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  • Sand aus den Urnen, Der (work by Celan)

    Paul Celan: …his first collection of poems, Der Sand aus den Urnen (1948; “The Sand from the Urns”). From the outset his poetry was marked by a phantasmagoric perception of the terrors and injuries of reality and by a sureness of imagery and prosody.

  • sand badger (mammal)

    badger: The hog badger (Arctonyx collaris), also called the hog-nosed, or sand, badger, is a pale-clawed species of both lowland and mountainous regions in a range similar to that of ferret badgers. It is gray to black, with a black-and-white-striped head pattern and white throat, ears, and…

  • sand bar (geology)

    beach: …or several parallel, submarine, long-shore bars with intervening troughs may exist along sandy shores; if present, these bars constitute the last profile element.

  • sand beach (landform)

    coastal landforms: Landforms of depositional coasts: …that is characterized by well-developed sand beaches typically formed on long barrier islands with a few widely spaced tidal inlets. The barrier islands tend to be narrow and rather low in elevation. Longshore transport is extensive, and the inlets are often small and unstable. Jetties are commonly placed along the…

  • sand blow (geology)

    soil liquefaction: Liquefaction may also contribute to sand blows, which are also known as sand boils or sand volcanoes. Sand blows often accompany the liquefaction of sandy or silty soil. With the collapse of the soil’s granular structure, the density of the soil increases. This increased pressure squeezes the water out of…

  • sand bluestem (plant)

    bluestem: Sand bluestem (A. gerardii, subspecies hallii), with yellowish spikelets, grows on sand hills in the central and western United States. Broom sedge, or yellow bluestem (A. virginicus), and bushy beardgrass, or bush bluestem (A. glomeratus), are coarse grasses, unsuitable for forage, that grow in poor…

  • sand boa (snake)

    boa: …Indian, and African species of sand boa (genus Eryx) and the West African earth python (Charina reinhardtii), in addition to two North American species. Erycines are live-bearers (as opposed to egg layers) that have stout cylindrical bodies, blunt heads, and short tails. Most measure less than 70 cm (28 inches).…

  • sand boil (geology)

    soil liquefaction: Liquefaction may also contribute to sand blows, which are also known as sand boils or sand volcanoes. Sand blows often accompany the liquefaction of sandy or silty soil. With the collapse of the soil’s granular structure, the density of the soil increases. This increased pressure squeezes the water out of…

  • sand bug (crustacean)

    Mole crab, (Emerita, or Hippa, talpoida), crab of the Atlantic beaches from New England to Mexico. It is so named from its digging mole-fashion in sand. The shell is about 3.75 centimetres (1.5 inches) long, somewhat egg-shaped and yellowish white with purplish markings. It lives on beaches in the

  • sand casting (metallurgy)

    metallurgy: Sand-casting: Sand-casting is widely used for making cast-iron and steel parts of medium to large size in which surface smoothness and dimensional precision are not of primary importance.

  • Sand Castle (film by Coimbra [2016])

    Nicholas Hoult: …job as their driver, and Sand Castle (both 2016), about the Iraq War. In Rebel in the Rye (2017), he starred as J.D. Salinger, author of The Catcher in the Rye. Continuing to show his versatility, Hoult played an 18th-century politician in The Favourite (2018), a historical drama about Queen…

  • Sand Child, The (work by Ben Jelloun)

    Tahar Ben Jelloun: …until L’Enfant de sable (1985; The Sand Child), an imaginative, richly drawn novel that critiques gender roles in Arab society through the tale of a girl raised as a boy, that Ben Jelloun was accorded widespread praise and recognition. Its sequel, La Nuit sacrée (1987; The Sacred Night), won France’s…

  • Sand County Almanac, A (work by Leopold)

    Aldo Leopold: …Wisconsin), American environmentalist whose book A Sand County Almanac (1949) was read by millions and strongly influenced the budding environmental movement.

  • sand crab (crustacean)

    Ghost crab, (genus Ocypode), any of approximately 20 species of shore crabs (order Decapoda of the class Crustacea). O. quadratus, the beach crabs noted for their running speed, occur on dry sand above the high-tide mark on the western Atlantic coast from New Jersey to Brazil. The crab, sandy or

  • Sand Creek Declaration

    Disciples of Christ: Controversy and separation: …churches in Illinois issued the Sand Creek Declaration, withdrawing fellowship from those practicing “innovations and corruptions.” In 1904 a separate “preacher list” issued unofficially by some conservative leaders certified their preachers for discounts on railway tickets. The Federal Religious Census of 1906 acknowledged the separation between Churches of Christ and…

  • Sand Creek Massacre (United States history [1864])

    Sand Creek Massacre, (November 29, 1864), controversial surprise attack upon a camp of Cheyenneand Arapaho people in southeastern Colorado Territory by a force of about 675 U.S. troops, mostly Colorado volunteers, under Col. John M. Chivington. The camp contained approximately 750 Cheyenne and

  • Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site (historic site, Colorado, United States)

    Sand Creek Massacre: Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site was opened in 2007 to preserve the location of the incident.

  • sand cricket (insect)

    Jerusalem cricket, (subfamily Stenopelmatinae), any of about 50 species of insects in the family Stenopelmatidae (order Orthoptera) that are related to grasshoppers and crickets. Jerusalem crickets are large, brownish, awkward insects that are found in Asia, South Africa, and both North and Central

  • sand devil (meteorology)

    Dust devil, small, brief whirlwind occurring most frequently in the early afternoon when a land surface is heating rapidly. Dust devils are occasionally made visible by the lofting of dust, leaves, or other loose matter from the surface. See also

  • sand diver (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Trichonotidae (sand divers) Resemble Percophiidae but body extremely elongated and dorsal fin unusually high; snout pointed; lips fringed; dive headfirst into sand. 8 species; tropical and subtropical Indo-Pacific oceans. Family Creediidae Elongate little fishes resembling Percophiidae; 16 species; coasts of Australia, Marshall and Mariana islands.

  • sand dollar (echinoderm)

    Sand dollar, any of the invertebrate marine animals of the order Clypeastroida (class Echinoidea, phylum Echinodermata) that has a flat, disk-shaped body. They are close relatives of sea urchins and heart urchins. The sand dollar is particularly well adapted for burrowing in sandy substrates. Very

  • sand dune

    Sand dune, any accumulation of sand grains shaped into a mound or ridge by the wind under the influence of gravity. Sand dunes are comparable to other forms that appear when a fluid moves over a loose bed, such as subaqueous “dunes” on the beds of rivers and tidal estuaries and sand waves on the

  • sand eel (fish)

    Sand lance, any of about 18 species of marine fishes of the family Ammodytidae (order Perciformes). Sand lances are slim, elongated, usually silver fishes especially abundant in northern seas. Although eel-like in shape and movement, they are not true eels. The species range from about 20 to 46

  • sand flea (crustacean)

    Sand flea, any of more than 60 terrestrial crustaceans of the family Talitridae (order Amphipoda) that are notable for their hopping ability. The European sand flea (Talitrus saltator), which is about 1.5 cm (0.6 inch) long, lives on sand beaches near the high-tide mark, remaining buried in the

  • sand flounder (fish family)

    pleuronectiform: Annotated classification: Family Paralichthyidae (sand flounders) Eyes usually sinistral; pelvic fin bases short, pectoral rays branched. About 16 genera and 105 species. Marine, present in all oceans, rarely in fresh water. Family Samaridae (crested flounders) Origin of dorsal in front of eyes; lateral line well developed or rudimentary; pelvic…

  • sand fly (insect)

    Sand fly, any insect of the family Phlebotomidae (sometimes considered part of the family Psychodidae) of the order Diptera. The aquatic larvae live in the intertidal zone of coastal beaches, in mud, or in wet organic debris. Sand flies are of considerable medical importance: around the

  • sand fly fever (pathology)

    Pappataci fever, acute, infectious, febrile disease caused by a phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) and producing temporary incapacitation. It is transmitted to humans by the bloodsucking female sand fly (notably Phlebotomus papatasii, P. perniciosus, and P. perfiliewsi) and is prevalent in the moist

  • sand food (plant)

    Lennooideae: … occur in southwestern North America: sand food (P. sonorae) and desert Christmas tree (P. arenarium). The succulent underground stems of sand food were used as food by Native Americans in what is now Arizona.

  • sand food subfamily (plant subfamily)

    Lennooideae, the sand food subfamily of the family Boraginaceae, composed of two genera and four species of parasitic plants. The unusual plants inhabit desert regions in Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico, and the southwestern United States, and many are considered rare. Though formerly treated as its

  • sand fox (mammal)

    fox: Classification: rueppelli (sand fox) Big-eared fox of the deserts of northern Africa southward to the Sudan; also found in Saudi Arabia and southwestern Asia; weight usually 2 or 3 kg, length to 80 cm, including tail; coat sandy or silvery gray with black patches on the face.…

  • sand fulgurite (mineral)

    fulgurite: Sand fulgurites, the more common, are branching, more or less cylindrical tubes that are about one centimetre (one-half inch) to several centimetres in diameter; they are commonly less than 3 metres (10 feet) long but sometimes reach 20 m (66 ft). The central cavity is…

  • sand gazelle (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: gazella), the goitred, or sand, gazelle (G. subgutturosa), the Arabian gazelle (G. arabica; now extinct), the Saudi gazelle (G. saudiya; now extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North…

  • sand grouse (bird)

    Sandgrouse, (order Pteroclidiformes), any of 16 species of birds of Asian and African deserts. According to some systems of classification, sandgrouse are ranked with the plovers within the order Charadriiformes. Sandgrouses are about 22 to 40 cm (about 9 to 16 inches) long and have gray or brown

  • Sand Hills (region, Nebraska, United States)

    Sand Hills, region of grass-covered, stabilized sand dunes in the High Plains of north-central Nebraska, U.S. Extending 265 miles (425 km) across Nebraska and a portion of southern South Dakota, it covers some 19,300 square miles (50,000 square km). It lies mostly to the north of the Platte and

  • sand hopper (crustacean)

    Sand flea, any of more than 60 terrestrial crustaceans of the family Talitridae (order Amphipoda) that are notable for their hopping ability. The European sand flea (Talitrus saltator), which is about 1.5 cm (0.6 inch) long, lives on sand beaches near the high-tide mark, remaining buried in the

  • Sand Island (United States territory, Pacific Ocean)

    Johnston Atoll, unincorporated territory of the United States in the central Pacific Ocean, about 825 miles (1,330 km) southwest of Honolulu. It consists of four small islands on a raised coral atoll formation that are partially enclosed on the north and west by a 7.5-mile (12-km) semicircular

  • Sand Island (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Midway Islands: …two main islands—Eastern (Green) and Sand islands. Its total land area is 2.4 square miles (6.2 square km). The climate is subtropical, with cool and wet winters and warm and dry summers.

  • sand lance (fish)

    Sand lance, any of about 18 species of marine fishes of the family Ammodytidae (order Perciformes). Sand lances are slim, elongated, usually silver fishes especially abundant in northern seas. Although eel-like in shape and movement, they are not true eels. The species range from about 20 to 46

  • sand love grass (plant)

    love grass: sand love grass (E. trichodes), and weeping love grass (E. curvula) are forage species in southern North America. Weeping love grass, native to South Africa, was introduced elsewhere as an ornamental and later was used to reclaim abandoned or eroded areas formerly under cultivation. Stink…

  • sand martin (bird)

    martin: The sand martin, or bank swallow (Riparia riparia), a 12-centimetre (5-inch) brown and white bird, breeds throughout the Northern Hemisphere; it makes nest burrows in sandbanks. The house martin (Delichon urbica), blue-black above and white-rumped, is common in Europe. The African river martin (Pseudochelidon eurystomina) of…

  • sand mountain

    Sand mountain, isolated mountain of sand formed in an open desert area by the action of strong winds blowing from various directions. These huge accumulations of sand may reach up to 300 metres (1,000 feet) in height in Saudi Arabia and in the Namib Desert. They generally remain stable for

  • sand painting

    Sand painting, type of art that exists in highly developed forms among the Navajo and Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest and in simpler forms among several Plains and California Indian tribes. Although sand painting is an art form, it is valued among the Indians primarily for religious rather

  • Sand Pebbles, The (film by Wise [1966])

    The Sand Pebbles, American war film, released in 1966, that proved controversial for its parallels to the ongoing Vietnam War (1954–75). Steve McQueen earned his only Academy Award nomination for his portrayal of an alienated and disillusioned sailor. The Sand Pebbles opens in 1926 as China is

  • Sand Point (Florida, United States)

    Titusville, city, seat (1879) of Brevard county, east-central Florida, U.S., about 35 miles (55 km) east of Orlando. The city, on the Intracoastal Waterway, is situated on the west bank of the Indian River (a lagoon separated from the Atlantic Ocean by barrier islands) and is linked (via a causeway

  • sand quillwort (plant)

    quillwort: Major species: Sand quillwort (I. histrix), an inconspicuous terrestrial European species, has very narrow 5–7-cm (2–3-inch-) long leaves that curl back to the ground from a fat white tufted base.

  • sand rat (rodent)

    Sand rat, either of two species of gerbils in the genus

  • sand reed (plant)

    Beach grass, (genus Ammophila), genus of two species of sand-binding plants in the grass family (Poaceae). American beach grass (Ammophila breviligulata) grows along the Atlantic coast and in the Great Lakes region of North America. European beach grass (A. arenaria) is native to temperate coasts

  • Sand River (river, Zimbabwe)

    Precambrian: Structure and occurrence of granulite-gneiss belts: …strip between greenstone-granite belts, the Sand River gneisses that occupy a small area between greenstone-granite belts in Zimbabwe, and the Napier Complex in Enderby Land in Antarctica. Granulite-gneiss belts are commonly surrounded by younger, mostly Proterozoic belts that contain remobilized relicts of the Archean rocks, and the granulites and gneisses…

  • Sand River and Bloemfontein conventions (South African history)

    Sand River and Bloemfontein conventions, conventions of 1852 and 1854, respectively, between Great Britain and the Voortrekkers (Boers), who after 1835 had invaded the interior of Southern Africa north of the Orange River as part of the Great Trek. The conventions guaranteed their right to govern

  • sand sea (desert feature)

    Erg, in a desert region, area of large accumulation of sand, generally in the bottom of a huge basin in which a former river piled up alluvium. Ergs are areas of actively shifting dunes, “fossilized” dunes, or extensive sand sheets. The sand is generally loose and is extremely difficult to cross.

  • sand shark (fish)

    Sand shark, any of about three species of sharks of the genera Carcharias and Odontaspis in the family Odontaspididae. Sand sharks are found in shallow water, usually at or near the bottom, along tropical and temperate coastlines of all oceans. They range from about 3 to 6 metres (10 to 20 feet) in

  • sand sheet (geology)

    sedimentary rock: Formation of sandstones today: …comes from detailed study of sand bodies forming at the present time. One of the clues to origin is the overall shape of the entire sand deposit. Inland desert sands today cover vast areas as a uniform blanket; some ancient sandstones in beds a few hundred metres thick but 1,600…

  • sand shrimp (crustacean)

    shrimp: The common European shrimp, or sand shrimp, Crangon vulgaris (Crago septemspinosus), occurs in coastal waters on both sides of the North Atlantic and grows to about 8 cm (3 inches); it is gray or dark brown with brown or reddish spots. The shrimp Peneus setiferus feeds on small plants and…

  • sand skink (lizard)

    skink: Sand skinks (Scincus), also called sandfish, run across and “swim” through windblown sand aided by fringes of scales on their toes. Their countersunk lower jaw, scales that partially cover the ear openings, specialized nasal openings, and fringes on the eyelids allow them to move through…

  • sand smelt (fish)

    Silversides, any of several species of small slim schooling fish of the family Atherinidae (order Atheriniformes), found in freshwater and along coasts around the world in warm and temperate regions. Silversides are named for the wide silvery stripe usually present on each side. They have two

  • Sand Springs (Oklahoma, United States)

    Sand Springs, city, Tulsa county, northeastern Oklahoma, U.S., near a spring in the Osage Hills. First settled in 1933 by Creek Indians, who called it Adams Springs after U.S. President John Quincy Adams, the area was renamed Sand Springs by oilman Charles Page, who bought land on the site and

  • sand stargazer (fish)

    stargazer: …(electric stargazers) and Dactyloscopidae (sand stargazers), both of the order Perciformes. Stargazers habitually bury themselves in the bottom. They have tapered bodies and big, heavy, flat heads. Their mouths slant vertically, their lips are fringed, and their eyes are on top of the head (hence the common name).

  • sand table (metallurgy)

    mineral processing: Gravity separation: …spirals or impact forces on shaking tables. Spirals consist of a vertical spiral channel with an oval cross section. As the pulp flows from the top to the bottom of the channel, heavier particles concentrate on the inner side of the stream, where they can be removed through special openings.…

  • sand trap (golf)

    golf: Procedure: …putting green are obstacles called bunkers, depressions filled with sand (sand traps). Some holes require the player to cross streams or ponds. Both bunkers and bodies of water are termed hazards.

  • sand volcano (geology)

    soil liquefaction: Liquefaction may also contribute to sand blows, which are also known as sand boils or sand volcanoes. Sand blows often accompany the liquefaction of sandy or silty soil. With the collapse of the soil’s granular structure, the density of the soil increases. This increased pressure squeezes the water out of…

  • sand wasp (insect)

    Sand wasp, (tribe Bembicini), any of a group of wasps in the subfamily Bembicinae (family Crabronidae, order Hymenoptera) that are solitary, stout-bodied insects about 2 to 2.5 cm (about 0.8 to 1 inch) long. The horse-guard (Bembix carolina) of the southern United States often hunts for flies

  • sand wedge (golf club)

    Gene Sarazen: …golf club known as the sand wedge. This specialized club allows golfers to more easily hit out of sand traps (bunkers). The introduction of the sand wedge to the game lowered scores and eventually led to the redesign of many golf courses in order to keep them at their previous…

  • Sand, George (French novelist)

    George Sand, French Romantic writer known primarily for her so-called rustic novels. She was brought up at Nohant, near La Chatre in Berry, the country home of her grandmother. There she gained the profound love and understanding of the countryside that were to inform most of her works. In 1817 she

  • Sand, Karl (German radical and assassin)

    Carlsbad Decrees: …the dramatist August Kotzebue by Karl Sand, a member of a radical student organization—to persuade the German governments to combine for the suppression of liberal and nationalistic tendencies within their states. The conference agreed to Metternich’s urgent disciplinary measures. He proposed that (1) the Diet of the German Confederation (Bund)…

  • Sand, the (desert, Arabia)

    Rub? al-Khali, (Arabic: “Empty Quarter”) vast desert region in the southern Arabian Peninsula, constituting the largest portion of the Arabian Desert. It covers an area of about 250,000 square miles (650,000 square km) in a structural basin lying mainly in southeastern Saudi Arabia, with lesser

  • sand-lime brick

    brick and tile: Sand-lime brick: Sand-lime brick is a product that uses lime instead of cement. It is usually a white brick made of lime and selected sands, cast in molds and cured. Production is limited, with greater use in the United States and Germany.

  • Sand-Reckoner, The (work by Archimedes)

    Aristarchus of Samos: Archimedes said in his Sand-Reckoner that Aristarchus had proposed a new theory which, if true, would make the universe vastly larger than was then believed. (This is because a moving Earth should produce a parallax, or annual shift, in the apparent positions of the fixed stars, unless the stars…

  • sandae (Korean theatre)

    South Korea: The arts: …own local versions of the sandae masked play and dances. Today the sandae is performed by villagers in Ky?nggi and South Ky?ngsang provinces as well as in parts of North Korea. Performers are males. Masks cover either the whole head or the face and are made from paper or gourds…

  • sandae togamgug (Korean theatre)

    South Korea: The arts: …own local versions of the sandae masked play and dances. Today the sandae is performed by villagers in Ky?nggi and South Ky?ngsang provinces as well as in parts of North Korea. Performers are males. Masks cover either the whole head or the face and are made from paper or gourds…

  • Sandage, Allan (American astronomer)

    Allan Sandage, American astronomer who led an extensive effort to determine Hubble’s constant, the rate at which the universe is expanding. He also did important early work on quasi-stellar radio sources (quasars), very distant starlike objects that can be strong emitters of radio waves. Sandage

  • Sandage, Allan Rex (American astronomer)

    Allan Sandage, American astronomer who led an extensive effort to determine Hubble’s constant, the rate at which the universe is expanding. He also did important early work on quasi-stellar radio sources (quasars), very distant starlike objects that can be strong emitters of radio waves. Sandage

  • sandai-hihō (Buddhism)

    Nichiren Buddhism: …this concept, known as the sandai-hihō (“three great secret laws [or mysteries]”). The first, the honzon, is the chief object of worship in Nichiren temples and is a ritual drawing showing the name of the Lotus Sutra surrounded by the names of divinities mentioned in the sutra (discourse of the…

  • Sandakan (Malaysia)

    Sandakan, city and port, eastern Sabah, East Malaysia, northeastern Borneo. It is located on an inlet of the Sulu Sea, near the mouth of the Kinabatangan River, on the heavily indented east coast. The capital of British North Borneo (now Sabah) until 1947, it is the commercial heart of the state.

  • Sandakinduru Katava (Ceylonese dance-drama)

    South Asian arts: Masked drama: …plays are especially famous: the Sandakinduru Katava and the Gothayimbala Katava. The former deals with the legendary idyllic love between a half-human, half-bird couple singing and dancing in a forest. The King of Banaras comes hunting and, attracted by the beautiful Kinduri, kills her husband and makes advances to her.…

  • sandal (footwear)

    Sandal, type of footwear consisting of a sole secured to the foot by straps over the instep, toes, or ankle. The oldest known example of a sandal dates from about 10,900 years before the present, is made of sagebrush bark, and comes from what is now the U.S. state of Oregon. Sandals have also been

  • Sandalwood (island, Indonesia)

    Sumba, island, one of the Lesser Sunda Islands, southern Nusa Tenggara Timur provinsi (East Nusa Tenggara province), southern Indonesia, in the Indian Ocean across the Sumba Strait from Flores and west of Timor across the Savu Sea. Sumba has an area of 4,306 square miles (11,153 square km) and

  • sandalwood (plant)

    Sandalwood, any semiparasitic plant of the genus Santalum (family Santalaceae), especially the fragrant wood of the true, or white, sandalwood, Santalum album. The approximately 10 species of Santalum are distributed throughout southeastern Asia and the islands of the South Pacific. Many other

  • Sandalwood English (language)

    bêche-de-mer: The term Bêche-de-Mer has also come to designate the pidgin English language spoken in these regions.

  • sandalwood family (plant family)

    Santalaceae, the sandalwood family (order Santalales), which includes about 36 genera and more than 400 species of semiparasitic shrubs, herbs, and trees, distributed in tropical and temperate regions. In some genera the unlobed, usually alternate leaves are reduced to scalelike structures. The

  • Sandalwood Island (island, Fiji)

    Vanua Levu Island, second largest island of Fiji, bordering the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean, 40 miles (64 km) northeast of the island of Viti Levu. Sighted by the Dutch navigator Abel Janszoon Tasman in 1643, the volcanic Vanua Levu (“Great Land”) was formerly called Sandalwood Island. It

  • sandalwood order (plant order)

    Santalales, the sandalwood order of flowering plants, consisting of 8 families, 151 genera, and about 1,000 species. All the families in Santalales are parasitic to some degree, attaching either to the roots or branches of their hosts. They include Santalaceae, Loranthaceae, Balanophoraceae,

  • sandarac (resin)

    Sandarac, brittle, faintly aromatic, translucent resin, usually available in the form of small, pale yellow, dusty tears; it is used as incense and in making a spirit varnish for coating paper, leather, and metal. The initial film is brittle, but it can readily be modified to yield elastic films

  • sandarach (resin)

    Sandarac, brittle, faintly aromatic, translucent resin, usually available in the form of small, pale yellow, dusty tears; it is used as incense and in making a spirit varnish for coating paper, leather, and metal. The initial film is brittle, but it can readily be modified to yield elastic films

  • Sandawe (people)

    Sandawe, a people living near Kondoa, Tanzania, between the Bubu and Mponde rivers, and speaking one of the three branches of the Khoisan languages. Many aspects of their culture show the influence of their Bantu neighbours. Their isolated wooden houses with roofs of clay are built in the lee of

  • Sandawe language

    Khoisan languages: Classification of the Khoisan languages: Sandawe of Tanzania has a distant relationship to the Central group, but the place of Hadza even in relation to Sandawe has always been unclear; and the status of Kwadi, an extinct language of Namibe (formerly Mo?amedes) in southwestern Angola, remains uncertain. Kwadi may be…

  • Sanday, Edgar (prime minister of France)

    Edgar Faure, French lawyer and politician, premier (1952, 1955–56), and a prominent Gaullist during the Fifth Republic. The son of a military doctor, Faure studied Russian at the Paris School of Eastern Languages, later graduating from the Paris faculty of law and practicing in the capital.

  • Sanday, William (British biblical scholar)

    William Sanday, New Testament scholar, one of the pioneers in introducing to English students and the Anglican world the mass of work done by continental scholars in biblical criticism, particularly through his principal writings, Commentary on Romans (1895, with Arthur C. Headlam), and Outlines of

  • sandbank model (astronomy)

    comet: The modern era: … observed on Earth, the “sandbank” model suggested that a comet was simply a cloud of meteoritic particles held together by its own gravity. Interplanetary gases were adsorbed on the surfaces of the dust grains and escaped when the comet came close to the Sun and the particles were heated.…

  • sandbar (geology)

    Sandbar, submerged or partly exposed ridge of sand or coarse sediment that is built by waves offshore from a beach. The swirling turbulence of waves breaking off a beach excavates a trough in the sandy bottom. Some of this sand is carried forward onto the beach and the rest is deposited on the

  • Sandberg, Inger (Swedish author)

    children's literature: National and modern literature: The Sandbergs, Inger and Lasse, have advanced the Beskow tradition in a series of lovely picture books. Fantasy has been well served by Lindgren, Edith Unnerstad, Holmberg, Hellsing, and others. Children’s poetry is a lively contemporary art, one distinguished poet being Britt G. Hallqvist.

  • Sandberg, Lasse (Swedish author)

    children's literature: National and modern literature: The Sandbergs, Inger and Lasse, have advanced the Beskow tradition in a series of lovely picture books. Fantasy has been well served by Lindgren, Edith Unnerstad, Holmberg, Hellsing, and others. Children’s poetry is a lively contemporary art, one distinguished poet being Britt G. Hallqvist.

  • Sandberg, Ryne (American baseball player)

    Chicago Cubs: …Billy Williams (1959–74); second baseman Ryne Sandberg (1982–94, 1996–97); pitcher Ferguson (“Fergie”) Jenkins (1966–73, 1982–83); and third baseman Ron Santo (1960–73).

  • Sandberg, Sheryl (American business executive)

    Sheryl Sandberg, American technology executive who was chief operating officer (COO) of the social networking company Facebook (2008– ). Sandberg studied economics at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. There she did her undergraduate thesis with economist Lawrence Summers as her

  • Sandberg, Sheryl Kara (American business executive)

    Sheryl Sandberg, American technology executive who was chief operating officer (COO) of the social networking company Facebook (2008– ). Sandberg studied economics at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. There she did her undergraduate thesis with economist Lawrence Summers as her

  • Sandbian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Sandbian Stage, first of three internationally defined stages of the Upper Ordovician Series, encompassing all rocks deposited during the Sandbian Age (458.4 million to 453 million years ago) of the Ordovician Period. In 2002 the International Commission on Stratigraphy established the Global

  • Sandbox (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Antiship: The SS-N-12 Sandbox, introduced in the 1970s on the Kiev-class antisubmarine carriers, was apparently an improved Shaddock. The SS-N-19 Shipwreck, a small, vertically launched, flip-out wing supersonic missile with a range of about 390 miles, appeared in the 1980s.

  • sandbox tree (plant)

    Sandbox tree, either of two species of large trees (Hura crepitans and H. polyandra) in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae). They are among the largest trees of tropical America and are interesting for their pumpkin-shaped seed capsules that explode with a loud report, scattering the seeds. Sandbox

  • Sandbox, The (play by Albee)

    The Sandbox, one-act play by Edward Albee, published in 1959 (with The Death of Bessie Smith) and produced in 1960. It is a trenchant satire on false values and the lack of love and empathy in the American family. For his expanded one-act play The American Dream (1961), Albee used the characters he

  • sandbur (plant genus)

    Sandbur, (genus Cenchrus), genus of about 20 to 25 species of grasses in the family Poaceae. Sandburs are native to warm sandy areas of North America, North Africa, Asia, Europe, and the South Pacific. The plants can be used for forage when young, but they later form rounded sharp-spined burs that

  • Sandburg’s Lincoln (American television miniseries)

    Hal Holbrook: Abraham Lincoln in the miniseries Sandburg’s Lincoln(1974–76); the role earned him one of five career Emmy Awards. He also appeared on such television shows as The West Wing, The Sopranos, ER, Sons of Anarchy, and Grey’s Anatomy. His most notable film roles included Deep Throat in All the President’s Men…

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