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  • Sandburg, Carl (American poet and historian)

    Carl Sandburg, American poet, historian, novelist, and folklorist. From the age of 11, Sandburg worked in various occupations—as a barbershop porter, a milk truck driver, a brickyard hand, and a harvester in the Kansas wheat fields. When the Spanish-American War broke out in 1898, he enlisted in

  • sanddab (fish)

    Sanddab, any of certain edible, American Pacific flatfishes of the genus Citharichthys (family Paralichthyidae). As in other flatfishes, sanddabs have both eyes on the same side of the head; as in other paralichthyids, the eyes are usually on the left side. The most common species of sanddab is

  • Sande (African secret society)

    African religions: Ritual and religious specialists: The Sande secret society of the Mande-speaking peoples is an important example, because its religious vision and political power extend across Liberia, Sierra Leone, C?te d’Ivoire, and Guinea. The Sande initiate girls by teaching them domestic skills and sexual etiquette, as well as the religious significance…

  • Sande, Earl (American jockey)

    Earl Sande, U.S. jockey who won the Kentucky Derby three times. One of his Derby-winning mounts, Gallant Fox in 1930, also won the Preakness and the Belmont Stakes, thereby gaining the coveted U.S. Triple Crown. Besides Gallant Fox, Sande’s other Kentucky Derby winners were Zev in 1923 and Flying

  • Sandeau, Jules (French author)

    Léonard-Sylvain-Julien Sandeau, prolific French novelist, best remembered for his collaborations with more famous writers. As a young man, Sandeau became the lover of Amandine-Aurore-Lucie Dudevant (later known as George Sand) and worked with her on the novel Rose et Blanche (1831; “Red and

  • Sandeau, Léonard-Sylvain-Julien (French author)

    Léonard-Sylvain-Julien Sandeau, prolific French novelist, best remembered for his collaborations with more famous writers. As a young man, Sandeau became the lover of Amandine-Aurore-Lucie Dudevant (later known as George Sand) and worked with her on the novel Rose et Blanche (1831; “Red and

  • Sandefjord (Norway)

    Sandefjord, town, southeastern Norway. Located near the mouth of the Oslo Fjord at the head of Sandefjord Fjord, an inlet of the Skagerrak, Sandefjord was established in the 14th century, and it received its charter in 1845. In the early 1900s it became one of the world’s major whaling centres,

  • Sandel, Cora (Norwegian author)

    Norwegian literature: Poetry and the novel: …one of several writers—among them Cora Sandel and Aksel Sandemose—who opened new horizons for Norwegian prose before and after World War II, each in distinctive ways. Vesaas, who wrote in Nynorsk, has been called Norway’s most provincial international writer; his works—especially Det store spelet (1934; The Great Cycle)—are firmly rooted…

  • Sandel, Michael (American philosopher)

    communitarianism: Varieties of communitarianism: … and the American political theorist Michael Sandel were among the most prominent scholars of this brand of communitarianism. Other political theorists and philosophers who were often cited as communitarians in this sense, or whose work exhibited elements of such communitarian thinking, included Shlomo Avineri, Seyla Benhabib, Avner de-Shalit, Jean Bethke…

  • Sandelin Museum (museum, Saint-Omer, France)

    Saint-Omer: The Sandelin Museum, housing a collection of ceramics and Flemish paintings, is in an elegant 18th-century building. The town was heavily damaged during World Wars I and II.

  • Sandeman, Robert (Scottish minister)

    Robert Sandeman, British cleric and leader of the Glasite (later called Sandemanian) sect, dissenters from the established Presbyterian Church. From 1736 to 1744 Sandeman was a linen manufacturer. He married (1737) Catherine, daughter of John Glas, who founded the Glasites. Sandeman became an elder

  • Sandemanians (Protestant sect)

    Sandemanian, member of a Christian sect founded in about 1730 in Scotland by John Glas (1695–1773), a Presbyterian minister in the Church of Scotland. Glas concluded that there was no support in the New Testament for a national church because the kingdom of Christ is essentially spiritual. He a

  • Sandemose, Aksel (Norwegian novelist)

    Aksel Sandemose, Danish-born Norwegian experimental novelist whose works frequently elucidate the theme that the repressions of society lead to violence. Sandemose went to sea in his teens, jumped ship in Newfoundland, and worked in a lumber camp before returning to Denmark with memories of

  • sander (tool)

    Sander, portable power tool used for smoothing, polishing, or cleaning a surface, as of wood, plastic, or metal. Sanders are also used to roughen surfaces in preparation for finishing. There are three main types of power sanders: the disk sander, the belt sander, and the orbital sander. In the

  • Sander vitreus (fish)

    Walleyed pike, fish that is a type of pikeperch

  • Sander, August (German photographer)

    August Sander, German photographer who attempted to produce a comprehensive photographic document of the German people. The son of a mining carpenter, Sander apprenticed as a miner in 1889. Acquiring his first camera in 1892, he took up photography as a hobby and, after military service, pursued it

  • Sander, Heidemarie Jiline (German fashion designer)

    Jil Sander, German fashion designer and founder of the Jil Sander label, noted for her luxurious understated clothing and influence on minimalist fashion. After graduating in 1963 from a textile-engineering school in Krefeld, Germany, Sander worked for a time in fashion journalism, first at

  • Sander, Jil (German fashion designer)

    Jil Sander, German fashion designer and founder of the Jil Sander label, noted for her luxurious understated clothing and influence on minimalist fashion. After graduating in 1963 from a textile-engineering school in Krefeld, Germany, Sander worked for a time in fashion journalism, first at

  • Sander, Nicholas (English scholar)

    Nicholas Sanders, English Roman Catholic scholar, controversialist, and historian of the English Reformation. He was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, at which university he became a lecturer in canon law. He left England shortly after the accession of Elizabeth I in order to be free

  • sanderling (bird)

    Sanderling, (Calidris alba; sometimes Crocethia alba), abundant shorebird, a worldwide species of sandpiper belonging to the family Scolopacidae (order Charadriiformes). Sanderlings nest on barrens near the sea around the North Pole, and they winter on sandy beaches virtually everywhere. About 20

  • Sanderling, Kurt (German conductor)

    Kurt Sanderling, German conductor (born Sept. 19, 1912, Ays, East Prussia [now Orzysz, Pol.]—died Sept. 17, 2011, Berlin, Ger.), was admired for his intelligent restraint on the podium, especially his nuanced interpretations of works by Dmitry Shostakovich, who became a personal friend. Sanderling

  • Sanders of the River (film by Korda [1935])

    Zoltan Korda: He then helmed the drama Sanders of the River (1935), which starred Paul Robeson as an African chief and Nina Mae McKinney as his queen. Zoltan and his brother argued over the film’s portrayal of colonialism, and Alexander, as the producer, ultimately edited the movie so that it glorified the…

  • Sanders, Alexander (American Wiccan leader)

    Wicca: Later developments: …Gardnerians, including one led by Alexander Sanders (1926–1988), the Dianic Wiccans who saw Wicca as a woman’s religion, and the parallel Neo-Pagan movement, which also worshipped the Goddess and practiced witchcraft but eschewed the designation witch. A major controversy developed in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s, when…

  • Sanders, B. (Danish manufacturer)

    button: …as the stamped-steel type by B. Sanders, a Danish manufacturer in England. The two shells, thin metal disks enclosing a small piece of cloth or pasteboard, were crimped together on the edges. Sanders also originated the canvas shank. By 1830 fabric-covered buttons were being made mechanically. Also coming into use…

  • Sanders, Barry (American football player)

    Barry Sanders, American professional gridiron football player who was one of the game’s outstanding running backs. In his 10 seasons with the Detroit Lions (1989–98), Sanders led the National Football League (NFL) in rushing four times and was selected every year for the Pro Bowl. He was inducted

  • Sanders, Bernard (United States senator)

    Bernie Sanders, American politician who was first elected to represent Vermont in the U.S. Senate in 2006 and took office the following year. Previously he served (1981–89) as the mayor of Burlington, Vermont, and as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1991–2007). Formally unaffiliated

  • Sanders, Bernie (United States senator)

    Bernie Sanders, American politician who was first elected to represent Vermont in the U.S. Senate in 2006 and took office the following year. Previously he served (1981–89) as the mayor of Burlington, Vermont, and as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1991–2007). Formally unaffiliated

  • Sanders, Betty (American educator and activist)

    Betty Shabazz, American educator and civil rights activist, who is perhaps best known as the wife of slain black nationalist leader Malcolm X. Sanders was raised in Detroit by adoptive parents in a comfortable middle-class home and was active in a Methodist church. Upon high school graduation, she

  • Sanders, Charles Alvin (American football player)

    Charlie Sanders, (Charles Alvin Sanders), American football player (born Aug. 25, 1946, Richlands, N.C.—died July 2, 2015, Royal Oak, Mich.), as tight end for the NFL Detroit Lions (1968–77), was a talented pass receiver and a potent threat in an era when tight ends largely functioned to block

  • Sanders, Charlie (American football player)

    Charlie Sanders, (Charles Alvin Sanders), American football player (born Aug. 25, 1946, Richlands, N.C.—died July 2, 2015, Royal Oak, Mich.), as tight end for the NFL Detroit Lions (1968–77), was a talented pass receiver and a potent threat in an era when tight ends largely functioned to block

  • Sanders, Colonel (American businessman)

    Harland Sanders, American business executive, a dapper self-styled Southern gentleman whose white hair, white goatee, white double-breasted suits, and black string ties became a trademark in countries worldwide for Kentucky Fried Chicken. Sanders, who quit school in seventh grade, held a variety of

  • Sanders, Deion (American football and baseball player)

    Deion Sanders, American gridiron football player and baseball player who is the only person to have played in both a Super Bowl and a World Series. Known for his flashy personality and outspokenness, Sanders was a middling professional baseball player but is widely considered the best man-to-man

  • Sanders, Deion Luwynn (American football and baseball player)

    Deion Sanders, American gridiron football player and baseball player who is the only person to have played in both a Super Bowl and a World Series. Known for his flashy personality and outspokenness, Sanders was a middling professional baseball player but is widely considered the best man-to-man

  • Sanders, George (Russian-born British actor)

    George Sanders, Russian-born British actor who specialized in portraying elegant yet dissolute characters and was most noted for his roles as villains. Sanders spent his childhood in Russia, but his British family moved to Hampshire, England, at the time of the Russian Revolution. According to his

  • Sanders, Harland (American businessman)

    Harland Sanders, American business executive, a dapper self-styled Southern gentleman whose white hair, white goatee, white double-breasted suits, and black string ties became a trademark in countries worldwide for Kentucky Fried Chicken. Sanders, who quit school in seventh grade, held a variety of

  • Sanders, Nicholas (English scholar)

    Nicholas Sanders, English Roman Catholic scholar, controversialist, and historian of the English Reformation. He was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, at which university he became a lecturer in canon law. He left England shortly after the accession of Elizabeth I in order to be free

  • Sanders, Otto Liman von (German general)

    Otto Liman von Sanders, German general largely responsible for making the Ottoman army an effective fighting force in World War I and victor over the Allies at Gallipoli. Liman began his military career in 1874 and rose to the rank of lieutenant general. In 1913 he was appointed director of a

  • Sanders, Sarah Huckabee (American press secretary)

    Steve Bannon: Association with Trump: …August 18, 2017, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders announced that “White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Steve Bannon have mutually agreed today would be Steve’s last day,” though it was widely thought that Bannon had been forced to resign.

  • Sandersiella acuminata (crustacean)

    horseshoe shrimp: Sandersiella acuminata, 2.4 mm (0.094 inch) long, is found in waters near Japan and New Caledonia.

  • Sanderson, Frederick William (British educator)

    Frederick William Sanderson, English schoolmaster whose reorganization of Oundle School had considerable influence on the curriculum and methods of secondary education. In 1889 Sanderson became senior physics master at Dulwich College, London. In 1892 he was appointed headmaster of Oundle, near

  • Sanderson, Sibyl Swift (American opera singer)

    Sibyl Swift Sanderson, American-born opera singer whose native country failed to yield her the considerable appreciation she found in continental Europe. Sanderson early showed remarkable vocal talent, and in 1881, at the age of 15, she was taken to Paris to study singing. After two years she

  • sandesa kavya (Manipravalam poetry)

    Malayalam literature: Early period to the 19th century: …the many Manipravalam works are sandesa kavyas and campus. The former, modeled on the Meghaduta of Kalidasa (c. 5th century ce), are “message poems” consisting of two parts: the first giving an account of the circumstances in which the message must be sent and the route by which it should…

  • sandfish (lizard)

    skink: Sand skinks (Scincus), also called sandfish, run across and “swim” through windblown sand aided by fringes of scales on their toes. Their countersunk lower jaw, scales that partially cover the ear openings, specialized nasal openings, and fringes on the eyelids allow them to move through…

  • sandfish (fish)

    Sandfish, any of several unrelated marine fishes found along sandy shores. Sandfishes, or beaked salmon, of the species Gonorhynchus gonorhynchus (family Gonorhynchidae) live in shallow to deep Indo-Pacific waters and can burrow rapidly in sand. They are slender fishes up to 37.5 cm (15 inches)

  • sandfly (insect)

    Mayfly, (order Ephemeroptera), any member of a group of insects known for their extremely short life spans and emergence in large numbers in the summer months. Other common names for the winged stages are shadfly, sandfly, dayfly, fishfly, and drake. The aquatic immature stage, called a nymph or

  • sandfly fever (pathology)

    Pappataci fever, acute, infectious, febrile disease caused by a phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) and producing temporary incapacitation. It is transmitted to humans by the bloodsucking female sand fly (notably Phlebotomus papatasii, P. perniciosus, and P. perfiliewsi) and is prevalent in the moist

  • Sandford and Merton (work by Day)

    children's literature: From T.W. to Alice (1712?–1865): …Thomas Day, with his long-lived Sandford and Merton, were avowedly Rousseauist. Others took from him what appealed to them. Sarah Kirby Trimmer, whose Fabulous Histories specialized in piety, opposed the presumably free-thinking Rousseau on religious grounds but was in other respects strongly influenced by him. The same is true of…

  • sandglass (time-measuring device)

    Hourglass, an early device for measuring intervals of time. It is also known as a sandglass or a log glass when used in conjunction with the common log for ascertaining the speed of a ship. It consists of two pear-shaped bulbs of glass, united at their apexes and having a minute passage formed

  • sandgrouse (bird)

    Sandgrouse, (order Pteroclidiformes), any of 16 species of birds of Asian and African deserts. According to some systems of classification, sandgrouse are ranked with the plovers within the order Charadriiformes. Sandgrouses are about 22 to 40 cm (about 9 to 16 inches) long and have gray or brown

  • sandhi (phonology)

    Irish language: In phonology it exhibits initial sandhi, in which the first consonant of a word is modified according to the prehistoric final sound of the previous word in the phrase (e.g., an tobar “the well,” mo thobar “my well”).

  • sandhill crane (bird)

    Sandhill crane, (Grus canadensis), Crane species (family Gruidae), 35–43 inches (90–110 cm) long, with a red crown, a bluish or brownish gray body tinged with sandy yellow, and a long, harsh, penetrating call. It is one of the oldest of all existing bird species. It breeds from Alaska to Hudson

  • Sandhills (New South Wales, Australia)

    Deniliquin, chief town of the fertile southern Riverina region, south-central New South Wales, Australia. It lies on the Edward River (a branch of the Murray), 22 miles (35 km) from the Victoria border. It was established in 1845 by entrepreneur Benjamin Boyd as a personal holding and was made a

  • Sandhurst (England, United Kingdom)

    Sandhurst, town (parish), Bracknell Forest unitary authority, historic county of Berkshire, southeastern England. It is situated 9 miles (14 km) north of the town and military base of Aldershot. Sandhurst, which lies some 30 miles (48 km) west-southwest of central London, is best known for the

  • Sandhurst (Victoria, Australia)

    Bendigo, city, central Victoria, Australia, in the central upland area of the state; it is about 93 miles (150 km) northwest of Melbourne by road. Founded as a sheep run in 1840, the city’s official name was Sandhurst until 1891, when it was formally changed to honour a local prizefighter who

  • Sandhurst (military academy, Sandhurst, England, United Kingdom)

    Sandhurst: …at the academy, commonly called Sandhurst. This academy is heir to the functions performed up to 1939 by both the Royal Military Academy (founded 1741) at Woolwich, London, and the Royal Military College at Sandhurst. The latter was established by royal warrant in 1802 at Great Marlow, largely as a…

  • Sandia Crest (mountain, New Mexico, United States)

    Sandia Mountains: …10,678 feet (3,255 metres) at Sandia Crest, which is topped by television towers. The Sandia Peak Aerial Tramway and Ski Area provide year-round recreational facilities, with a November-to-April ski season; the aerial tramway is the world’s longest cable-car route. A cave in the mountains has yielded artifacts of the so-called…

  • Sandia Man (prehistoric group)

    Sandia Mountains: …yielded artifacts of the so-called “Sandia Man,” a prehistoric Indian group that is thought to date to 23,000 bce. In Pueblo mythology the Sandia Mountains were sacred, marking the southern boundary of the Tiwa-speaking Indian territory.

  • Sandia Mountains (mountains, New Mexico, United States)

    Sandia Mountains, mountain range in central New Mexico, U.S., northeast of Albuquerque and east of the Rio Grande. Located largely within a part of the Cibola National Forest, the range extends southward for about 30 miles (48 km), and the mountains continue on as the Manzano Mountains. It is

  • Sandia Peak (mountain, New Mexico, United States)

    Sandia Mountains: …10,678 feet (3,255 metres) at Sandia Crest, which is topped by television towers. The Sandia Peak Aerial Tramway and Ski Area provide year-round recreational facilities, with a November-to-April ski season; the aerial tramway is the world’s longest cable-car route. A cave in the mountains has yielded artifacts of the so-called…

  • Sandinista (political and military organization, Nicaragua)

    Sandinista, one of a Nicaraguan group that overthrew President Anastasio Somoza Debayle in 1979, ending 46 years of dictatorship by the Somoza family. The Sandinistas governed Nicaragua from 1979 to 1990. Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega was reelected as president in 2006, 2011, and 2016. Named for

  • Sandinista National Liberation Front (political and military organization, Nicaragua)

    Sandinista, one of a Nicaraguan group that overthrew President Anastasio Somoza Debayle in 1979, ending 46 years of dictatorship by the Somoza family. The Sandinistas governed Nicaragua from 1979 to 1990. Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega was reelected as president in 2006, 2011, and 2016. Named for

  • Sandinista! (album by the Clash)

    the Clash: …constituencies with London Calling’s follow-up, Sandinista! (1980), a triple album that unfortunately produced no hits. Combat Rock (1982), the last album to feature the classic triumvirate of Strummer, Jones, and Simonon, yielded the hit “Rock the Casbah,” which ironically was later appropriated as an American battle anthem during the Persian…

  • Sandino, Augusto César (Nicaraguan leader)

    César Augusto Sandino, Nicaraguan guerrilla leader, one of the most controversial figures of 20th-century Central American history. In Nicaragua he became a popular hero and gave his name to the Sandinistas, a revolutionary group that formed the government from 1979 to 1990. Sandino first gained

  • Sandino, César Augusto (Nicaraguan leader)

    César Augusto Sandino, Nicaraguan guerrilla leader, one of the most controversial figures of 20th-century Central American history. In Nicaragua he became a popular hero and gave his name to the Sandinistas, a revolutionary group that formed the government from 1979 to 1990. Sandino first gained

  • Sanditon (work by Austen)

    Jane Austen: Life: In January 1817 she began Sanditon, a robust and self-mocking satire on health resorts and invalidism. This novel remained unfinished because of Austen’s declining health. She supposed that she was suffering from bile, but the symptoms make possible a modern clinical assessment that she was suffering from Addison disease. Her…

  • Sandler, Adam (American comedian)

    Adam Sandler, American comedian known for his portrayal of infantile but endearing characters. Sandler was raised in Manchester, New Hampshire, the youngest of four children. Academically disinclined, he was frequently disciplined for his comedic antics in school. He first performed at a stand-up

  • Sandler, Adam Richard (American comedian)

    Adam Sandler, American comedian known for his portrayal of infantile but endearing characters. Sandler was raised in Manchester, New Hampshire, the youngest of four children. Academically disinclined, he was frequently disciplined for his comedic antics in school. He first performed at a stand-up

  • Sandler, Boris (author)

    Yiddish literature: The 21st century: Sandler was born in Belz (B?l?i, Moldova) and studied in Kishinev (Chi?in?u). He moved to Israel in 1990 and published several prose volumes in Yiddish, including Toyren (1997; “Gates”), a strong collection of short stories that evoke the experiences of Russian immigrants in Israel. His…

  • Sandman (American dancer)

    Howard Sims, (“Sandman”), American tap dancer (born Jan. 24, 1917, Fort Smith, Ark.—died May 20, 2003, Bronx, N.Y.), got his nickname from dancing on sand to achieve a unique soft brushing sound. In addition to dancing, he taught footwork to such dancers as Gregory Hines (q.v.) and Ben Vereen as w

  • Sandman, The (comic by Gaiman)

    Neil Gaiman: …clearer with the launch of The Sandman in 1989.

  • Sandman, The (story by Hoffmann)

    Coppélia: …story “Der Sandmann” (1816; “The Sandman”), a dark psychological fantasy concerning a man’s destructive infatuation for a lifelike mechanical doll. The same tale was later featured in Jacques Offenbach’s The Tales of Hoffmann, which preserved the tragic and surreal mood of the original. Delibes, however, presented French audiences with…

  • Sandmann, Der (story by Hoffmann)

    Coppélia: …story “Der Sandmann” (1816; “The Sandman”), a dark psychological fantasy concerning a man’s destructive infatuation for a lifelike mechanical doll. The same tale was later featured in Jacques Offenbach’s The Tales of Hoffmann, which preserved the tragic and surreal mood of the original. Delibes, however, presented French audiences with…

  • Sandnes (Norway)

    Sandnes, town, southwestern Norway. Located at the head of Gands Fjord, which is a branch of Bokna Fjord, Sandnes is the chief port for the surrounding J?ren agricultural region. It has excellent road and rail connections with Stavanger and the remainder of southern Norway. The town produces

  • Sand? Bridge (bridge, Sweden)

    bridge: Early bridges: …eclipsed in length by the Sand? Bridge over the ?ngerman River in Sweden. The Sand? Bridge is a thin, single-ribbed, reinforced-concrete arch with a span of 260 metres (866 feet), rising 39 metres (131 feet) above the river.

  • Sandogo (African society)

    African art: Senufo: …parallel initiation society known as Sandogo. The divination shrines of Sandogo contain small sculptures, images of the messenger python (fo), and assorted divination materials. The spirits may order clients to commission and wear brass amulets and jewelry to communicate with spirits and reiterate basic values. Some Sandogo shrines have elaborately…

  • Sandomierz (Poland)

    Sandomierz, city, ?wi?tokrzyskie województwo (province), southeastern Poland. It is situated on the left bank of the Vistula River above the latter’s confluence with the San River. First mentioned in 1097, Sandomierz gained early importance because of its geographic position astride the trade route

  • Sandomierz Agreement (Poland [1570])

    Poland: Social and cultural developments: The Sandomierz Agreement of 1570, which defended religious freedom, marked the cooperation of Polish Lutherans and Calvinists. The Polish Brethren (known also as Arians and Anti-Trinitarians) made a major contribution by preaching social egalitarianism and pacifism. In 1573 the szlachta concluded the Compact of Warsaw, which…

  • Sandomierz Basin (region, Poland)

    Sandomierz Basin, lowland region, southeastern Poland, located south of the Lublin Uplands and north of the Western Carpathian foothills. It is drained by the Vistula River and its tributary the San River. The Sandomierz Basin is a structural depression with natural transportation routes connecting

  • Sandor, Gyorgy (American musician)

    Gyorgy Sandor, Hungarian-born American pianist (born Sept. 21, 1912, Budapest, Hung.—died Dec. 9, 2005, New York, N.Y.), specialized in the works of Eastern European composers, notably his countrymen Zoltan Kodaly (with whom he studied composition) and Bela Bartok (with whom he studied piano). S

  • Sandow, Eugen (German athlete)

    Eugen Sandow, physical culturist who, as a strongman, bodybuilder, and showman, became a symbol of robust manhood in fin de siècle England and America. Sandow, after a brief period of study with the legendary strongman Louis Durlacher (“Professor Attila”), first attracted attention by breaking

  • Sandoway (Myanmar)

    Sandoway, town and major seaport, southern Myanmar (Burma). It lies along the Bay of Bengal at the mouth of the Sandoway River. An old established settlement, it was reputedly once the capital of the ancient empire of Arakan. Engaged in coastal trade with Akyab and Ramree islands, it is the site

  • Sandoz AG (Swiss company)

    Albert Hofmann: …graduation he was hired by Sandoz Laboratories in Basel, where he was assigned to a program developing methods for synthesizing compounds found in medicinal plants. It was there, while testing the analeptic (stimulant) properties of ergot derivatives, that Hofmann stumbled upon LSD-25 (the 25th such derivative tested) in 1938.

  • Sandoz, Mari (American author)

    Mari Sandoz, American biographer and novelist known for her scrupulously researched books portraying the early American West. Sandoz’s life as a student and teacher in rural Nebraska—a rigorous life that left her blind in one eye from a blizzard at age 13—prepared her to depict realistically

  • Sandoz, Mari Susette (American author)

    Mari Sandoz, American biographer and novelist known for her scrupulously researched books portraying the early American West. Sandoz’s life as a student and teacher in rural Nebraska—a rigorous life that left her blind in one eye from a blizzard at age 13—prepared her to depict realistically

  • sandpaper

    abrasive: Sandpapers: Sandpapers (coated abrasive) are the next most significant abrasive product. They consist, basically, of a single layer of abrasive particles held to a flexible backing material by an adhesive bond. The cutting action of coated abrasive products is determined by the abrasive used, the…

  • sandpaper vine (plant)

    Verbenaceae: …a woody evergreen vine called purple wreath, or sandpaper vine (P. volubilis). It bears long, hanging clusters of violet-blue pansylike flowers and has oval leaves so rough as to be likened to sandpaper. The 220 species of the genus Lippia bear clusters of white, rose, or purplish flowers. L. canescens…

  • sandperch (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Pinguipedidae (sandperches) Some resemble labrids in long dorsal and anal fins (sometimes with few spines), enlarged lips that appear to curl back, and enlarged canines at front of jaws. Body elongated, cylindrical; usually spotted and banded; eyes near top of head. Size from small up to…

  • sandpiper (bird)

    Sandpiper, any of numerous shorebirds belonging to the family Scolopacidae (order Charadriiformes), which also includes the woodcocks and the snipes. The name sandpiper refers particularly to several species of small to middle-sized birds, about 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 inches) long, that throng sea

  • Sandpiper, The (film by Minnelli [1965])

    Vincente Minnelli: Films of the 1960s and 1970s: Home from the Hill, Bells are Ringing, and On a Clear Day You Can See Forever: The Sandpiper (1965) was the final Venice production and Minnelli’s last MGM picture, ending over 20 years of collaboration. It was an ineffective drama, with Taylor miscast as a beatnik artist and Richard Burton as the married clergyman with whom she falls in love.

  • Sandra Belloni (novel by Meredith)

    George Meredith: Beginnings as poet and novelist.: …Emilia in England (later renamed Sandra Belloni), was the contrast between a simple but passionate girl and some sentimental English social climbers—an excellent theme for Meredithian comedy. Its publication in 1864 was made the occasion of the first general consideration of all his works up to this point in an…

  • Sandrart, Joachim von (German artist)

    Matthias Grünewald: The German painter Joachim von Sandrart, the artist’s fervent admirer and first biographer (Teutsche Akademie, 1675), was responsible for preserving some of the scanty information that we have about the artist, as well as naming him, erroneously and from an obscure source, Grünewald. At the lowest ebb of…

  • Sandrich, Mark (American director)

    Mark Sandrich, American film director who was best known for his Fred Astaire–Ginger Rogers musicals, notably Top Hat (1935). Sandrich attended Columbia University before taking his first job in the movie business as a prop man. In 1926 he began directing comedy shorts, and two years later he

  • Sandrich, Mark Rex (American director)

    Mark Sandrich, American film director who was best known for his Fred Astaire–Ginger Rogers musicals, notably Top Hat (1935). Sandrich attended Columbia University before taking his first job in the movie business as a prop man. In 1926 he began directing comedy shorts, and two years later he

  • Sandridge, Baron Churchill of (English general)

    John Churchill, 1st duke of Marlborough, one of England’s greatest generals, who led British and allied armies to important victories over Louis XIV of France, notably at Blenheim (1704), Ramillies (1706), and Oudenaarde (1708). John Churchill was the son of Sir Winston Churchill, member of

  • Sandringham (England, United Kingdom)

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