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  • saviour (religious concept)

    Buddhism: Female deities: Tara, the female saviour, is a much more popular figure who has often been seen as the female counterpart of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. In China and Japan, Avalokiteshvara himself gradually assumed a female form. As Guanyin (Japanese: Kannon), Avalokiteshvara became probably the most popular figure in the entire…

  • Saviour Tower (tower, Moscow, Russia)

    Moscow: The Kremlin: …the most important towers, the Saviour (Spasskaya) Tower, leading to Red Square, was built in 1491 by Pietro Solario, who designed most of the main towers; its belfry was added in 1624–25. The chimes of its clock are broadcast by radio as a time signal to the whole country. Also…

  • Saviour, Church of the (church, Abramtsevo, Russia)

    Abramtsevo: …as the building of a small church (1881–82). Its design was conceived by Vasily Polenov and Viktor Vasnetsov and drew inspiration from the medieval Russian cities Novgorod, Pskov, and Suzdal. Its interior was adorned with icons created by Repin and Mikhail Nesterov, a ceramic tile stove by Vrubel, and a…

  • Savitri (Hindu goddess)

    Savitri, goddess in Hindu mythology, the daughter of the solar deity Savitr and the wife of the creator god Brahma. The Mahabharata recounts how Savitri used the power of her dedication to her husband Satyavan to prevent Yama, the god of the dead, from taking him when he was fated to die. She

  • Savitskaya, Svetlana Yevgenyevna (Soviet cosmonaut)

    Svetlana Yevgenyevna Savitskaya, Soviet cosmonaut who was the first woman to walk in space. The daughter of World War II fighter ace Yevgeny Savitsky, Savitskaya showed an aptitude for aviation at an early age. By her 22nd birthday, she had recorded over 400 parachute jumps and had claimed the top

  • Savitsky, Bella (American politician)

    Bella Abzug, U.S. congresswoman (1971–77) and lawyer who founded several liberal political organizations for women and was a prominent opponent of the Vietnam War and a supporter of equal rights for women. The daughter of Russian-Jewish émigrés, Bella Savitsky attended Hunter College (B.A., 1942)

  • savitu (Indian prayer)

    prayer: Religions of the East: …also an evening prayer, the savitu, more precisely a prayer for dusk, which the disciple of the Brahmans (priestly teachers) says at nightfall until the stars appear, and a benediction formula. The gestures of adoration (upasthana) in effect give more intensity to the prayer. The prayers that accompany sacrifices and…

  • Savo (Italy)

    Savona, city and seaport, Liguria region, northwestern Italy, on the Riviera di Ponente, southwest of Genoa. First recorded as the Gallo-Roman town of Savo, an ally of Carthage against Rome in 205 bc, it was next noted in ad 568–569, when the Ligurians were fighting the barbarians, and was

  • Savo (island, Solomon Islands)

    Savo, island in the eastern Solomon Islands, southwestern Pacific Ocean, just north of Guadalcanal. Rising to 1,673 feet (510 metres), the island is about 5 miles (8 km) long and 2 miles (3 km) wide. It has no good anchorages, but boat service is available from Guadalcanal. Its active volcano gives

  • Savo Island, Battle of (World War II)

    naval warfare: The age of the aircraft carrier: …in the cruiser–destroyer battles of Savo Island, Cape Esperance, Tassafaronga, Kula Gulf, and Kolombangara, Japanese night tactics prevailed. Not until mid-1943, with tactics attributed to Captain (later Admiral) Arleigh Burke that exploited the radar advantage in full, did the U.S. Navy redress the balance.

  • Savoe-zee (sea, Pacific Ocean)

    Savu Sea, portion of the Pacific Ocean surrounded by the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia. It is bounded by the volcanic inner Banda Island arc (Flores, Solor, Lomblen, Pantar, and Alor) on the north and by the nonvolcanic outer arc (Sumba, Roti, Sawu, and Timor) on the south. The Savu Sea is

  • Savoia (historical region, Europe)

    Savoy, historical and cultural region encompassing the Haute-Savoie and Savoie départements, Rh?ne-Alpes région, southeastern France. It is coextensive with the historic region of Savoy. The early inhabitants of the area were the Allobroges, members of a Celtic tribe who fiercely resisted Roman

  • Savoia (European dynasty)

    House of Savoy, historic dynasty of Europe, the ruling house of Italy from 1861 to 1946. During the European Middle Ages the family acquired considerable territory in the western Alps where France, Italy, and Switzerland now converge. In the 15th century, the house was raised to ducal status within

  • Savoie (European dynasty)

    House of Savoy, historic dynasty of Europe, the ruling house of Italy from 1861 to 1946. During the European Middle Ages the family acquired considerable territory in the western Alps where France, Italy, and Switzerland now converge. In the 15th century, the house was raised to ducal status within

  • Savoie (department, France)

    Rh?ne-Alpes: Ain, Haute-Savoie, Savoie, Isère, Dr?me, and Ardèche. In 2016 the Rh?ne-Alpes région was joined with the région of Auvergne to form the new administrative entity of Auvergne-Rh?ne-Alpes.

  • Savoie (historical region, Europe)

    Savoy, historical and cultural region encompassing the Haute-Savoie and Savoie départements, Rh?ne-Alpes région, southeastern France. It is coextensive with the historic region of Savoy. The early inhabitants of the area were the Allobroges, members of a Celtic tribe who fiercely resisted Roman

  • Savoie, Alpes de (mountains, France)

    Savoy Alps, northwestern spurs of the Graian Alps (q.v.) in southeastern France between Lake Geneva (north), the middle Rh?ne River (west), and the Arc and Isère river valleys (south). The highest peak is Pointe de la Grande Casse (12,631 feet [3,850 m]), a part of the Massif de la Vanoise and

  • Savoie, Charles-Emmanuel de, duc de Nemours, prince de Genevois (French duke)

    Charles-Emmanuel de Savoie, duke de Nemours, eldest son of the former duke, Jacques de Savoie. A supporter of the Holy League sponsored by the Roman Catholic Guises, he was appointed governor of Lyonnais just before he was arrested at Blois in King Henry III’s coup against the Guises (1588), when

  • Savoie, Charles-Emmanuel, duc de (duke of Savoy)

    Charles Emmanuel I, duke of Savoy who alternated alliances with France and Spain, taking advantage of the European power struggle in order to further his expansionist policy. A skilled soldier and shrewd politician, he was a capable ruler of Savoy, governing with moderation, promoting commercial d

  • Savoie, Jacques de, duc de Nemours, comte de Genevois, marquis de Saint-Sorlin (French duke)

    Jacques de Savoie, duke de Nemours, noted soldier and courtier during the French wars of religion. He won a military reputation in the French royal service on the eastern frontier and in Piedmont in the 1550s and against the Huguenots and their German allies in the 1560s. His amorous exploits at

  • Savojbolāgh (Iran)

    Mahābād, city, northwestern Iran. The city lies south of Lake Urmia in a fertile, narrow valley at an elevation of 4,272 feet (1,302 metres). There are a number of unexcavated tells, or mounds, on the plain of Mahābād in this part of the Azerbaijan region. The region was the centre of the

  • Savoldo, Giovanni Girolamo (Italian painter)

    Giovanni Girolamo Savoldo, painter of the Brescian school whose style is marked by a quiet lyricism. Although his work was largely forgotten after his death, interest in Savoldo was revived in the 20th century and his work gained a place alongside that of other High Renaissance painters. The first

  • Savón Fabré, Felix (Cuban boxer)

    Felix Savón , Cuban heavyweight boxer, who became the second fighter to win three Olympic gold medals in the same weight class and the first to capture six world amateur boxing titles. Savón, an imposing contender 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 metres) tall, rose to prominence in 1985 when he captured the

  • Savón, Felix (Cuban boxer)

    Felix Savón , Cuban heavyweight boxer, who became the second fighter to win three Olympic gold medals in the same weight class and the first to capture six world amateur boxing titles. Savón, an imposing contender 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 metres) tall, rose to prominence in 1985 when he captured the

  • Savona (Italy)

    Savona, city and seaport, Liguria region, northwestern Italy, on the Riviera di Ponente, southwest of Genoa. First recorded as the Gallo-Roman town of Savo, an ally of Carthage against Rome in 205 bc, it was next noted in ad 568–569, when the Ligurians were fighting the barbarians, and was

  • Savona faience (pottery)

    Savona faience, tin-glazed earthenware made in the 17th and 18th centuries at Savona, Liguria, Italy, and at nearby Genoa and Albissola. It is painted in a highly individual and seemingly artless style. Most 17th-century specimens are decorated in blue on a white ground; the painting of

  • Savonarola (work by Lenau)

    Nikolaus Lenau: …Poems”) and the religious epics Savonarola (1837) and Die Albigenser (1842; “The Albigensians”), deal with his relentless and unsuccessful search for order and constancy in love, nature, and faith. Following Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s death in 1832, the appearance in 1833 of the second part of his Faust inspired many…

  • Savonarola chair

    Scissors chair, chair supported by two crossed and curved supports either at the sides or at the back and front. Because of its basic simplicity, it is one of the oldest forms of chair or stool, with examples reaching back to the 2nd millennium bc. The seat, which was originally made of leather or

  • Savonarola, Girolamo (Italian preacher)

    Girolamo Savonarola, Italian Christian preacher, reformer, and martyr, renowned for his clash with tyrannical rulers and a corrupt clergy. After the overthrow of the Medici in 1494, Savonarola was the sole leader of Florence, setting up a democratic republic. His chief enemies were the Duke of

  • Savonius rotor (technology)

    turbine: Vertical-axis machines: Known as the Savonius rotor, it consists of semicircular blades that can be constructed from little more than the two sections of an oil drum, cut in half along its vertical axis and welded together with an offset from the axis to form an open S. An advanced…

  • Savonnerie carpet

    Savonnerie carpet, French pile floor covering, usually large, whether made at the Savonnerie workshop or made in that manner and style. The Savonnerie factory (on the site of a former soap factory, hence the name) was established in Paris in 1627 at the Hospice de la Savonnerie at Chaillot by royal

  • savora (Jewish scholar)

    Savora, any of a group of 6th-century-ad Jewish scholars who determined the final internal form of the Babylonian Talmud (Talmud Bavli), a collection of authoritative interpretations and explanations of Jewish oral laws and religious customs. Some experts feel that certain (perhaps many) of the

  • savora?im (Jewish scholar)

    Savora, any of a group of 6th-century-ad Jewish scholars who determined the final internal form of the Babylonian Talmud (Talmud Bavli), a collection of authoritative interpretations and explanations of Jewish oral laws and religious customs. Some experts feel that certain (perhaps many) of the

  • savory (plant)

    Savory, (genus Satureja), genus of about 30 species of aromatic herbs of the mint family (Lamiaceae). Savory is native to Eurasia and North Africa and is cultivated in many climates, particularly in France and Spain. The dried leaves and flowering tops of several species are used to flavour many

  • Savot, Louis (French architect)

    fireplace: …hearth was abandoned—until 1624, when Louis Savot, an architect employed in construction in the Louvre, Paris, developed a fireplace in which air was drawn through passages under the hearth and behind the fire grate and discharged into the room through a grill in the mantel. This approach was adapted in…

  • Savoy (historical region, Europe)

    Savoy, historical and cultural region encompassing the Haute-Savoie and Savoie départements, Rh?ne-Alpes région, southeastern France. It is coextensive with the historic region of Savoy. The early inhabitants of the area were the Allobroges, members of a Celtic tribe who fiercely resisted Roman

  • Savoy Alps (mountains, France)

    Savoy Alps, northwestern spurs of the Graian Alps (q.v.) in southeastern France between Lake Geneva (north), the middle Rh?ne River (west), and the Arc and Isère river valleys (south). The highest peak is Pointe de la Grande Casse (12,631 feet [3,850 m]), a part of the Massif de la Vanoise and

  • Savoy Big Five (American basketball team)

    Harlem Globetrotters, predominantly black professional U.S. basketball team that plays exhibition games all over the world, drawing crowds as large as 75,000 to see the players’ spectacular ball handling and humorous antics. The team was organized in Chicago in 1926 as the all-black Savoy Big Five.

  • Savoy Conference (English history)

    Savoy Conference, meeting held in 1661 at the Savoy Palace, London, attended by 12 Anglican bishops and 12 Puritan ministers, with nine assistants from each side, in order to decide on revisions for The Book of Common Prayer; as a result of the conference, the majority of Puritans defected from

  • Savoy Declaration (English Protestant history)

    Savoy Declaration, statement of faith prepared in 1658 by a conference of English Congregationalists who met at Savoy Palace, London. The declaration consisted of three parts: a preface, a confession of faith, and a platform of discipline. In matters of doctrine it was primarily a restatement

  • Savoy House (Poissy, France)

    International Style: …the International Style is the Villa Savoye (Poissy, France; 1929–31).

  • Savoy Theatre (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    Richard D'Oyly Carte: In 1881 Carte founded the Savoy Theatre, home of the immensely popular Gilbert and Sullivan productions and London’s first theatre to use electric lighting. In an attempt to establish serious opera, Carte built the Royal English Opera House (1887; now the Palace Theatre), for which Sullivan wrote Ivanhoe (1891). Despite…

  • Savoy, Douglas Eugene (American explorer and religious leader)

    Gene Savoy, American explorer and amateur archaeologist who discovered and explored more than 40 Inca and pre-Inca cities in Peru. Deeply interested in religious topics, Savoy also was the founder of a theology that he named Cosolargy. At age 17 Savoy enlisted in the U.S. Navy. After World War II

  • Savoy, Gene (American explorer and religious leader)

    Gene Savoy, American explorer and amateur archaeologist who discovered and explored more than 40 Inca and pre-Inca cities in Peru. Deeply interested in religious topics, Savoy also was the founder of a theology that he named Cosolargy. At age 17 Savoy enlisted in the U.S. Navy. After World War II

  • Savoy, House of (European dynasty)

    House of Savoy, historic dynasty of Europe, the ruling house of Italy from 1861 to 1946. During the European Middle Ages the family acquired considerable territory in the western Alps where France, Italy, and Switzerland now converge. In the 15th century, the house was raised to ducal status within

  • Savrasov, Aleksey Kondratyevich (Russian artist)

    Aleksey Kondratyevich Savrasov, Russian artist who was the founder of Russian lyrical landscape painting and the painter of such popular Russian paintings as The Rooks Have Returned (1871). Savrasov studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture from 1844 to 1854. His early

  • Savu Islands (island group, Indonesia)

    Sawu Islands, island group in the Savu Sea, East Nusa Tenggara (Nusa Tenggara Timur) provinsi (or propinsi; province), Indonesia. The island group includes Sabu (160 square miles [414 square km]), Raijua (14 square miles [36 square km]), and several islets located about 100 miles (160 km) west of

  • Savu Sea (sea, Pacific Ocean)

    Savu Sea, portion of the Pacific Ocean surrounded by the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia. It is bounded by the volcanic inner Banda Island arc (Flores, Solor, Lomblen, Pantar, and Alor) on the north and by the nonvolcanic outer arc (Sumba, Roti, Sawu, and Timor) on the south. The Savu Sea is

  • Savuka (South African music group)

    South Africa: Music: …the mixed-race bands Juluka and Savuka, both of which had international followings. Township music, a lively form of music that flourished in the townships during the apartheid era, has also been popular within the country and abroad.

  • Savusavu (town, Vanua Levu Island, Fiji)

    Vanua Levu Island: …administrative centre and commercial port; Savusavu, on the southeast coast, is the official port of entry. There are airports in both towns and several other airstrips around the island. Vanua Levu exports sugar, rice, citrus fruits, and copra. Copper ore was mined at Udu (Undu) Point in the northeast until…

  • Savvino Storozhevskiy Monastery (monastery, Russia)

    Zvenigorod: …prince, Yuri Zvenigorodsky, founded the Savvino Storozhevskiy Monastery at the confluence of the Storozhka and Moscow rivers, 0.6 mile (1 km) from Zvenigorod. Peter I (the Great), his brother Ivan V, and his sister Sophia found refuge in the monastery during the 1682 rebellion of the streltsy, the Russian military…

  • SAW (weapon)

    machine gun: The light machine gun, also called the squad automatic weapon, is equipped with a bipod and is operated by one soldier; it usually has a box-type magazine and is chambered for the small-calibre, intermediate-power ammunition fired by the assault rifles of its military unit. The medium…

  • saw (tool)

    Saw, tool for cutting solid materials to prescribed lengths or shapes. Most saws take the form of a thin metal strip with teeth on one edge or a thin metal disk with teeth on the periphery. Usually the teeth are “set” (bent) to alternate sides so that the kerf (groove) cut by the saw is wider than

  • saw grass (plant)

    Everglades: Natural environment: …of it is covered with saw grass (a sedge, the edges of which are covered with minute sharp teeth), which grows to a height of 4 to 10 feet (1.2 to 3 metres). Open water is sometimes found. Slight changes in the elevation of the land and the water’s salt…

  • Saw Maung (prime minister of Myanmar)

    Saw Maung, Burmese general and politician who led the junta that took over the Burmese government in a bloody coup in 1988; he served as head of the repressive regime until 1992 (b. December 1928--d. July 24, 1

  • saw palmetto (plant)

    Saw palmetto, Any of several shrubby palms chiefly of the southern U.S. and West Indies that have spiny-toothed petioles (leafstalks), especially a common palm (Serenoa repens) of the southeastern U.S., with a usually creeping stem. Saw palmettos make up part of the vegetation found in the Florida

  • saw shark (fish)

    Saw shark, (order Pristiophoriformes), any of about nine species of long-snouted marine sharks belonging to the order Pristiophoriformes. Saw sharks are found in tropical and temperate marine waters of the western Atlantic Ocean near Florida and the Bahamas, the Indian Ocean near India and

  • Saw, U (Myanmar political leader)

    U Saw, Burmese political leader who conspired in the assassination of Aung San, the resistance leader who negotiated Burma’s independence from the British. Unlike most other Burmese politicians, U Saw was not university-educated. He held a license to plead some types of legal cases, however, and

  • saw-scaled viper (snake)

    Saw-scaled viper, (genus Echis), any of eight species of small venomous snakes (family Viperidae) that inhabit arid regions and dry savannas north of the Equator across Africa, Arabia, and southwestern Asia to India and Sri Lanka. They are characterized by a stout body with a pear-shaped head that

  • Sawa Homare (Japanese football player)

    Sawa Homare, Japanese football (soccer) player who led Japan to victory in the 2011 Women’s World Cup. Sawa’s brother taught her the basics of football. By the time she was 12, she was playing in Japan’s first division, and at 15 she had an immediate impact on the national team, scoring four goals

  • Sawa, Jan (Polish author)

    Maria Konopnicka, author of short stories and one of the representative Positivist poets in Polish literature. (The Positivists espoused a system of philosophy emphasizing in particular the achievements of science.) Konopnicka, a lawyer’s daughter, rebelled against her landowner husband, who was

  • Sawaguchi Kazuyuki (Japanese mathematician)

    East Asian mathematics: The elaboration of Chinese methods: Sawaguchi Kazuyuki’s Kokon sanpoki (1671; “Ancient and Modern Mathematics”) pointed out that “erroneous” problems could have more than one solution (in other words, equations could have more than one root), but he left unanswered difficult problems involving simultaneous equations of the nth degree. Equations for…

  • Sawai Madhopur (India)

    Sawai Madhopur, city, eastern Rajasthan state, northwestern India. It lies on an upland plain just west of region of low ridges, about 25 miles (40 km) northwest of the junction of the Banas and Chambal rivers. The old walled town was laid out on a plan somewhat similar to that of Jaipur city by

  • Sawaki Kin’ichi (Japanese poet)

    Kin’ichi Sawaki, Japanese haiku poet (born Oct. 6, 1919, Toyama, Japan—died Nov. 5, 2001, Tokyo, Japan), was one of the preeminent Japanese haijin during the second half of the 20th century; he served as president of the Haiku Poets Association from 1987 to 1993. Sawaki founded Kaze (“Wind”), an i

  • Sawākin (Sudan)

    Sawākin, town, northeastern Sudan. It lies on the Red Sea coast 36 miles (58 km) south of Port Sudan. The town originated in the 12th century as a rival port to ?Aydhāb (Aidhab) to the north, where dues were levied on trade. It grew in importance after ?Aydhāb’s destruction (about 1428) to become

  • Sawalha, Julia (British actress)

    Absolutely Fabulous: Saffron (Julia Sawalha), Eddy’s straitlaced, virtuous teenage daughter, acts as a mother to her mother and serves as the moral centre and conscience of the show. June Monsoon, Eddy’s mother (June Whitfield), is an eccentric kleptomaniac whom Eddy apparently despises and constantly insults. The main cast…

  • Sawallisch, Wolfgang (German conductor and pianist)

    Wolfgang Sawallisch, German conductor and pianist (born Aug. 26, 1923, Munich, Ger.—died Feb. 22, 2013, Grassau, Ger.), conducted more than 1,100 performances during his two decades (1971–92) as music director of the Bavarian State Opera. (He was particularly noted for his interpretations of the

  • Sawankhalok (Thailand)

    Sawankhalok, town, north-central Thailand, on the Yom River north of Sukhothai town. A few miles north of the present town are the remains of the ancient walled city of Sawankhalok. The old town was renowned for pottery manufacture. Pop. (2000 est.)

  • Sawara (Japan)

    Sawara, former city, Chiba ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan, on the lower Tone River. In 2006 it merged with a number of nearby communities to form the new city of Katori. From the 17th to the early 20th century, Sawara was a commercial centre and river port whose importance was enhanced by the

  • Sawatch Range (mountains, Colorado, United States)

    Sawatch Range, segment of the southern Rocky Mountains in central Colorado, U.S., extending southeastward for 100 miles (160 km) from the Eagle River to the city of Saguache (a variant spelling of Sawatch). Bounded by the Arkansas River (east) and the Elk Mountains (west), its middle portion is

  • sawbelly (fish)

    Alewife, (Pomolobus, or Alosa, pseudoharengus), important North American food fish of the herring family, Clupeidae. Deeper-bodied than the true herring, the alewife has a pronounced saw-edge on the underside; it grows to about 30 cm (1 foot). Except for members of a few lake populations, it spends

  • sawbill (bird)

    Merganser, any of several species of Mergus, long-bodied, more or less crested diving ducks; though essentially freshwater birds, they are classified with scoters and goldeneyes in the sea duck tribe, Mergini (family Anatidae, order Anseriformes). They are called trash ducks because their flesh is

  • Sawbridge, Catharine (British historian)

    Catharine Macaulay, British historian and radical political writer. She was privately educated, and her readings in Greek and Roman history inculcated in her an enthusiasm for libertarian and republican ideals. Following her marriage to the Scottish physician George Macaulay in 1760, she began her

  • Sawchuk, Terrence Gordon (Canadian hockey player)

    Terry Sawchuk, professional North American ice hockey goalie. After playing two seasons in the U.S. Hockey League (1947–48) and the American Hockey League (1948–49), Sawchuk began his National Hockey League (NHL) career with the Detroit Red Wings in 1949. With them during his first stay, his

  • Sawchuk, Terry (Canadian hockey player)

    Terry Sawchuk, professional North American ice hockey goalie. After playing two seasons in the U.S. Hockey League (1947–48) and the American Hockey League (1948–49), Sawchuk began his National Hockey League (NHL) career with the Detroit Red Wings in 1949. With them during his first stay, his

  • Sawdā?, Qurnat al- (mountain, Lebanon)

    Qurnat al-Sawdā?, peak situated within the Lebanon Mountains in northern Lebanon, 45 miles (72 km) northeast of Beirut. At 10,131 feet (3,088 metres), it is the highest peak in

  • Sawdā?, Qurnat as- (mountain, Lebanon)

    Qurnat al-Sawdā?, peak situated within the Lebanon Mountains in northern Lebanon, 45 miles (72 km) northeast of Beirut. At 10,131 feet (3,088 metres), it is the highest peak in

  • sawdust (wood pulp)

    papermaking: Wood: …the wood-using industries, such as sawdust, has increasingly been used for pulp. In addition, more abundant and less desirable hardwoods have been used as a source of pulp. The woodyard of a pulp mill formerly stored pulpwood in the form of roundwood logs, but recently there has been a trend…

  • Sawdust War (United States [1872])

    Williamsport: The “Sawdust War” erupted (1872) as workers sought a shorter work day (they eventually won a 10-hour day). The militia put it down. As the timber supply diminished, the economy diversified, eventually including metal and leather products, furniture, processed foods, and textiles.

  • Sawel (mountain, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Northern Ireland: Relief: …the more rounded Sperrin Mountains; Sawel, at 2,224 feet (678 metres), is the highest of several hills over 2,000 feet (610 metres). The far southwest, the historic County Fermanagh, is focused geographically on the basin of Lough Erne, in a drumlin-strewn area ringed by hills more than 1,000 feet (300…

  • sawfish (fish)

    Sawfish, (family Pristidae), any of five species of sharklike rays forming the genera Pristis and Anoxypristis in the family Pristidae. Sawfishes are found in shallow water in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. They are bottom dwellers, frequenting bays and estuaries and sometimes

  • sawfly (insect)

    Sawfly, (superfamily Tenthredinoidea), any of a large group of widely distributed insects that are thought to be the most primitive group within the order Hymenoptera. Adults are wasplike in appearance, although they do not have a constricted “waist” between the thorax and abdomen. Larvae are

  • Sawhāj (Egypt)

    Sūhāj, town and capital of Sūhāj mu?āfa?ah (governorate) in the Nile River valley of Upper Egypt. The town is located on the Nile’s western bank between Asyū? and Jirjā, immediately across from Akhmīm on the eastern bank. It has cotton-ginning, textile-weaving, and food-processing factories.

  • Sawhāj (governorate, Egypt)

    Sūhāj, mu?āfa?ah (governorate) in Upper Egypt, south of Asyū? and north of Qinā governorates. It is a ribbonlike stretch of the fertile Nile River valley about 60 miles (100 km) long. Through it the Nile flows in a roughly 13-mile- (21-km-) wide flat-bottomed valley hemmed in by limestone cliffs

  • sawhorse (carpentry)

    hand tool: Workbench and vise: …be sawed and specialized benches—horses—on which the leatherworker or coppersmith sat while facing a raised workpiece. A small workpiece was often held by a strap that was tightened when the craftsperson placed a foot in a loop that formed the free end and dangled beneath the table. Such horses…

  • sawing (tool)

    Saw, tool for cutting solid materials to prescribed lengths or shapes. Most saws take the form of a thin metal strip with teeth on one edge or a thin metal disk with teeth on the periphery. Usually the teeth are “set” (bent) to alternate sides so that the kerf (groove) cut by the saw is wider than

  • sawing machine (tool)

    Sawing machine, device for cutting up bars of material or for cutting out shapes in plates of raw material. The cutting tools of sawing machines may be thin metallic disks with teeth on their edges, thin metal blades or flexible bands with teeth on one edge, or thin grinding wheels. The tools may

  • ?awm (Islam)

    ?awm, (Arabic: “fasting”) in Islam, any religious fast, but especially the fast of the month of Ramadan during which Muslims abstain from food or drink each day from sunrise (fajr) until sunset (maghrib). The purpose of the fast is to practice self-restraint, piety, and generosity. ?awm is one of

  • sawmill (machine or plant)

    Sawmill, machine or plant with power-driven machines for sawing logs into rough-squared sections or into planks and boards. A sawmill may be equipped with planing, molding, tenoning, and other machines for finishing processes. The biggest mills are usually situated where timber can be brought by

  • sawn wood (technology)

    wood: Sawn wood: Lumber is the main sawn wood product. Lumber of large dimensions—more than about 10 cm (4 inches) in width and thickness—and suitable for heavy constructions is called timber. This loose term, however, is also applied to wood of a forest stand and to…

  • Sawoe Islands (island group, Indonesia)

    Sawu Islands, island group in the Savu Sea, East Nusa Tenggara (Nusa Tenggara Timur) provinsi (or propinsi; province), Indonesia. The island group includes Sabu (160 square miles [414 square km]), Raijua (14 square miles [36 square km]), and several islets located about 100 miles (160 km) west of

  • Sawos (people)

    Oceanic art and architecture: The Sepik River regions: The Sawos and the river-dwelling Iatmul, who historically derive from the Sawos, worked in styles totally different from those of the people to the north. Their ceremonial houses were long rectangular structures, with upper stories elevated on posts often carved with ancestral faces and figures. The…

  • sawshark (fish)

    Saw shark, (order Pristiophoriformes), any of about nine species of long-snouted marine sharks belonging to the order Pristiophoriformes. Saw sharks are found in tropical and temperate marine waters of the western Atlantic Ocean near Florida and the Bahamas, the Indian Ocean near India and

  • sawtooth oak (plant)

    oak: acuta), and sawtooth oak (Q. acutissima). The English oak, a timber tree native to Eurasia and northern Africa, is cultivated in other areas of the world as an ornamental.

  • Sawtooth Range (mountains, Idaho, United States)

    Boise National Forest: …generally steep and mountainous, the Sawtooth Range constituting much of the area; elevation decreases somewhat toward the Boise River valley in the southwest. The highest point within the forest is Big Baldy, 9,722 feet (2,963 metres) above sea level. The Middle Fork Salmon and South Fork Salmon rivers, the Middle…

  • sawtooth snipe eel (fish)

    eel: Annotated classification: Family Serrivomeridae (sawtooth snipe eels) Jaws moderately extended; bladelike teeth on vomer bones. 2 genera with about 10 species. Bathypelagic, worldwide. Family Colocongridae (shorttail eels) 1 genus, Coloconger, with about 5 species. Marine; Atlantic, Indian and western Pacific oceans. Family

  • sawtooth wave (physics)

    sound: The Fourier theorem: …components is illustrated by the sawtooth wave in Figure 9. The wave to be synthesized is shown by the graph at the upper middle, with its fundamental to the left and right. Adding the second through fourth harmonics, as shown on the left below the fundamental, results in the sawtooth…

  • Sawu Islands (island group, Indonesia)

    Sawu Islands, island group in the Savu Sea, East Nusa Tenggara (Nusa Tenggara Timur) provinsi (or propinsi; province), Indonesia. The island group includes Sabu (160 square miles [414 square km]), Raijua (14 square miles [36 square km]), and several islets located about 100 miles (160 km) west of

  • Sawu, Laut (sea, Pacific Ocean)

    Savu Sea, portion of the Pacific Ocean surrounded by the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia. It is bounded by the volcanic inner Banda Island arc (Flores, Solor, Lomblen, Pantar, and Alor) on the north and by the nonvolcanic outer arc (Sumba, Roti, Sawu, and Timor) on the south. The Savu Sea is

  • ?awwān, Tall (archaeological site, Iraq)

    history of Mesopotamia: The emergence of Mesopotamian civilization: …Mesopotamia: ?assūna, near Mosul, and Tall ?awwān, near Sāmarrā?. At ?assūna the pottery is more advanced, with incised and painted designs, but the decoration is still unsophisticated. One of the buildings found may be a shrine, judging from its unusual ground plan. Apart from emmer there occurs, as the result…

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