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  • Santa Fe Railway (American railway)

    Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, former railway that was one of the largest in the United States. Chartered in Kansas as the Atchison and Topeka Railroad Company in 1859, it later exercised great influence on the settlement of the southwestern United States. It was renamed the

  • Santa Fe Trail (film by Curtiz [1940])

    Michael Curtiz: The late 1930s and the 1940s: …of 1940, the misleadingly titled Santa Fe Trail, was a fanciful retelling of the story of abolitionist John Brown (Raymond Massey), with Flynn and Ronald Reagan along for the ride as Jeb Stuart and George Armstrong Custer, respectively.

  • Santa Fe Trail (trail, United States)

    Santa Fe Trail, in U.S. history, famed wagon trail from Independence, Mo., to Santa Fe, N.M., an important commercial route (1821–80). Opened by William Becknell, a trader, the trail was used by merchant wagon caravans travelling in parallel columns, which, when Indians attacked, as they did

  • Santa Fede, Armata della (Italian history)

    Italy: Collapse of the republics: Their Armata della Santa Fede (“Army of the Holy Faith”) was the most important peasant uprising in the history of modern Italy. Invoking God and king, they devastated the castles of the aristocracy and occupied communal lands that the local barons had usurped; they also killed…

  • Santa Gertrudis (breed of cattle)

    Santa Gertrudis, breed of beef cattle developed in the 20th century by the King Ranch in Texas. It originally resulted from crossing Brahman bulls of about seven-eighths pure breeding and purebred Shorthorn cows. Over a period of years beginning with first crosses in 1910, selective breeding was

  • Santa Giulia (monastery, Brescia, Italy)

    Italy: Socioeconomic developments in the countryside: …example, those of Bobbio and Santa Giulia at Brescia, whose estate records survive. They produced a sizable agricultural surplus, which the estates’ owners often sold in the cities (Santa Giulia, at least, had its own merchants). Not all estates, however, were organized this tightly; elsewhere demesnes, though common, tended to…

  • Santa Giustina of Padua, Congregation of (religion)

    Benedictine: …and became known as the Cassinese Congregation. There were similar reforms throughout Europe. These reforms were confronted by the turmoil of the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. Within a few years (1525–60) the monasteries and nunneries disappeared almost entirely from northern Europe and suffered greatly in France and central…

  • Santa Hermandad

    Santa Hermandad, constabulary created in the late 15th century by the Catholic Monarchs (Ferdinand and Isabella) to maintain law and order throughout Spain. See

  • Santa Isabel (national capital, Equatorial Guinea)

    Malabo, capital of Equatorial Guinea. It lies on the northern edge of the island of Bioko (or Fernando Po) on the rim of a sunken volcano. With an average temperature of 77 °F (25 °C) and an annual rainfall of 75 inches (1,900 mm), it has one of the more onerous climates in the Bight of Biafra

  • Santa Isabel (island, Solomon Islands)

    Santa Isabel, island, central Solomon Islands, southwestern Pacific Ocean, 50 miles (80 km) northwest of Guadalcanal. About 130 miles (209 km) long and 20 miles (32 km) across at its widest point, it has a mountainous backbone with Mount Marescot (4,000 feet [1,219 metres]) as its highest peak. A

  • Santa Isabel Peak (mountain, Equatorial Guinea)

    Bioko: …with its highest point being Santa Isabel Peak (9,869 feet [3,008 m]). Malabo, the republic’s capital and chief port, stands near a crater breached by the sea.

  • Santa language

    Mongolian languages: …Monguor (Tu), Bao’an (Bonan), and Santa (Dongxiang) in the south—were isolated from the main body of Mongolian languages when the tide of Mongol conquest receded. These languages diverged from the main group of Mongolian dialects and to this day retain archaic features characteristic of Middle Mongolian that have been lost…

  • Santa Lucía Hill (hill, Santiago, Chile)

    Santiago: …River and by Huelén (renamed Santa Lucía) Hill to the east, which served as a lookout.

  • Santa Lucia Range (mountains, California, United States)

    Santa Lucia Range, segment of the Coast Ranges (see Pacific mountain system), west-central California, U.S. The rugged range extends southeastward for about 140 miles (225 km) from Carmel Bay to the Cuyama River in Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties. Lowest in the south, the range rises to 5,862

  • Santa Luiza de Mossoró (Brazil)

    Mossoró, city, northwestern Rio Grande do Norte estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It lies on the Apodi River, about 30 miles (50 km) from its mouth on the Atlantic coast, at 66 feet (20 metres) above sea level. Formerly known as Santa Luzia de Mossoró, it was given city status in 1870 and is now

  • Santa Luzia Island (island, Atlantic Ocean)

    Santa Luzia Island, island of Cape Verde, situated in the Atlantic Ocean about 400 miles (640 km) off the West African coast between the islands of S?o Nicolau and S?o Vicente. It has an area of 14 square miles (35 square km) and rises to an altitude of 1,296 feet (395 metres). The island is

  • Santa Maria (Brazil)

    Santa Maria, city, central Rio Grande do Sul estado (state), southern Brazil, lying in the Jacuí River valley at an elevation of 502 feet (153 metres). Founded in 1797, it was given city status in 1876. The community was once called Santa Maria da B?ca do Monte (“St. Mary of the Mountain’s Mouth”)

  • Santa Maria (island, Vanuatu)

    Santa Maria, largest of the Banks Islands in Vanuatu, southwestern Pacific Ocean. The island, with an area of 132 square miles (342 square km), is rugged and rises to Garet, an active volcano (2,615 feet [797 metres]) that contains a lake in its caldera at 1,404 feet (428 metres). The volcano has

  • Santa María (ship)

    Santa María, Christopher Columbus’ flagship on his first voyage to America. About 117 feet (36 metres) long, the “Santa María” had a deck, three masts, and forecastle and sterncastle and was armed with bombards that fired granite balls. She performed well in the voyage but ran aground off Haiti on

  • Santa maria (tree)

    South America: Tropical and subtropical rainforests: Characteristic trees are, among others, jacareúbas (Calophyllum brasiliense), which is a tall tree with hard reddish brown wood used for heavy construction, araparis (Macrolobium acaciaefolium), abiuranas (Lucuma species), piranheiras (Piranhea trifoliata), and louros-do-igapo (Nectandra amazonum). Undergrowth is dense.

  • Santa Maria Capua Vetere (ancient city, Italy)

    Capua, in ancient times, the chief city of the Campania region of Italy; it was located 16 miles (26 km) north of Neapolis (Naples) on the site of modern Santa Maria Capua Vetere. The nearby modern city of Capua was called Casilinum in antiquity. Ancient Capua was founded in c. 600 bc, probably by

  • Santa Maria Capua Vetere (ancient city, Italy)

    Capua, in ancient times, the chief city of the Campania region of Italy; it was located 16 miles (26 km) north of Neapolis (Naples) on the site of modern Santa Maria Capua Vetere. The nearby modern city of Capua was called Casilinum in antiquity. Ancient Capua was founded in c. 600 bc, probably by

  • Santa Maria d’Aracoeli (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: The Capitoline: The church of Santa Maria d’Aracoeli, built before the 6th century and remade in its present form in the 13th, is lined with columns rifled from Classical buildings. It is the home of “Il Bambino,” a wooden statue (originally a 15th-century statue; now a copy) of the Christ…

  • Santa Maria da B?ca do Monte (Brazil)

    Santa Maria, city, central Rio Grande do Sul estado (state), southern Brazil, lying in the Jacuí River valley at an elevation of 502 feet (153 metres). Founded in 1797, it was given city status in 1876. The community was once called Santa Maria da B?ca do Monte (“St. Mary of the Mountain’s Mouth”)

  • Santa Maria da Vitória (abbey, Batalha, Portugal)

    Batalha: …the great Dominican monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, also known simply as the monastery of Batalha (“Battle”), which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1983.

  • Santa Maria de Belém (parish, Lisbon, Portugal)

    Belém, freguesia (parish) within the western limits of the city of Lisbon, Portugal. It is situated on the northern shore of the Tagus (Tejo) River estuary near its outlet to the Atlantic Ocean. A former royal residence, Belém (Bethlehem) is known for its Manueline (early 16th-century)

  • Santa María de la Antigua (Spanish settlement, Panama)

    Vasco Nú?ez de Balboa: Career in the New World: …they founded the town of Santa María de la Antigua, the first stable settlement on the continent, and began to acquire gold by barter or war with the local Indians. The colonists soon deposed Enciso, Ojeda’s second in command, and elected a town council; one of its two alcaldes, or…

  • Santa María de la Antigua del Darian (Spanish settlement, Panama)

    Vasco Nú?ez de Balboa: Career in the New World: …they founded the town of Santa María de la Antigua, the first stable settlement on the continent, and began to acquire gold by barter or war with the local Indians. The colonists soon deposed Enciso, Ojeda’s second in command, and elected a town council; one of its two alcaldes, or…

  • Santa María de la Antigua del Darién (Spanish settlement, Panama)

    Vasco Nú?ez de Balboa: Career in the New World: …they founded the town of Santa María de la Antigua, the first stable settlement on the continent, and began to acquire gold by barter or war with the local Indians. The colonists soon deposed Enciso, Ojeda’s second in command, and elected a town council; one of its two alcaldes, or…

  • Santa María de la Encarnación (cathedral, Granada, Spain)

    Granada: …stands the Gothic Cathedral of Santa María de la Encarnación (1523–1703), containing the Royal Chapel (Capilla Real) with the tomb of Ferdinand and Isabella and a display of heraldic decoration. The cathedral is profusely ornamented with jasper and coloured marble, and its interior contains many fine paintings and sculptures by…

  • Santa María de Montserrat (monastery, Catalonia, Spain)

    Montserrat: …and the Benedictine monastery of Santa María de Montserrat, which houses an ancient wooden statue of the Virgin and Child that was supposedly carved by St. Luke, taken to Spain by St. Peter, and hidden in a cave during the Moorish occupation. The statue was found in 880 and has…

  • Santa María de Puerto Príncipe (Cuba)

    Camagüey, city, capital of Camagüey provincia (province), east-central Cuba. It is situated on the San Pedro River, about 25 miles (40 km) southeast of Florida. The city was founded in 1514 as Santa María del Puerto del Príncipe (also called Puerto Príncipe), at the site of present-day Nuevitas,

  • Santa Maria degli Angeli (church, Florence, Italy)

    Western architecture: Early Renaissance in Italy (1401–95): …a central-plan church, that of Santa Maria degli Angeli (begun 1434) at Florence, which was never completed. It was very important because it was the first central-plan church of the Renaissance, the type of plan which dominates Renaissance thinking. The plan is an octagon on the interior and 16-sided on…

  • Santa Maria dei Frari (church, Venice, Italy)

    Santa Maria dei Frari, Franciscan church in Venice, originally built in the mid-13th century but rebuilt in Gothic style in the 15th century. This important example of Venetian Gothic ecclesiastical architecture (often referred to simply as the Frari) contains many masterpieces of Venetian

  • Santa Maria dei Miracoli (church, Venice, Italy)

    Pietro Lombardo: …sculptor for the Church of Santa Maria dei Miracoli (1481–89), which is considered one of the finest Renaissance buildings in Venice. In 1482 he executed the tomb of Dante in Ravenna and in 1485 began work on his most distinguished monument, the Zanetti tomb in the cathedral at Treviso, for…

  • Santa Maria dei Miracoli (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Piazza del Popolo: …oval plan and dome, while Santa Maria dei Miracoli, on the narrower plot toward the Tiber on the west, has a round dome. Carlo Rainaldi, the architect, turned both facades slightly inward to frame the welcoming parades that would proceed up the Corso between the two churches. One of the…

  • Santa Maria del Carmine, Church of (church, Pisa, Italy)

    Masaccio: Early life and works: …sizable, multi-paneled altarpiece for the Church of Santa Maria del Carmine at Pisa in 1426. This important commission demonstrates his growing reputation outside Florence. Unfortunately, the Pisa altarpiece was dismantled in the 18th century and many of its parts lost, but 13 sections of it have been rediscovered and identified…

  • Santa Maria del Carmine, Church of (church, Florence, Italy)

    Florence: City layout: …Arno lies the modest Carmelite church of Santa Maria del Carmine, whose Brancacci Chapel displays some of the most powerful early 15th-century frescoes by Masaccio and Masolino (c. 1425–27). The frescoes have been restored to their former glory, bringing out colours and details that had long been obscured.

  • Santa Maria del Fiore, Cathedral of (cathedral, Florence, Italy)

    construction: Reintroduction of dome construction: …or bell tower, of the cathedral of Florence. The design was made by the painter Giotto and constructed by cathedral masons from 1334 to 1359.

  • Santa Maria del Popolo (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Piazza del Popolo: …church next to the gate, Santa Maria del Popolo, which stood for centuries before the piazza existed and gives its name to the area, was founded in 1227 to replace a 1099 chapel built over what was presumed to be the emperor Nero’s tomb. It was replaced in 1472–77 by…

  • Santa Maria del Priorato (church, Rome, Italy)

    Western architecture: Italy: In the church of Santa Maria del Priorato, Piranesi incorporated Classical references that were to greatly influence the succeeding generation of architects.

  • Santa Maria del Rosario (church, Cento, Italy)

    Cento: …built in the church of Santa Maria del Rosario for the 17th-century Baroque painter Guercino (G.F. Barbieri), who is represented in the local art gallery and was born in Cento. Several churches, notably the Santa Maria del Rosario, also contain the painter’s works. The town, which is overlooked by the…

  • Santa Maria della Catena (church, Palermo, Italy)

    Matteo Carnelivari: Thus, in the church of Santa Maria della Catena (“Saint Mary of the Chain”)—a work not unanimously attributed to Carnelivari—the traditional architectonic structure, based on a plan with a nave and two aisles and a raised Greek cross presbytery, has been refined and made lighter and airier by the complex…

  • Santa Maria della Consolazione (church, Todi, Italy)

    Western architecture: High Renaissance in Italy (1495–1520): The church of Santa Maria della Consolazione (1504–1617) at Todi, probably by Bramante, is likewise centralized in plan, being square with a semicircular or polygonal apse opening off each side. The mass is built up of simple geometric forms capped by the cylinder of a drum and a…

  • Santa Maria della Pace (monastery, Rome, Italy)

    Donato Bramante: Roman period: …the monastery and cloister of Santa Maria della Pace (finished 1504). Bramante seems to have been engaged in 1502 to begin the small church known as the Tempietto in San Pietro in Montorio, on the site where St. Peter was said to have been crucified.

  • Santa Maria della Piazza (church, Ancona, Italy)

    Ancona: …11th- to 12th-century Church of Santa Maria della Piazza, with an ornate facade dating from 1210 and remains of 5th- and 7th-century mosaics; and the 12th- to 13th-century Cathedral of San Ciriaco, which is supposed to occupy the site of a Roman temple of Venus and incorporates the remains of…

  • Santa Maria della Salute (church, Venice, Italy)

    Baldassare Longhena: Longhena’s masterpiece, the Church of Santa Maria della Salute (1631/32–1687) at the entrance to the Grand Canal in Venice, was commissioned by the republic in thanksgiving to God for deliverance from the plague of 1630. Longhena’s unique design called for an octagonal church with a huge dome; sculptured figures standing…

  • Santa Maria della Vittoria (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Santa Maria della Vittoria: Built during 1605–26, Santa Maria della Vittoria harbours an unfailing crowd-pleaser, Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s The Ecstasy of St. Teresa (1645–52). It is conceived entirely in theatrical terms, even to having the Cornaro family (in marble) seated in opera boxes at the…

  • Santa Maria delle Grazie (church, Milan, Italy)

    Last Supper: …1498 for the Dominican monastery Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan. It depicts the dramatic scene described in several closely connected moments in the Gospels, including Matthew 26:21–28, in which Jesus declares that one of the Apostles will betray him and later institutes the Eucharist. According to Leonardo’s belief that…

  • Santa Maria delle Vergini, Church of (church, Macerata, Italy)

    Macerata: …the cathedral (1771–90), and the Church of Santa Maria delle Vergini (1555–73), with a painting by Tintoretto. Macerata is the seat of a university with a faculty of jurisprudence, founded in 1290, and of several other learned institutions.

  • Santa Maria di Montesanto (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Piazza del Popolo: Santa Maria in Montesanto, on the east, has an oval plan and dome, while Santa Maria dei Miracoli, on the narrower plot toward the Tiber on the west, has a round dome. Carlo Rainaldi, the architect, turned both facades slightly inward to frame the welcoming…

  • Santa Maria di Piedigrotta (church, Naples, Italy)

    Naples: Layout and architecture: The nearby church of Santa Maria di Piedigrotta, centre of a now-diminished popular festival, is steeply overlooked by a small park encompassing the entrance to the Roman grotto called the Crypta Neapolitana. This poignant place also contains the Roman columbarium known as the Tomb of Virgil, and the sepulchre…

  • Santa Maria di Siponto (church, Manfredonia, Italy)

    Manfredonia: The Romanesque church of Sta. Maria di Siponto (1117), 2 miles (3 km) southwest, marks the site of the ancient Sipontum, conquered by the Romans in 217 bc and the see of a bishop from the 1st century ad. Abandoned in the 13th century because nearby stagnant lagoons had…

  • Santa Maria in Campitelli (church, Rome, Italy)

    Carlo Rainaldi: Generally regarded as his masterpiece, Santa Maria in Campitelli (1663–67) shows a northern Italian rather than Roman influence. The use in the facade of many freestanding columns, stressing verticality, also derives from north Italian tradition. Rainaldi’s last important work was the grand facade uniting the old apse of Santa Maria…

  • Santa Maria in Trastevere (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Trastevere: The Trastevere (“Across the Tiber”) district, long the home of powerful Roman families, features palaces built during the Renaissance (e.g., the Villa Farnesina) and later (e.g., the 18th-century Palazzo Corsini). Most of the streets are still narrow and without sidewalks. Every 100 paces or…

  • Santa Maria Island (island, Portugal)

    Santa Maria Island, southeasternmost island of the Azores archipelago (a part of Portugal), in the North Atlantic Ocean. It has an area of 37 square miles (97 square km). Its economy is based chiefly on fishing and cattle raising, and cereals and vines are cultivated. On the island’s western

  • Santa María Island (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Santa María Island, one of the southernmost Galapagos Islands, in the eastern Pacific Ocean about 600 miles (965 km) west of mainland Ecuador. Originally named for the British king Charles II, it is also known as Isla Floreana, but the official Ecuadoran name is Isla Santa María. The island, with

  • Santa María la Real de las Huelgas (monastery, Burgos, Spain)

    Burgos: …Esteban (1280–1350); the monastery of Santa María la Real de las Huelgas, which was originally a summer palace of the kings of Castile and was transformed into a Cistercian convent in 1187 by Alfonso VIII; and numerous convents and monasteries in the environs of the city.

  • Santa Maria la Redonda (island, Antigua and Barbuda)

    Redonda, the smallest of the three islands that constitute the nation of Antigua and Barbuda. Redonda is located among the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean Sea, approximately 35 miles (55 km) from the nearest point in Antigua, to the east. Redonda is a rugged, uninhabited rock, the remnant

  • Santa Maria Maggiore (church, Como, Italy)

    Como: …landmarks include the Cathedral of Santa Maria Maggiore (14th–18th century), a fine example of the fusion of Gothic and Renaissance styles; the Broletto, or Communal Tower (1215; facade rebuilt 1435), the former city hall; and the Church of Sant’ Abbondio, formerly the cathedral, consecrated in 1095 on the site of…

  • Santa Maria Maggiore (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Santa Maria Maggiore: Located on the Esquiline Hill, Santa Maria Maggiore was founded in 432, just after the Council of Ephesus in 431, which upheld the belief that Mary truly was the mother of God; it was thus the first great church of Mary in…

  • Santa Maria Novella (church, Florence, Italy)

    Santa Maria Novella, Italian Gothic-style church of the Dominicans in Florence. It was planned by two Dominican brothers, Sisto and Ristoro, and construction began c. 1278 and was completed in 1350, except for the facade, which was completed by Leon Battista Alberti in proto-Renaissance style

  • Santa Maria presso San Satiro (church, Milan, Italy)

    Donato Bramante: Lombard period: …working on the church of Santa Maria presso San Satiro, the first structure definitely attributed to him. Along with a certain adherence to local taste, this church shows traces of the influence of Alberti, Mantegna, Brunelleschi, and the Urbino school. This last influence is particularly evident in its choir, which…

  • Santa Maria Rotonda (building, Rome, Italy)

    Pantheon, building in Rome that was begun in 27 bc by the statesman Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, probably as a building of the ordinary Classical temple type—rectangular with a gabled roof supported by a colonnade on all sides. It was completely rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian sometime between ad 118

  • Santa Maria Rotunda (building, Rome, Italy)

    Pantheon, building in Rome that was begun in 27 bc by the statesman Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, probably as a building of the ordinary Classical temple type—rectangular with a gabled roof supported by a colonnade on all sides. It was completely rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian sometime between ad 118

  • Santa María, Cathedral of (cathedral, Murcia, Spain)

    Murcia: The 14th-century Gothic-style Cathedral of Santa María was restored in the 18th century. It contains the fine chapel of the Vélez family (1507). In the Hermitage of Jesus (Ermita de Jesús) are the majority of the Passion sculptures of Francisco Salzillo, which attract many visitors during Holy Week.…

  • Santa Maria, Cathedral of (cathedral, Sevilla, Spain)

    Sevilla: City layout: …the central district near the Cathedral of Santa Maria and the Alcázar Palace. Sevilla’s cathedral is one of the largest in area of all Gothic churches. Most of it was constructed from 1402 to 1506 on the site of the city’s principal mosque, which had been built by the Almohads…

  • Santa María, Salto de (waterfall, Argentina-Brazil)

    Igua?u Falls, series of cataracts on the Igua?u River, 14 miles (23 km) above its confluence with the Alto (Upper) Paraná River, at the Argentina-Brazil border. The falls resemble an elongated horseshoe that extends for 1.7 miles (2.7 km)—nearly three times wider than Niagara Falls in North America

  • Santa Marina de Gaete (Chile)

    Osorno, city, southern Chile, lying at the junction of the Damas and Rahue rivers, 40 miles (64 km) inland from the Pacific coast. It was founded in 1553 under the name Santa Marina de Gaete, but this attempt failed. It was refounded in 1558 by García Hurtado de Mendoza, who named it Ciudad de San

  • Santa Marta (Colombia)

    Santa Marta, city, northern Colombia. It is situated on a small bay of the Caribbean Sea, 40 miles (64 km) east-northeast of the mouth of the Magdalena River, to which it is connected by swampy channels and lakes. Founded in 1525, it is the oldest city in Colombia. It became a port for colonial New

  • Santa Marta Massif (mountain range, Colombia)

    Santa Marta Mountains, Andean mountain range, northern Colombia, bounded on the north by the Caribbean Sea and encircled on three sides by the coastal lowlands. The volcanic massif rises abruptly from the coast, culminating in snowcapped Pico (peak) Cristóbal Colón (18,947 ft [5,775 m] above sea

  • Santa Marta Mountains (mountain range, Colombia)

    Santa Marta Mountains, Andean mountain range, northern Colombia, bounded on the north by the Caribbean Sea and encircled on three sides by the coastal lowlands. The volcanic massif rises abruptly from the coast, culminating in snowcapped Pico (peak) Cristóbal Colón (18,947 ft [5,775 m] above sea

  • Santa Maura (Greece)

    Leucas: The chief town, Levkás, lies at the northeastern corner, which in antiquity was separated by a marshy isthmus. It was formerly called Amaxíkhi or Santa Maura; the latter is also the Venetian name for the island. Most of the population inhabit the wooded east coast and its valleys.

  • Santa Monica (California, United States)

    Santa Monica, city, Los Angeles county, southern California, U.S. Lying on Santa Monica Bay, it is surrounded by the city of Los Angeles. Santa Monica was laid out in 1875 by Senator John P. Jones and named for Las Lágrimas de Santa Monica (Spanish: “The Tears of St. Monica”), a local spring. The

  • Santa Monica Mountains (mountain range, California, United States)

    Santa Monica Mountains, mountain range in southern California, U.S., extending east-west for about 40 miles (64 km), paralleling the north shore of Santa Monica Bay. Elevations range from 1,000 to 3,000 feet (300 to 910 metres). Much of the range is within Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation

  • Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (national park, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Sports and recreation: …is the sprawling 239-square-mile (619-square-km) Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (1978), the largest such preserve in an American metropolis. Jointly managed by the U.S. National Park Service, the California Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, the area includes some existing homes but restricts permanent…

  • Santa Prisca (church, Rome, Italy)

    mystery religion: Painting: In the Mithraeum under Sta. Prisca in Rome, two layers of frescoes were found that show the procession of the initiates toward ritual sacrifice of a bull, called Suovetaurilia, and the sacred meal of the sun god and Mithra. Sometimes a fresco replaced the relief of the sacrifice of…

  • Santa Prisca y San Sebastián, Church of (church, Taxco, Mexico)

    Jerónimo de Balbás: …the gilded altar in the Church of Santa Prisca y San Sebastián in the mining town of Taxco, constructed in the 1750s, which epitomizes the Churrigueresque style. For this altar, Isidoro elaborated on his father’s style by having vegetal decoration cascade from the estípites, which also support tiny figures of…

  • Santa Rita Dur?o, José de (Brazilian poet)

    José de Santa Rita Dur?o, Brazilian epic poet, best known for his long poem Caramúru. Dur?o was a pioneer in his use of the South American Indians as subjects of literature. After an education at the Jesuit college in Rio de Janeiro, Dur?o obtained the degree of doctor of theology (1756) at the

  • Santa River (river, Peru)

    Santa River, river, west-central Peru, rising in the snowcapped Nevado de Tuco in the Andean Cordillera Blanca and flowing into Aguash and Conococha lakes. From the latter it emerges as the Santa River; it then flows northwest, descending from 14,000 to 7,000 ft (4,300 to 2,100 m) above sea level,

  • Santa Rosa (California, United States)

    Santa Rosa, city, seat (1854) of Sonoma county, western California, U.S. It is situated on Santa Rosa Creek, at the foot of the Sonoma Mountains, 50 miles (80 km) north-northwest of San Francisco. Founded in 1833 by Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo and named for St. Rose of Lima, it developed as a

  • Santa Rosa (New Mexico, United States)

    Guadalupe: …railroads at the town of Santa Rosa in the early 20th century and the building of U.S. Route 66 across the county in the 1930s stimulated development.

  • Santa Rosa (Argentina)

    Santa Rosa, city, capital of La Pampa provincia (province), central Argentina. It is located in the northeast-central part of the province in the heart of the Pampas region. Founded in 1892, the city developed as an agricultural centre processing grain (wheat) and cattle from the eastern part of

  • Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument (mountain area, California, United States)

    Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument, scenic and biologically diverse mountain area of far southern California, U.S. The monument encompasses the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto ranges, two short segments of the Pacific mountain system that extend south and southeastward from the San

  • Santa Rosa de Cabal (Colombia)

    Santa Rosa de Cabal, city, Risaralda department, west central Colombia, on the western slopes of the Andean Cordillera (mountains) Central. It is a commercial and manufacturing centre for the fertile agricultural and pastoral hinterland. Silkworms are raised in the vicinity, and there are silver,

  • Santa Rosa de Copán (Honduras)

    Santa Rosa de Copán, city, northwestern Honduras. It is located in the highlands at 3,806 feet (1,160 metres) above sea level, near the Alash Higuito River, a tributary of the Mejocote. Founded in the 18th century, it was called Los Llanos until 1812 and Los Llanos de Santa Rosa thereafter. In 1843

  • Santa Rosa Island (island, California, United States)

    Channel Islands: Santa Rosa Island is leased by its former owners for game hunting; the remains of Pleistocene pygmy mammoths have been excavated there. Santa Cruz Island has two rugged ranges (rising to Mount Diablo at 2,450 feet [747 metres] in the north), a central valley, and…

  • Santa Rosa Mountains (mountains, California, United States)

    Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument: The monument encompasses the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto ranges, two short segments of the Pacific mountain system that extend south and southeastward from the San Bernardino Mountains (the southernmost portion of the California Coast Ranges). The monument covers some 425 square miles (1,100 square km). Created a national…

  • Santa Sabina (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: The Aventine: The basilica of Santa Sabina, little altered since the 5th century, is lined with 24 magnificent matching Corinthian columns rescued out of Christian charity from an abandoned pagan temple or palace. The Parco Savello, a small public park, was the walled area of the Savello family fortress, one…

  • Santa Sangre (film by Jodorowsky [1989])

    Alejandro Jodorowsky: Later films, comic books, and psychomagic: In Santa Sangre (1989; Holy Blood), insane-asylum inmate Fenix (Jodorowsky’s son Axel) remembers his childhood growing up in the circus and the horrific event of his father’s cutting off his mother’s arms and then killing himself. Fenix escapes from the institution and reunites with his mother. However, under her…

  • Santa Scolastica (church, Subiaco, Italy)

    Western architecture: Italy: …II, built the monastery of Santa Scolastica, Subiaco (1774–77), with a barrel-vaulted nave characteristic of the new taste. In 1787 the first baseless Greek Doric columns in Italy appeared in the Chiesetta di Piazza di Siena in the gardens of the Villa Borghese, Rome, designed by Mario Asprucci, 20 years…

  • Santa Sindone (chapel, Turin, Italy)

    Guarino Guarini: In San Lorenzo (1668–87) and Santa Sindone (1667–90; “Holy Shroud”) in Turin, Guarini, working on a centralized plan, converted domes to an open lacework of interwoven masonry arches. (Santa Sindone was extensively damaged by fire in 1997, and the chapel was closed indefinitely for restoration work.) Although its design and…

  • Santa Sofia (church, Padua, Italy)

    Andrea Mantegna: Formative years in Padua: …altarpiece for the church of Santa Sofia (1448), now lost, demonstrates his precocity, since it was unusual for so young an artist to receive such a commission. Mantegna himself proudly called attention to his youthful ability in the painting’s inscription: “Andrea Mantegna from Padua, aged 17, painted this with his…

  • Santa Susanna (church, Rome, Italy)

    Western architecture: Origins and development in Rome: …facade of the church of Santa Susanna. Roman church facades in the late 16th century tended to be either precise, elegant, and papery thin or disjointed, equivocal, and awkwardly massive. Maderno’s Santa Susanna facade is an integrated design in which each element contributes to the central culminating feature. Precision and…

  • Santa Tecla (El Salvador)

    Nueva San Salvador, city, west-central El Salvador. Founded in 1854 as Nueva Ciudad de San Salvador at the southern base of San Salvador Volcano, it briefly became the national capital when San Salvador (7 miles [11 km] east) was devastated by an earthquake. In 1859 the seat of government was moved

  • Santa Trinità Madonna (work by Cimabue)

    Cimabue: …restoration has been completed; the Sta. Trinità Madonna, an altarpiece now in Florence’s Uffizi; and the Madonna Enthroned with St. Francis, in the lower church of S. Francesco at Assisi.

  • Santa Trinità, Ponte a (bridge, Florence, Italy)

    Bartolommeo Ammannati: …Florence are the Bridge of Santa Trinità (1567–69; destroyed 1944, rebuilt 1958), which contains elliptical arches, and the Fountain of Neptune (1567–70); the latter, in the Piazza della Signoria, features a colossal marble statue of that deity. In his old age Ammannati was strongly influenced by the Counter-Reformation philosophy of…

  • Santa Ursula y las Once Mil Virgenes (island territory, West Indies)

    United States Virgin Islands, organized unincorporated island territory of the United States, situated at the eastern end of the Greater Antilles, about 40 miles (64 km) east of Puerto Rico, in the northeastern Caribbean Sea. The territory is geographically part of the Virgin Islands group, which

  • Santa, Mount (mountain, Puerto Rico)

    La Plata River: …on the western slope of Mount Santa (2,963 feet [903 metres]), a peak of the Sierra de Cayey. Part of the stream is impounded by Lake Carite; the reservoir’s outlet diverts waters for a series of hydroelectric stations on the Guamaní River in the coastal Guayama area to the south.…

  • Santa-Clara (cape, Gabon)

    Santa-Clara, cape situated on the Atlantic coast of northwestern Gabon, Africa. Extending south from the larger peninsula that separates the Gabon estuary from Corisco Bay, the cape juts into the mouth of the estuary. Santa-Clara is located 12 miles (20 km) north of Libreville and just north of

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