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  • sarcolemma (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: Regulation of heartbeat: …on the surface of the sarcolemma, the membrane that surrounds the muscle fibre, support the flow of current as it relates to the flow of specific ions (ion-specific channels). These voltage-sensitive channels open and close as a function of the voltage that is sensed on the outer side and inner…

  • sarcoma (pathology)

    Sarcoma, tumour of connective tissue (tissue that is formed from mesodermal, or mesenchymal, cells). Sarcomas are distinguished from carcinomas, which are tumours of epithelial tissues. Sarcoma is relatively rare in adults but is one of the more common malignancies among children; it often spreads

  • sarcomere (physiology)

    cardiac muscle: …possesses contractile units known as sarcomeres; this feature, however, also distinguishes it from smooth muscle, the third muscle type. Cardiac muscle differs from skeletal muscle in that it exhibits rhythmic contractions and is not under voluntary control. The rhythmic contraction of cardiac muscle is regulated by the sinoatrial node of…

  • Sarcophaga kelly (insect)

    flesh fly: …of the best-known species (Sarcophaga kelly) is a grasshopper parasite. The female deposits larvae, or maggots, on the underside of a grasshopper’s wings. The maggots burrow into, and feed on, its internal organs, and when fully developed they exit the grasshopper and enter the pupal stage in the soil.…

  • Sarcophagidae (insect)

    Flesh fly, (family Sarcophagidae), any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera, that are similar in appearance to the house fly but are characterized by blackish stripes on the gray thorax (region behind the head) and a checkered pattern of light and dark gray on the abdomen. Most

  • sarcophagus (stone coffin)

    Sarcophagus, stone coffin. The original term is of doubtful meaning. Pliny explains that the word denotes a coffin of limestone from the Troad (the region around Troy) which had the property of dissolving the body quickly (Greek sarx, “flesh,” and phagein, “to eat”), but this explanation is

  • Sarcophilus harrisii (marsupial)

    Tasmanian devil, (Sarcophilus harrisii), stocky carnivorous marsupial with heavy forequarters, weak hindquarters, and a large squarish head. The Tasmanian devil is named for the Australian island-state of Tasmania, its only native habitat. Vaguely bearlike in appearance and weighing up to 12 kg (26

  • Sarcophilus laniarius (marsupial)

    Tasmanian devil, (Sarcophilus harrisii), stocky carnivorous marsupial with heavy forequarters, weak hindquarters, and a large squarish head. The Tasmanian devil is named for the Australian island-state of Tasmania, its only native habitat. Vaguely bearlike in appearance and weighing up to 12 kg (26

  • sarcoplasm (biology)

    sarcoplasmic reticulum: …concentration of calcium in the sarcoplasm (the cytoplasm of striated muscle cells), the sarcoplasmic reticulum plays an important role in determining whether muscle contraction occurs.

  • sarcoplasmic reticulum (cell biology)

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum, intracellular system of closed saclike membranes involved in the storage of intracellular calcium in striated (skeletal) muscle cells. Each segment of the sarcoplasmic reticulum forms a cufflike structure surrounding a myofibril, the fine contractile fibres that extend the

  • Sarcopterygii (fish taxon)

    vertebrate: Annotated classification: Subclass Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes) Usually possess a choana; paired fins with a fleshy base over a bony skeleton; persisting notochord; 2 dorsal fins; nares are internal. Class Amphibia Cold-blooded; respire by lungs, gills, skin, or mouth lining; larval stage in water or in egg; skin is…

  • Sarcoptes scabiei (arachnid)

    mange: …by varieties of the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, which also causes human scabies. Some form of mange is known in all domestic animals, although many varieties of mange mites infest only one species. They are transmitted between animals by direct contact and by objects that have been in contact with infested…

  • sarcoptic itch (dermatology)

    Scabies, skin inflammation accompanied by severe nighttime itching caused by the itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis). The mite passes from person to person by close contact. Scabies is characteristically a disease of wartime, for living standards then drop, washing may be difficult, and

  • Sarcoptidae (arachnid)

    mite: …grain and cheese mites (Acaridae), itch mites (Sarcoptidae) of humans and animals, scab mites (Psoroptidae), feather mites of birds, mites associated with insects, and many free-living forms. Grain mites (Glycyphagidae) not only damage stored products but also cause skin irritations in those who handle such products. Itch mites burrow into…

  • Sarcoramphus papa (bird)

    vulture: New World vultures: The king vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) is the most colourful vulture. The head and neck are red, yellow, and bluish; the eyes are white with red eye-rings; the body is buff above and white below; and the neck fringe is gray. Wingspan is about 2 metres; the…

  • sarcospinalis muscle (anatomy)

    Erector spinae, a deep muscle of the back; it arises from a tendon attached to the crest along the centre of the sacrum (the part of the backbone at the level of the pelvis, formed of five vertebrae fused together). When it reaches the level of the small of the back, the erector divides into three

  • Sarcosuchus (fossil reptile genus)

    crocodile: Size range and diversity of structure: forms (such as Deinosuchus and Sarcosuchus) may have been between 10 and 12 metres (33 and 40 feet) long. In comparison, the smallest species, the smooth-fronted caiman (Paleosuchus) and the dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis), reach about 1.7 metres (about 6 feet) in length as adults.

  • Sarcosuchus imperator (fossil reptile)

    Paul Sereno: …a remarkably complete specimen of Sarcosuchus imperator, the largest known crocodilian at approximately 12.2 metres (40 feet) long. Also of note was the discovery of several major Cretaceous carnivores, including Eocarchia dinops, a hunter, and Kryptops palaios, a scavenger. During this expedition, Sereno and his colleagues discovered a Neolithic human…

  • sarcotesta (plant anatomy)

    gymnosperm: General features: …coat is known as the sarcotesta and consists of two layers. The sarcotesta is often brightly coloured in cycads and the sarcotesta of Ginkgo seeds is foul-smelling when ripe. The seeds of some conifers have a thin winglike structure that may assist in the distribution of the seed. Others, such…

  • sard (mineral)

    Sard and sardonyx, translucent, light- to dark-brown varieties of the silica mineral chalcedony, historically two of the most widely used semiprecious stones. Sard and its close relative carnelian have been used in engraved jewelry for centuries. Sard (from Sardis, the ancient capital of Lydia)

  • Sarda (fish)

    Bonito, (genus Sarda), tunalike schooling fish of the tuna and mackerel family, Scombridae (order Perciformes). Bonitos are swift, predacious fishes found worldwide. They have striped backs and silvery bellies and grow to a length of about 75 cm (30 inches). Like tunas, they are streamlined, with a

  • Sarda australis (fish)

    bonito: … of the eastern Pacific, and S. australis of Australia and New Zealand.

  • Sarda Canal (canal, India)

    Sarda River: …is the source of the Sarda Canal (completed 1930), one of the longest irrigation canals in northern India.

  • Sarda chilensis (fish)

    bonito: orientalis of the Indo-Pacific, S. chilensis of the eastern Pacific, and S. australis of Australia and New Zealand.

  • Sarda chilensis chiliensis (fish subspecies)

    bonito: chilensis lineolata) and the Eastern Pacific bonito (S. chilensis chiliensis). The leaping bonito (Cybiosarda elegans) is a related Indo-Pacific food and sport fish. The oceanic bonito is the skipjack tuna (see tuna).

  • Sarda chilensis lineolata (fish subspecies)

    bonito: …two distinct geographic populations: the Pacific bonito (S. chilensis lineolata) and the Eastern Pacific bonito (S. chilensis chiliensis). The leaping bonito (Cybiosarda elegans) is a related Indo-Pacific food and sport fish. The oceanic bonito is the skipjack tuna (see tuna).

  • Sarda orientalis (fish)

    bonito: … of the Atlantic and Mediterranean, S. orientalis of the Indo-Pacific, S. chilensis of the eastern Pacific, and S. australis of Australia and New Zealand.

  • Sarda River (river, Asia)

    Sarda River, river of northern India and western Nepal. It rises as the Kali River in far northern Uttarakhand state in the Great Himalayas on the eastern slopes of the Nanda Devi massif. The river then flows generally south-southwest, where it constitutes the border between Uttarakhand state and

  • Sarda sarda (fish)

    bonito: sarda of the Atlantic and Mediterranean, S. orientalis of the Indo-Pacific, S. chilensis of the eastern Pacific, and S. australis of Australia and New Zealand.

  • sardana (dance)

    Sardana, communal dance intimately bound up with Catalan national consciousness. It is danced by men and women who join hands alternately in a closed circle. As they dance to the music of the sardana cobla (orchestra)—typically composed of one flabiol (a fipple flute that calls the dancers

  • Sardanapallus (legendary king of Assyria)

    Sardanapalus, legendary king of Assyria. He apparently represents an amalgamation of the characters and tragic fates of three Assyrian rulers: Ashurbanipal (q.v.; ruled 668–627 bc); his brother, Shamash-shum-ukin; and the last Assyrian king, Sin-shar-ishkun. According to the Greek historian

  • Sardanapalus (legendary king of Assyria)

    Sardanapalus, legendary king of Assyria. He apparently represents an amalgamation of the characters and tragic fates of three Assyrian rulers: Ashurbanipal (q.v.; ruled 668–627 bc); his brother, Shamash-shum-ukin; and the last Assyrian king, Sin-shar-ishkun. According to the Greek historian

  • sardar (Sikh leader)

    Sikhism: The 18th and 19th centuries: …the emergent misls and their sardars (chieftains) gradually established their authority over quite extensive areas.

  • Sardār Patel (Indian statesman)

    Vallabhbhai Patel, Indian barrister and statesman, one of the leaders of the Indian National Congress during the struggle for Indian independence. During the first three years of Indian independence after 1947, he served as deputy prime minister, minister of home affairs, minister of information,

  • Sardegna (island, Italy)

    Sardinia, island and regione (region) of Italy, second in size only to Sicily among the islands of the western Mediterranean. It lies 120 miles (200 km) west of the mainland of Italy, 7.5 miles (12 km) south of the neighbouring French island of Corsica, and 120 miles (200 km) north of the coast of

  • Sardes (Turkey)

    Sardis, ruined capital of ancient Lydia, about 50 miles (80 km) west of present ?zmir, Turkey. Strategically located on a spur at the foot of Mount Tmolus (Boz Da?), it commanded the central plain of the Hermus Valley and was the western terminus of the Persian royal road. Sardis was the capital of

  • Sardica, Council of (ancient ecclesiastical council)

    Council of Sardica, (342/343), an ecclesiastical council of the Christian Church held at Sardica, or Serdica (modern Sofia, Bulg.). It was convened by the joint emperors Constantius II (Eastern, sympathetic to the Arian party) and Constans I (Western, sympathetic to the Nicene party) to attempt a

  • Sardina pilchardus (fish)

    Pilchard, a species of sardine (q.v.) found in Europe. It is the local name in Great Britain and

  • sardine (fish)

    Sardine, any of certain food fishes of the herring family, Clupeidae, especially members of the genera Sardina, Sardinops, and Sardinella; the name sardine can also refer to the common herring (Clupea harengus) and to other small herrings or herringlike fishes when canned in oil. The European

  • Sardinella sagax melanosticta (fish)

    clupeiform: Migration: Japanese pilchards (Sardinella sagax melanosticta), for example, winter and spawn in the southern part of the Sea of Japan and on the Pacific side of the southern islands of Japan. In early summer they migrate to the northern end of the Tatar Strait and, in…

  • Sardines (novel by Farah)

    Nuruddin Farah: …trilogy—Sweet and Sour Milk (1979), Sardines (1981), and Close Sesame (1983)—about life under a particularly African dictatorship, in which ideological slogans barely disguise an almost surreal society and human ties have been severed by dread and terror.

  • sardines (game)

    hide-and-seek: …all the rest, as in sardines, where the hider is joined by seekers surreptitiously as they find him (the name of the game coming from the crowded condition of the hiding place). Hide-and-seek appears to be equivalent to the game apodidraskinda, described by the 2nd-century Greek writer Julius Pollux. In…

  • Sardinia (historical kingdom, Italy)

    Sardinia, kingdom of the house of Savoy from 1720, which was centred on the lands of Piedmont (in northwestern Italy) and Sardinia. In 1718, by the Treaty of London among the great powers, Victor Amadeus II, duke of Savoy and sovereign of Piedmont, was forced to yield Sicily to the Austrian

  • Sardinia (island, Italy)

    Sardinia, island and regione (region) of Italy, second in size only to Sicily among the islands of the western Mediterranean. It lies 120 miles (200 km) west of the mainland of Italy, 7.5 miles (12 km) south of the neighbouring French island of Corsica, and 120 miles (200 km) north of the coast of

  • Sardinia, Kingdom of (historical kingdom, Italy)

    Sardinia, kingdom of the house of Savoy from 1720, which was centred on the lands of Piedmont (in northwestern Italy) and Sardinia. In 1718, by the Treaty of London among the great powers, Victor Amadeus II, duke of Savoy and sovereign of Piedmont, was forced to yield Sicily to the Austrian

  • Sardinia-Piedmont (historical kingdom, Italy)

    Sardinia, kingdom of the house of Savoy from 1720, which was centred on the lands of Piedmont (in northwestern Italy) and Sardinia. In 1718, by the Treaty of London among the great powers, Victor Amadeus II, duke of Savoy and sovereign of Piedmont, was forced to yield Sicily to the Austrian

  • Sardinian language

    Sardinian language, Romance language spoken by the more than 1.5 million inhabitants of the central Mediterranean island of Sardinia. Of all the modern Romance languages (including French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish), Sardinian is the most similar to Vulgar (non-Classical) Latin,

  • Sardinian script (writing system)

    Phoenician alphabet: …Cypro-Phoenician (10th–2nd century bc) and Sardinian (c. 9th century bc) varieties. A third variety of the colonial Phoenician script evolved into the Punic and neo-Punic alphabets of Carthage, which continued to be written until about the 3rd century ad. Punic was a monumental script and neo-Punic a cursive form.

  • Sardi?ias-Montalbo, Sergio Eligio (Cuban boxer)

    Kid Chocolate, Cuban professional boxer, world junior lightweight (130 pounds) champion from 1931 to 1933. Kid Chocolate officially turned professional in 1927 after winning all 100 of his recorded amateur bouts in Cuba, 86 by knockout; however, some boxing historians question these numbers and

  • Sardinops sagax (fish)

    clupeiform: Food ecology: The Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax)—which inhabits vast areas on both sides of the North Pacific, the South Pacific coasts of South America and Australia, and the Indian Ocean coasts of Australia and Africa—is a good example of a widespread, highly migratory, and economically important species. (The…

  • sardion (mineral)

    Sard and sardonyx, translucent, light- to dark-brown varieties of the silica mineral chalcedony, historically two of the most widely used semiprecious stones. Sard and its close relative carnelian have been used in engraved jewelry for centuries. Sard (from Sardis, the ancient capital of Lydia)

  • Sardis (Turkey)

    Sardis, ruined capital of ancient Lydia, about 50 miles (80 km) west of present ?zmir, Turkey. Strategically located on a spur at the foot of Mount Tmolus (Boz Da?), it commanded the central plain of the Hermus Valley and was the western terminus of the Persian royal road. Sardis was the capital of

  • Sardis, Siege of (Turkish history [546 bce])

    Siege of Sardis, (546 bce). The defeat of King Croesus of Lydia by Persian ruler Cyrus II at Sardis was a major step forward in the rise of the Persian Empire. The victory was achieved against heavy odds through Cyrus’s calm resourcefulness, the discipline of his men, and a remarkable use of camels

  • Sardo

    Sardinian language, Romance language spoken by the more than 1.5 million inhabitants of the central Mediterranean island of Sardinia. Of all the modern Romance languages (including French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish), Sardinian is the most similar to Vulgar (non-Classical) Latin,

  • sardonyx (mineral)

    sard and sardonyx: sardonyx, translucent, light- to dark-brown varieties of the silica mineral chalcedony, historically two of the most widely used semiprecious stones. Sard and its close relative carnelian have been used in engraved jewelry for centuries. Sard (from Sardis, the ancient capital of Lydia) was originally called…

  • Sardou, Victorien (French dramatist)

    Victorien Sardou, playwright who, with émile Augier and Alexandre Dumas fils, dominated the French stage in the late 19th century and is still remembered as a craftsman of bourgeois drama of a type belittled by George Bernard Shaw as “Sardoodledom.” His work Les Pattes de mouche (1860; A Scrap of

  • sardsīr (region, Iran)

    Fārs: …plains and plateaus of the sardsīr (cold climate) region are other centres of cultivation, being watered by the Kūr and other rivers and springs. These plains form closed basins (with salty lakes) that merge into the interior deserts. Most ranges in the sardsīr and the transitional zone (elevation, 2,500–4,500 feet…

  • Sardu

    Sardinian language, Romance language spoken by the more than 1.5 million inhabitants of the central Mediterranean island of Sardinia. Of all the modern Romance languages (including French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish), Sardinian is the most similar to Vulgar (non-Classical) Latin,

  • sardula (Indian art motif)

    Vyala, popular motif in Indian art, consisting of a composite leonine creature with the head of a tiger, elephant, bird, or other animal, frequently shown in combat with humans or pouncing upon an elephant. Essentially a solar symbol, it represents—like the eagle seizing the serpent—the triumph of

  • Sarduri II (king of Urartu)

    Tiglath-pileser III: Military campaigns.: …next attacked the Urartian ruler Sarduri II and his neo-Hittite and Aramaean allies, whom he defeated in 743 bc. Advance westward was, however, barred by the capital of Arpad, which had to be besieged for three years—a technique now feasible to a standing army. The victory in 741 was far-reaching,…

  • Sarduy, Severo (Cuban writer)

    Severo Sarduy, novelist, poet, critic, and essayist, one of the most daring and brilliant writers of the 20th century. Born in a working-class family of Spanish, African, and Chinese heritage, Sarduy was the top student in his high school. He went to Havana in the mid-1950s to study medicine.

  • SAREB (financial institution, Spain)

    Spain: The Rajoy administration: …de la Reestructuración Bancaria (SAREB) became operational in November 2012 with the stated mission of managing and disposing of up to €90 billion (about $120 billion) of nonperforming real-estate loans over a period of 15 years. In the months following SAREB’s creation, Spain’s nationalized and partially nationalized banks transferred…

  • saree (article of clothing)

    Sari, principal outer garment of women of the Indian subcontinent, consisting of a piece of often brightly coloured, frequently embroidered, silk, cotton, or, in recent years, synthetic cloth five to seven yards long. It is worn wrapped around the body with the end left hanging or used over the

  • Sarego, Villa (house, Santa Sofia, Italy)

    Andrea Palladio: Visits to Rome and work in Vicenza: At the Villa Sarego (c. 1568–69) at Santa Sofia a similar inward-facing complex was also planned but not completed. This design differs from the normal villa in its two-story rusticated colonnade forming loggias to rooms arranged around three sides of a court. It is reminiscent of the…

  • Sarek National Park (national park, Norrbotten, Sweden)

    Sarek National Park, park in Norrbotten l?n (county), northwestern Sweden, encompassing most of the Sarek mountain range. It was established in 1909, with the setting aside of an area of 746 square miles (1,931 square km), and it adjoins two other national parks—Stora Sj?fallet on the north and

  • Sarek, Mount (mountain, Sweden)

    Sweden: Relief: …(2,111 metres) in elevation, and Mount Sarek (Sarektj?kk?), which rises 6,854 feet (2,089 metres), in the magnificent Sarek National Park.

  • Sarekat Islām (political party, Indonesia)

    Sarekat Islām, the first nationalist political party in Indonesia to gain wide popular support. Founded in 1912 the party originated as an association of those Muslim merchants who wanted to advance their economic interests in relation to Chinese merchants in Java, but the association became

  • Sarekat Islām Merah (political party, Indonesia)

    Sarekat Islām: …latter group set up the Sarekat Islām Merah (Red Islāmic Association), which later changed its name to the Sarekat Rakjat (People’s Association), to serve as the mass organization of the PKI. The split severely undermined the Sarekat Islām, which eventually declined into a secondary party.

  • Sarekat Rakjat (political party, Indonesia)

    Sarekat Islām: …latter group set up the Sarekat Islām Merah (Red Islāmic Association), which later changed its name to the Sarekat Rakjat (People’s Association), to serve as the mass organization of the PKI. The split severely undermined the Sarekat Islām, which eventually declined into a secondary party.

  • Sareks National Park (national park, Norrbotten, Sweden)

    Sarek National Park, park in Norrbotten l?n (county), northwestern Sweden, encompassing most of the Sarek mountain range. It was established in 1909, with the setting aside of an area of 746 square miles (1,931 square km), and it adjoins two other national parks—Stora Sj?fallet on the north and

  • Sarektj?kk? (mountain, Sweden)

    Sweden: Relief: …(2,111 metres) in elevation, and Mount Sarek (Sarektj?kk?), which rises 6,854 feet (2,089 metres), in the magnificent Sarek National Park.

  • Sarema (island, Estonia)

    Saaremaa, island, Estonia. It is the largest of the islands in the Muhu archipelago that divides the Baltic Sea from the Gulf of Riga. The island is low-lying and is composed largely of limestones and dolomites. Some of the places with poorer soils are characterized by the alvary—poor bushy

  • Saretsky, Judith Hannah (American psychologist)

    Judith S. Wallerstein, (Judith Hannah Saretsky), American psychologist (born Dec. 27, 1921, New York, N.Y.—died June 18, 2012, Piedmont, Calif.), studied divorce in American families and proclaimed what she considered its long-term negative consequences for children. In a landmark longitudinal

  • Sarett, Lewis Hastings (American chemist)

    Lewis Hastings Sarett, American organic chemist who, while serving as a research scientist (1942–48) at Merck & Co., Inc., synthesized cortisone, a feat that had wide-ranging applications in the treatment of allergies as well as inflammatory and neoplastic diseases; Sarett was the 1975 recipient of

  • Sarez, Lake (lake, Tajikistan)

    Tajikistan: Drainage and soils: Lake Sarez was formed in 1911 during an earthquake, when a colossal landslide dammed the Murgab River. The Zeravshan Range contains Iskanderkul, which, like most of the country’s lakes, is of glacial origin.

  • Sarfatti, Margherita (Italian critic)

    Novecento movement: …20th-century) movement were the critic Margherita Sarfatti and seven artists: Anselmo Bucci, Leonardo Dudreville, Achille Funi, Gian Emilio Malerba, Piero Marussig, Ubaldo Oppi, and Mario Sironi. Under Sarfatti’s leadership, the group sought to renew Italian art by rejecting European avant-garde movements and embracing Italy’s artistic traditions.

  • Sarg, Tony (American puppeteer)

    Bil and Cora Baird: …under the noted American puppeteer Tony Sarg. He traveled on the road giving puppet performances and in the mid-1930s began producing his own independent puppet shows. He married Cora Eisenberg, who had acted under the name of Cora Burlar, in 1937. In the following years, they made their own puppets,…

  • Sargasso Sea (area, North Atlantic Ocean)

    Sargasso Sea, area of the North Atlantic Ocean, elliptical in shape and relatively still, that is strewn with free-floating seaweed of the genus Sargassum. It lies between the parallels 20° N and 35° N and the meridians 30° W and 70° W inside a clockwise-setting ocean-current system, of which the

  • Sargassum (genus of brown algae)

    Sargassum, genus of about 150 species of brown algae (family Sargassaceae) generally attached to rocks along coasts in temperate regions or occurring as pelagic (free-floating) algae in the open sea. The Sargasso Sea in the western Atlantic Ocean, which is often characterized by floating masses of

  • sargassum fish (fish)

    frogfish: The sargassum fish (Histrio histrio) is patterned very much like the sargassum weed in which it lives.

  • Sargassum fluitans (brown algae)

    Sargassum: …masses of Sargassum natans and S. fluitans, is named for the seaweed. Massive quantities of Sargassum sometimes wash ashore in the Caribbean and can have a negative impact on beach tourism, though the rotting algae do not pose a human health risk. An Asian species, S. muticum, is considered invasive…

  • Sargassum muticum (brown algae)

    Sargassum: An Asian species, S. muticum, is considered invasive in many areas outside its native range.

  • Sargassum natans (brown algae)

    Sargassum: …characterized by floating masses of Sargassum natans and S. fluitans, is named for the seaweed. Massive quantities of Sargassum sometimes wash ashore in the Caribbean and can have a negative impact on beach tourism, though the rotting algae do not pose a human health risk. An Asian species, S. muticum,…

  • sargassum weed (brown algae)

    Sargassum: …characterized by floating masses of Sargassum natans and S. fluitans, is named for the seaweed. Massive quantities of Sargassum sometimes wash ashore in the Caribbean and can have a negative impact on beach tourism, though the rotting algae do not pose a human health risk. An Asian species, S. muticum,…

  • Sargeant, Winthrop (American music critic)

    Winthrop Sargeant, influential American music critic noted for his fine writing and conservative tastes. At age 18 Sargeant was the youngest player in the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and he went on to play with the New York Symphony (1926–28) and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra (1928–30)

  • sargenes (religious garment)

    religious dress: Later religious dress: …a kittel (also called a sargenes). This white garment, however, is worn not only by rabbis but also by other worshippers. The kittel emphasizes that Yom Kippur is an occasion not only of repentance but also of grace, for which festal wear is appropriate. Emphasis on the atoning aspect of…

  • Sargent Ice Field (ice field, Alaska, United States)

    Alaskan mountains: Physiography of the southern ranges: …heavily glaciated, resulting in the Sargent and Harding ice fields in the Kenai Mountains (on the Kenai Peninsula) and the Bagley Ice Field in the eastern Chugach Mountains. Numerous long and spectacular glaciers descend from the crests of those mountains. The St. Elias Mountains and the Kenai-Chugach mountain system have…

  • Sargent, Alvin (American author and screenwriter)
  • Sargent, Dudley Allen (American college administrator)

    physical culture: Athletic clubs and sports: …not just the athletically inclined, Dudley Allen Sargent virtually founded the discipline of physical education. Luther Gulick, a student of Sargent and a devotee of Muscular Christianity, infused a sport and fitness component into the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA), founded in 1844. As director of the YMCA Training School…

  • Sargent, James (American locksmith)

    lock: Development of modern types.: …combat this type of crime, James Sargent of Rochester, N.Y., in 1873 devised a lock based on a principle patented earlier in Scotland, incorporating a clock that permitted the safe to be opened only at a preset time.

  • Sargent, John Singer (American painter)

    John Singer Sargent, Italian-born American painter whose elegant portraits provide an enduring image of Edwardian Age society. The wealthy and privileged on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean came to his studio in London to be immortalized. Sargent was reared abroad and first saw the United States in

  • Sargent, Judith (American writer)

    Judith Sargent Stevens Murray, American writer during the early republic, remembered largely for her essays and journalistic comment on contemporary public issues, especially women’s rights. Judith Sargent was the daughter of a wealthy shipowner and merchant and received an unusually good education

  • Sargent, Sir Harold Malcolm Watts (British conductor)

    Sir Malcolm Sargent, English conductor who, as Britain’s self-styled “ambassador of music,” toured throughout the world. Sargent earned his diploma from the Royal College of Organists at 16 and in his early 20s became England’s youngest doctor of music. His debut came in 1921, when he conducted his

  • Sargent, Sir John Philip (British statesman)

    Sir John Philip Sargent, British statesman and educator who served as the principal educational adviser to the government of India from 1938 to 1948. Educated at St. Paul’s School and Oriel College, Oxford, Sargent was director of education for Southend-on-Sea (1927–31) and the county of Essex

  • Sargent, Sir Malcolm (British conductor)

    Sir Malcolm Sargent, English conductor who, as Britain’s self-styled “ambassador of music,” toured throughout the world. Sargent earned his diploma from the Royal College of Organists at 16 and in his early 20s became England’s youngest doctor of music. His debut came in 1921, when he conducted his

  • Sargent, Thomas J. (American economist)

    Thomas J. Sargent, American economist who, with Christopher A. Sims, was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize for Economics. He and Sims were honoured for their independent but complementary research on how changes in macroeconomic indicators such as gross domestic product (GDP), inflation, investment, and

  • Sargent, Thomas John (American economist)

    Thomas J. Sargent, American economist who, with Christopher A. Sims, was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize for Economics. He and Sims were honoured for their independent but complementary research on how changes in macroeconomic indicators such as gross domestic product (GDP), inflation, investment, and

  • Sargeson, Frank (New Zealand writer)

    Frank Sargeson, novelist and short-story writer whose ironic, stylistically diverse works made him the most widely known New Zealand literary figure of his day. Davey was born into a conservative Methodist family. His father was a businessman who eventually became the town clerk. Davey studied the

  • Sargocentron (fish)

    Squirrelfish, any of about 70 species of large-eyed, colourful, tropical reef fish of the family Holocentridae (order Beryciformes). Squirrelfish are edible fish found throughout the tropics. They have spiny fins and rough, prickly scales; some also have a sharp spine on each cheek. Most

  • Sargodha (Pakistan)

    Sargodha, city, Punjab province, Pakistan. The city is a grain and cash crop market connected by road with Lahore and Miānwāli and by rail with Faisalābād (formerly Lyallpur) and Lahore. Industries include textile, hosiery, flour, and oilseed mills, cotton gins, and chemical and soap factories.

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