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  • Scabiosa (plant)

    Scabious, (genus Scabiosa), genus of about 30 species of annual and perennial herbs of the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). They are native to temperate Eurasia, the Mediterranean region, and the mountains of eastern Africa. Some are important garden plants. All species have basal leaf rosettes

  • Scabiosa atropurpurea (plant, Scabiosa atropurpurea)

    scabious: Major species: Pincushion flower, also called sweet scabious, mourning bride, or garden scabious (Scabiosa atropurpurea), a southern European annual with deeply cut basal leaves and feathery stem leaves, produces fragrant 5-cm (2-inch) flower heads in white, rose, crimson, blue, or deep mahogany purple. It is about 1…

  • Scabiosa caucasica (plant)

    scabious: Major species: Perennial scabious (S. caucasica), of southeastern Europe, grows to 75 cm (29.5 inches). It has narrow smooth-margined basal leaves and cut stem leaves and produces light blue flowers up to 8 cm (3 inches) across.

  • Scabiosa columbaria (plant)

    scabious: Major species: Small scabious (S. columbaria; also known as dwarf pincushion flower), from Eurasia and Africa, reaches 60 cm (24 inches). It is a perennial with toothed elongate oval basal leaves and cut stem leaves. The light blue flowers are 3.5 cm (about 1.5 inches) across.

  • scabious (plant)

    Scabious, (genus Scabiosa), genus of about 30 species of annual and perennial herbs of the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). They are native to temperate Eurasia, the Mediterranean region, and the mountains of eastern Africa. Some are important garden plants. All species have basal leaf rosettes

  • scad (fish)

    Scad, any of several species of fishes in the family Carangidae (order Perciformes), which also includes the jacks, amberjacks, and pompanos. The name scad is usually restricted to certain species in the genera Decapterus, Selar, and Trachurus. The half dozen species are marine and occur along the

  • SCADA (technology)

    malware: By attacking these supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, Stuxnet was able to cause industrial processes to behave in a manner inconsistent with their original programming, thus crossing the line between cyberspace and the “real world.” While Stuxnet’s intended target remained a matter of debate, the worm…

  • Scaduto, Matilda Genevieve (American musician)

    Felice Bryant, (Matilda Genevieve Scaduto), American songwriter (born Aug. 7, 1925, Milwaukee, Wis.—died April 22, 2003, Gatlinburg, Tenn.), with her husband, Boudleaux Bryant, formed one of the most successful and prolific songwriting teams in history. The pair met and married in 1945, and soon h

  • scaenae frons (Roman theatre)

    theatre design: Greece and Rome: …stage was backed by a scaenae frons that was as tall as the seating area and was divided into at least three stories with a roof extending over the raised stage area from the top level. The parodoi that had separated the house from the scene building in Greek theatres…

  • Scaevola frutescens (plant)

    Goodeniaceae: …such as Scaevola plumieri and S. frutescens. Both have oval, leathery leaves and small, starry, white flowers and are about 1.5 metres (5 feet) tall.

  • Scaevola plumieri (plant)

    Goodeniaceae: …tropical beach shrubs such as Scaevola plumieri and S. frutescens. Both have oval, leathery leaves and small, starry, white flowers and are about 1.5 metres (5 feet) tall.

  • Scaevola, Gaius Mucius (Roman hero)

    Gaius Mucius Scaevola, legendary Roman hero who is said to have saved Rome (c. 509 bc) from conquest by the Etruscan king Lars Porsena. According to the legend, Mucius volunteered to assassinate Porsena, who was besieging Rome, but killed his victim’s attendant by mistake. Brought before the

  • Scaevola, Publius Mucius (Roman consul)

    Publius Mucius Scaevola, one of the foremost Roman jurists of his time and a prominent figure in the events surrounding the downfall of Tiberius Gracchus. The son of Publius Mucius Scaevola, consul in 175 bc, Mucius held the office of people’s tribune in 141, when he instituted a tribunal to

  • Scaevola, Quintus Mucius (Roman law scholar)

    Quintus Mucius Scaevola, founder of the scientific study of Roman law. As consul in 95 Scaevola and his colleague obtained the passage of the Lex Licinia Mucia, which removed certain groups not amalgamated into the Roman Republic (the so-called Latin and Italian allies) from the citizen rolls. The

  • Scaevola, Quintus Mucius (Roman jurist)

    Quintus Mucius Scaevola, prominent Roman jurist. He was the cousin of Quintus Mucius Scaevola Pontifex, who founded the scientific study of Roman law. Instructed in law by his father and in philosophy by the stoic Panaetius of Rhodes, Scaevola became governor of the province of Asia about 120.

  • SCAF (government council, Egypt)

    Egypt: Government and society: …March 30, 2011, by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (Egypt’s interim military government). It incorporated provisions from the 1971 constitution as well as new measures, approved by referendum in March 2011, to make elections more open, impose presidential term limits, and restrict the use of emergency laws. The…

  • Scafell Pike (mountain, England, United Kingdom)

    Copeland: Scafell Pike, reaching an elevation of 3,210 feet (978 metres) above sea level, is England’s highest point and is located in the borough’s northeastern corner. There are also narrow coastal plains along the sea. Evidence of ancient Roman and Viking settlements is found throughout the…

  • scaffold (biology)

    regenerative medicine: Tissue scaffolds and soluble repair factors: Scaffolds and soluble factors, such as proteins and small molecules, have been used to induce tissue repair by undamaged cells at the site of injury. These agents protect resident fibroblasts and adult stem cells and stimulate the migration of these cells into damaged areas, where…

  • scaffold (construction)

    Scaffold, in building construction, temporary platform used to elevate and support workers and materials during the construction, repair, or cleaning of a structure or machine; it consists of one or more planks of convenient size and length, with various methods of support, depending on the form

  • scala media (anatomy)

    inner ear: …in the vestibule; and the cochlear duct, which is the only part of the inner ear involved in hearing. The cochlear duct forms a shelf across the cochlea dividing it into two sections, the scala vestibuli and the scala tympani. The entire inner ear is bathed in a cushioning fluid,…

  • scala mobile (economics)

    Italy: Later economic trends: …and a mechanism called the scala mobile, which adjusted wages to inflation on a quarterly basis for all wage and salary earners. The high degree of job security enjoyed by the Italian workforce raised production costs, which in turn contributed to inflation. Beginning with a decree in 1984 that imposed…

  • scala naturae (philosophy)

    Great Chain of Being, conception of the nature of the universe that had a pervasive influence on Western thought, particularly through the ancient Greek Neoplatonists and derivative philosophies during the European Renaissance and the 17th and early 18th centuries. The term denotes three general

  • Scala Santa (stairs, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: San Giovanni in Laterano: …(the papal chapel) and the Scala Santa (“Holy Stairs”) were preserved. The Scala Santa had been the principal ceremonial stairway of the palace, but about the 8th or 9th century it began to be identified popularly as having been brought from Jerusalem by St. Helena, Constantine’s mother, reportedly from Pontius…

  • scala tympani (anatomy)

    human ear: Structure of the cochlea: …a lower chamber called the scala tympani (tympanic ramp). The scala vestibuli and scala tympani, which are filled with perilymph, communicate with each other through an opening at the apex of the cochlea, called the helicotrema, which can be seen if the cochlea is sliced longitudinally down the middle. At…

  • scala vestibuli (anatomy)

    human ear: Structure of the cochlea: …an upper chamber called the scala vestibuli (vestibular ramp) and a lower chamber called the scala tympani (tympanic ramp). The scala vestibuli and scala tympani, which are filled with perilymph, communicate with each other through an opening at the apex of the cochlea, called the helicotrema, which can be seen…

  • Scala, Gia (actress)

    The Guns of Navarone: …(Irene Papas) and Anna (Gia Scala). The team is beset by a number of obstacles, including the discovery of a traitor in their midst, before they finally gain access to the Nazi guns. In a race against time, the group attempts to sabotage the weapons before they can wreak…

  • Scala, Teatro alla (opera house, Milan, Italy)

    La Scala, theatre in Milan, one of the principal opera houses of the world and the leading Italian house. Built in 1776–78 by Empress Maria Theresa of Austria (whose country then ruled Milan), it replaced an earlier theatre that had burned. In 1872 it became the property of the city of Milan. The

  • scalable vector graphics (graphics language)

    vector graphics: …a new graphics language called scalable vector graphics (SVG). SVG is a royalty-free language that contains vector shapes and text and can contain embedded raster graphics. One common application for vector graphics in general, and SVG specifically, is in geographic information systems (GIS). SVG is used in GIS applications to…

  • Scalacea (gastropod superfamily)

    gastropod: Classification: Superfamily Ptenoglossa (Scalacea) Wentletraps (Epitoniidae) live in shallow to deep ocean waters; purple snails (Janthinidae) float on the ocean surface after building a raft of bubbles; large numbers of bubble shells occasionally blow ashore. Superfamily Aglossa Parasitic or predatory snails either

  • scalar (mathematics and physics)

    Scalar, a physical quantity that is completely described by its magnitude; examples of scalars are volume, density, speed, energy, mass, and time. Other quantities, such as force and velocity, have both magnitude and direction and are called vectors. Scalars are described by real numbers that are

  • scalar multiplication (mathematics)

    mechanics: Vectors: …may be multiplied by a scalar. Thus, for example, the vector 2A has the same direction as A but is twice as long. If the scalar has dimensions, the resulting vector still has the same direction as the original one, but the two cannot be compared in magnitude. For example,…

  • scalar product (mathematics)

    mechanics: Vectors: …scalar product, or sometimes the inner product) is an operation that combines two vectors to form a scalar. The operation is written A · B. If θ is the (smaller) angle between A and B, then the result of the operation is A · B = AB cos θ. The…

  • scalare (fish)

    Scalare, any of several popular aquarium fishes of the angelfish (q.v.)

  • scalawag (United States history)

    Scalawag, after the American Civil War, a pejorative term for a white Southerner who supported the federal plan of Reconstruction or who joined with black freedmen and the so-called carpetbaggers in support of Republican Party policies. The origin of the term is unclear, but it was known in the

  • Scalawag (film by Douglas [1973])

    Kirk Douglas: …films, the ill-conceived pirate comedy Scalawag (1973), and the cynical western adventure Posse (1975), which became a cult favourite.

  • scaldic poetry (medieval literature)

    Skaldic poetry, oral court poetry originating in Norway but developed chiefly by Icelandic poets (skalds) from the 9th to the 13th century. Skaldic poetry was contemporary with Eddaic poetry but differed from it in metre, diction, and style. Eddaic poetry is anonymous, simple, and terse, often

  • scalding (cooking)

    boiling: Scalding is accomplished in water heated to around 185 °F (85 °C), usually in a double boiler, which conducts the heat of the water, contained in a bigger pan, to a smaller pan containing the food, thus avoiding contact between food and water. This technique…

  • scalding (food processing)

    poultry processing: Scalding: Following bleeding, the birds go through scalding tanks. These tanks contain hot water that softens the skin so that the feathers can be removed. The temperature of the water is carefully controlled. If retention of the yellow skin colour is desired, a soft-scald is…

  • scale (cartography)

    map: Map scales and classifications: Map scale refers to the size of the representation on the map as compared to the size of the object on the ground. The scale generally used in architectural drawings, for example, is 14 inch to one foot, which means that 14…

  • scale (music)

    Scale, in music, any graduated sequence of notes, tones, or intervals dividing what is called an octave. The specific selection of different tones in any piece of music generally reveals a pattern of relationships among its pitches that can be expressed as a series of fixed distances (intervals)

  • scale (organ pipe)

    keyboard instrument: Flue pipes: …of the mouth, and the scale, or the diameter of the pipe relative to its speaking length. The material of which the pipe is made also exerts an influence; it may be an alloy of lead and tin, wood, or, more rarely, pure tin or copper, and for the bass…

  • scale (art)

    architecture: Scale: When the proportions of architectural composition are applied to a particular building, the two-termed relationship of the parts to the whole must be harmonized with a third term—the observer, who not only sees the proportions of a door and their relationship to those of…

  • scale (wind systems)

    climate: Scale classes: Organized wind systems occur in spatial dimensions ranging from tens of metres to thousands of kilometres and possess residence times that vary from seconds to weeks. The concept of scale considers the typical size and lifetime of a phenomenon. Since the atmosphere exhibits…

  • scale (zoology)

    Scale, in zoology, small plate or shield forming part of the outer skin layers of certain animals. Scales provide protection from the environment and from predators. Fish scales are formed of bone from the deeper, or dermal, skin layer. The elasmobranchs (e.g., sharks) have placoid scales, which

  • scale breaker (metallurgy)

    steel: Hot strip: …slab moves first through a scale breaker, which is a two-high rolling mill with vertical rolls that loosens the furnace scale and removes it with high-pressure water jets. Then the slab passes through four-high roughing stands, typically four arranged in tandem, which roll it to a thickness of about 30…

  • scale insect (insect)

    Scale insect, any member of several families of insects (order Homoptera) that have a body covered by a protective waxy shell, often resembling scales or cottony cushions. The waxy covering is secreted by the insect after it settles on the plant where it will feed. Depending on the family, this

  • scale moss (plant)

    Leafy liverwort, (order Jungermanniales), order of numerous species of liverworts (division Marchantiophyta), in which the plant body is prostrate and extends horizontally in leaflike form with an upper and lower surface. The greatest number and variety of leafy liverworts are found in tropical

  • Scale of Perfection, The (work by Hilton)

    Walter Hilton: His major work was The Scale [or Ladder] of Perfection, written separately in two books. The first teaches the means by which a soul may advance toward perfection by destroying the image of sin and forming the image of Christ through the practice of virtue. The second distinguishes between the…

  • scale worm (annelid)

    Scale worm, any member of the superfamily Aphroditoidea (class Polychaeta, phylum Annelida), a group of widely distributed free-moving, segmented marine worms that possess dorsal scales. Scale worms range in size from 0.5 to 25 cm (about 0.2 to 10 inches). The superfamily is made up of several

  • scale, diseconomy of (economics)

    economy of scale: Conversely, diseconomy of scale can result when an increase in output causes the average cost to increase.

  • scale, economy of (economics)

    Economy of scale, in economics, the relationship between the size of a plant or industry and the lowest possible cost of a product. When a factory increases output, a reduction in the average cost of a product is usually obtained. This reduction is known as economy of scale. Increased labour

  • scale, returns to (economics)

    Returns to scale, in economics, the quantitative change in output of a firm or industry resulting from a proportionate increase in all inputs. If the quantity of output rises by a greater proportion—e.g., if output increases by 2.5 times in response to a doubling of all inputs—the production

  • scaled blenny (fish family)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Clinidae (clinids) Eocene to present. Percoidlike fishes, some moderately elongated, rather flat-sided, usually with somewhat pointed snouts and fleshy lips; dorsal and anal fins rather high and long-based, with fin membranes conspicuously supported by thin, riblike fin rays; caudal fin fanlike, not large; pelvic fins ahead…

  • Scaled Composites (American company)

    Burt Rutan: …Rutan launched a second company, Scaled Composites, which created research aircraft. SpaceShipOne was developed at Scaled Composites, with significant financial backing from billionaire Paul Allen, cofounder of Microsoft Corporation. The craft set a new civilian altitude record of 64 km (40 miles) in May 2004. Then, in October 2004, Rutan…

  • scaled quail (bird)

    quail: …scaled, or blue, quail (Callipepla squamata). Grayish, with scaly markings and a white-tipped crest, it is the fastest quail afoot, with running speeds measured at 24 km (15 miles) per hour. The mountain, or plumed, quail (Oreortyx pictus), gray and reddish with a long straight plume, is perhaps the…

  • scaleless dragonfish (fish)

    Scaleless dragonfish, any of the more than 180 species of marine fishes constituting the subfamily Melanostomiinae of the family Stomiidae (order Stomiiformes), with representatives inhabiting tropical regions of the major oceans. The name refers to the total absence of scales and the fierce

  • scalenohedron (crystallography)

    form: …that meet in a point; Scalenohedron: 8-faced (tetragonal) or 12-faced (hexagonal) closed form in which the faces are grouped in symmetrical pairs; in perfect crystals, each face is a scalene triangle; Trapezohedron: 6-, 8-, 12-, or 24-faced closed form in which half the faces are offset above the other half;…

  • Scalfaro, Oscar Luigi (president of Italy)

    Oscar Luigi Scalfaro, lawyer and politician who was president of Italy from 1992 to 1999. Educated at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan, Scalfaro worked as a prosecuting attorney. A member of the Christian Democrats (Democrazia Cristiana; DC), he was first elected to the Chamber

  • Scali, John A. (American journalist)

    John A. Scali, U.S. news correspondent who served as an unofficial go-between during what became known as the Cuban missile crisis and thus helped defuse tensions between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. (b. April 27, 1918--d. Oct. 9,

  • Scalia, Antonin (United States jurist)

    Antonin Scalia, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1986 to 2016, well known for his strong legal conservatism. He was the first Supreme Court justice of Italian ancestry. Scalia’s father, a Sicilian immigrant, taught Romance languages at Brooklyn College, and his

  • Scalia, Antonin Gregory (United States jurist)

    Antonin Scalia, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1986 to 2016, well known for his strong legal conservatism. He was the first Supreme Court justice of Italian ancestry. Scalia’s father, a Sicilian immigrant, taught Romance languages at Brooklyn College, and his

  • Scalibregma (polychaete genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: Polyophthalmus, Scalibregma. Order Capitellida No prostomial appendages; 1 or 2 anterior segments without setae; parapodia biramous; setae all simple; size, 1 to 20 or more cm; examples of genera: Capitella, Notomastus, Arenicola,

  • Scalich, Paul (German writer)

    encyclopaedia: It was Paul Scalich, a German writer and compiler, who was the first to use the word to describe a book in the title of his Encyclopaedia; seu, Orbis disciplinarum, tam sacrarum quam prophanum epistemon… (“Encyclopaedia; or, Knowledge of the World of Disciplines, Not Only Sacred but…

  • Scalidae (mollusk family)

    animal reproductive system: Annelids and mollusks: …marine gastropods of the family Scalidae that produce two kinds of sperm cells. A large sperm with a degenerate nucleus acts as a transport cell for carrying numerous small fertilizing sperm through the water and into the oviduct of another individual. Cephalopod males have modified arms for the transfer of…

  • Scaliger family (Italian family)

    Della Scala family, noted family that ruled Verona during the late 13th and the 14th centuries. Although the family had been prominent in Verona since the 11th century, the founder of the ruling dynasty was Mastino I della Scala (d. 1277), who became podesta (chief magistrate) shortly after the

  • Scaliger, Joseph Justus (Dutch philologist and historian)

    Joseph Justus Scaliger, Dutch philologist and historian whose works on chronology were among the greatest contributions of Renaissance scholars to revisions in historical and classical studies. The son of an Italian physician and philosopher, Julius Caesar Scaliger, who immigrated to Agen in 1525,

  • Scaliger, Julius Caesar (French scholar)

    Julius Caesar Scaliger, French classical scholar of Italian descent who worked in botany, zoology, grammar, and literary criticism. He claimed to be a descendant of the Della Scala family, whose Latinized name was Scaligerus and who had ruled the Italian city of Verona during the two preceding

  • Scaligeri family (Italian family)

    Della Scala family, noted family that ruled Verona during the late 13th and the 14th centuries. Although the family had been prominent in Verona since the 11th century, the founder of the ruling dynasty was Mastino I della Scala (d. 1277), who became podesta (chief magistrate) shortly after the

  • Scaligerus family (Italian family)

    Della Scala family, noted family that ruled Verona during the late 13th and the 14th centuries. Although the family had been prominent in Verona since the 11th century, the founder of the ruling dynasty was Mastino I della Scala (d. 1277), who became podesta (chief magistrate) shortly after the

  • Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti (architectural feature, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Piazza di Spagna: …dei Monti, known as the Spanish Steps (or Stairs). The staircase is a rare case of the failure of French cultural propaganda: although they are called the Spanish Steps—the Spanish Embassy moved onto the square in the 17th century—they are unequivocally French. First suggested by the French about the time…

  • scaling (organ pipe)

    keyboard instrument: Flue pipes: …of the mouth, and the scale, or the diameter of the pipe relative to its speaking length. The material of which the pipe is made also exerts an influence; it may be an alloy of lead and tin, wood, or, more rarely, pure tin or copper, and for the bass…

  • scaling (mining)

    mining: Horizontal openings: drifts: This process is called scaling. In small openings scaling is normally done by hand, with a special steel or aluminum tool resembling a long crowbar being used to “bar down” loose material. In larger openings and mechanized mines, a special machine with an impact hammer or scaling claw mounted…

  • scaling (painting)

    art conservation and restoration: Paintings on canvas: …a condition variously called “cleavage,” “flaking,” “blistering,” or “scaling.” The traditional method to address these problems is to reinforce the back of the canvas by attaching a new canvas to the old in a process called “lining,” also referred to as “relining.” A number of techniques and adhesives have…

  • Scalise, Gregorio (Italian poet)

    Italian literature: Poetry after World War II: …De Angelis and Giuseppe Conte; Gregorio Scalise, a paradoxical rationalizer of the irrational who has been compared to Woody Allen; the mysteriously apodictic and enigmatic Giuseppe Piccoli; antilyrical self-ironist Paolo Ruffilli; and Vivian Lamarque, whose childlike fairy-tale tone occasionally makes way for a mischievous home truth. Also notable are Mario…

  • scallion (plant)

    onion: Green onions, also called scallions and spring onions, are young onions harvested when their tops are green and the underdeveloped bulbs are 13 mm (0.5 inch) or less in diameter. Their flavour is mild, and the entire onion, including top, stem, and bulb, is used…

  • scallop (cave feature)

    cave: Solutional sculpturings: …small scooplike depressions known as scallops. Scallops vary in size from a few centimetres to more than one metre. They are asymmetrical in cross section, having a steep wall on the upstream side and a gentler slope on the downstream side. Scallops thus provide information as to the direction of…

  • scallop (meat)

    veal: Scallops, small thin slices—called scallopine in Italy and escalopes or médaillons in France—may be cooked in wine or other sauces.

  • scallop (bivalve)

    Scallop, any of the marine bivalve mollusks of the family Pectinidae, particularly species of the genus Pecten. The family, which includes about 50 genera and subgenera and more than 400 species, is worldwide in distribution and ranges from the intertidal zone to considerable ocean depths. The two

  • scalloped bonnethead shark (fish)
  • scalloped hammerhead (shark)
  • scallopine (meat)

    veal: Scallops, small thin slices—called scallopine in Italy and escalopes or médaillons in France—may be cooked in wine or other sauces.

  • scalp (anatomy)

    skin disease: Diagnosis: …individual on the face or scalp. In these instances a biopsy shows the abnormalities of the cells of the skin and the pattern and distribution of any invading cells. The ability to identify immunoreactants (immunoglobulins, or antibodies, that react with specific invading agents, or antigens) in skin biopsies has greatly…

  • Scalpel (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Multiple warheads: …advance came with the solid-fueled SS-24 Scalpel and SS-25 Sickle ICBMs, deployed in 1987 and 1985, respectively. The SS-24 could carry eight or 10 MIRVed warheads of 100 kilotons, and the SS-25 was fitted with a single 550-kiloton RV. Both missiles had a CEP of 650 feet. In addition to…

  • Scalpellomorpha (crustacean)

    cirripede: Annotated classification: Iblomorpha, Lepadomorpha, and Scalpellomorpha), the 3 best-known characterized below. Order Sessilia (operculate or sessile barnacles) Late Jurassic?, Cretaceous to present; capitulum relatively rigid; cemented directly to the substratum; supporting an operculum of 2 or 3 movable plates, or 2 to 3 pairs of movable plates; transient peduncle, disappearing…

  • Scalphunters, The (film by Pollack [1968])

    Sydney Pollack: Film directing: In 1968 Pollack made The Scalphunters, a comedic western starring Burt Lancaster, Ossie Davis, and Telly Savalas. The director then worked on The Swimmer (1968), an adaptation of a John Cheever story, but he was not credited. Lancaster starred in that film and returned for

  • scalping (rite of warfare)

    Scalping, removal of all or part of the scalp, with hair attached, from an enemy’s head. Historical evidence indicates that many cultures have engaged in the removal of body parts from their enemies. Most frequently these were used as trophies, displayed as proof of valour, held for mutilation

  • Scalvini, Giovita (Italian author)

    Italian literature: Opposing movements: Giovita Scalvini, and Ermes Visconti were among its contributors. Their efforts were silenced in 1820 when several of them were arrested by the Austrian police because of their liberal opinions; among them was Pellico, who later wrote a famous account of his experiences, Le mie…

  • scaly anteater (mammal)

    Pangolin, any of the about eight species of armoured placental mammals of the order Pholidota. Pangolin, from the Malay meaning “rolling over,” refers to this animal’s habit of curling into a ball when threatened. Pangolins—which are typically classified in the genera Manis, Phataginus, and Smutsia

  • scaly bulb (plant anatomy)

    bulb: The other type, the scaly bulb, as seen in true lilies, has naked storage leaves, unprotected by any papery covering, that make the bulb appear to consist of a series of angular scales. Bulbs can vary in size from insignificant pea-sized structures to those of large crinum lilies (Crinum…

  • scaly reptile (vertebrate)

    reptile: Annotated classification: Order Squamata (squamates) Lizards, snakes, and amphisbaenians. Upper Jurassic to present. Two suborders. Parietals fused; Jacobson’s organ with a fungiform projection and separate from nasal cavity, opening only into mouth cavity; paired functional hemipenes. Assorted References

  • scaly-tailed flying squirrel (rodent)

    flying squirrel: Classification and evolution: …of anomalure are occasionally called scaly-tailed flying squirrels, but these rodents are classified in the family Anomaluridae. Previously, flying squirrels were placed in the subfamily Pteromyinae within Pteromyidae. Some researchers speculated later that Pteromyinae was not a single group but members from two different clusters of tree squirrels or possibly…

  • scaly-tailed squirrel (rodent)

    Anomalure, (family Anomaluridae), any of seven African species of rodents comprising the large anomalures (genus Anomalurus), pygmy anomalures (genus Idiurus), and flightless anomalure (genus Zenkerella). All live in tropical forests, and the large and pygmy anomalures are the only gliding mammals

  • Scalzo, Chiostro dello (building, Florence, Italy)

    Andrea del Sarto: John the Baptist in the Chiostro dello Scalzo in Florence. Begun about 1511, the work was not completed until 1526, and almost all of it was painted by his own hand, so that it reads like an artistic autobiography covering the greater part of his career. His portraits of his…

  • Scamander River (river, Turkey)

    Troas: The Scamander (Kücük Menderes) River, fed from springs on the Ida mountains, has cut its way through the hills to the plain in the northwest and empties into the Hellespont just before the Hellespont flows into the Aegean.

  • Scamandrius (Greek mythology)

    Astyanax, in Greek legend, prince who was the son of the Trojan prince Hector and his wife Andromache. Hector named him Scamandrius after the River Scamander, near Troy. The Trojans named him Astyanax (“Lord of the City”) as the son of Troy’s greatest warrior. In the sixth book of the Iliad, Homer

  • scammony (drug)

    bindweed: Scammony, a purgative, is derived from the rhizomes of C. scammonia, a trailing perennial with white to pink flowers, native in western Asia.

  • Scamozzi, Vincenzo (Italian architect)

    Vincenzo Scamozzi, Italian architect, architectural theorist, and stage designer of the late Renaissance. Trained by his father, Bertotti Scamozzi, he studied in Venice and Rome and traveled widely through western Europe. The classicizing influence of Andrea Palladio and Sebastiano Serlio is

  • scampi (lobster)

    Scampi, (Nephrops norvegicus), edible lobster of the order Decapoda (class Crustacea). It is widespread in the Mediterranean and northeastern Atlantic, from North Africa to Norway and Iceland, and as a gastronomic delicacy it is commercially exploited over much of its range, particularly by Great

  • Scandal (film by Caton-Jones [1989])

    Christine Keeler: …were dramatized in the film Scandal (1989).

  • Scandal (novel by Wilson)

    A.N. Wilson: …Was Oswald Fish? (1981) and Scandal (1983) to the black comedy of The Healing Art (1980), Wise Virgin (1982), The Vicar of Sorrows (1993), and My Name Is Legion (2004). His other novels included works set in the past, such as Gentleman in England (1985); Love Unknown (1986); The Lampitt…

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