Coressus and Pion (286–281 bce). Lysimachus introduced colonists from Lebedus…

  • syrphid fly (insect)

    Hover fly, (family Syrphidae), any member of a family that contains about 6,000 species of insects in the fly order, Diptera. Their various common names refer to the behaviour of hovering around flowers. Hover flies, with their yellow markings, resemble wasps or bees but do not bite or sting. They

  • Syrphidae (insect)

    Hover fly, (family Syrphidae), any member of a family that contains about 6,000 species of insects in the fly order, Diptera. Their various common names refer to the behaviour of hovering around flowers. Hover flies, with their yellow markings, resemble wasps or bees but do not bite or sting. They

  • Syrphus americanus (insect)

    hover fly: , Syrphus americanus, Allograpta obligae) are predatory on aphids, with a single larva consuming the body fluids of hundreds of aphids before entering the resting (pupa) stage. Larvae are also important in pollination. Some, such as the narcissus bulb fly (Merodon or Lampetia equestris) and the…

  • Syrtis Major (surface feature, Mars)

    Syrtis Major, distinctive dark marking on the surface of the planet Mars, centred near 290° W and 10° N, which extends some 1,500 km (930 miles) north from the planet’s equator and spans 1,000 km (620 miles) from west to east. It was noticed as early as 1659, for it appears in a drawing of Mars of

  • Syrtis Major (gulf, Libya)

    Gulf of Sidra, arm of the Mediterranean Sea, indenting the Libyan coast of northern Africa. It extends eastward for 275 mi (443 km) from Mi?rātah to Banghāzī. A highway links scattered oases along its shore, which is chiefly desert, with salt marshes. In August the gulf’s water temperature reaches

  • Syrtis Minor (gulf, Tunisia)

    Gulf of Gabes, inlet, on the east coast of Tunisia, northern Africa. It is 60 miles (100 km) long and 60 miles wide and is bounded by the Qarqannah (Kerkena) Islands on the northeast and by Jarbah (Djerba) Island on the southeast. Except for the Strait of Gibraltar and the Gulf of Venice, it is the

  • syrtos (dance)

    Syrtos, ancient chain dance of Greece. It was described by Lucian (c. ad 125–190) and is still danced today in many varieties in the Greek islands. Traditionally, it was danced by segregated lines of men and women, a youth leading the line of girls; lines now are frequently mixed. The dancers in

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载