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  • Schlegel, August Wilhelm von (German scholar and critic)

    August Wilhelm von Schlegel, German scholar and critic, one of the most influential disseminators of the ideas of the German Romantic movement, and the finest German translator of William Shakespeare. He was also an Orientalist and a poet. Schlegel was a son of a Protestant pastor and a nephew of

  • Schlegel, Caroline (German intellectual)

    Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling: Period of intense productivity.: …there he became acquainted with Caroline Schlegel, among the most gifted women in German Romanticism, and married her in 1803. The unpleasant intrigues that accompanied this marriage and the dispute with Fichte caused Schelling to leave Jena, and he accepted an appointment at the University of Würzburg.

  • Schlegel, Friedrich von (German writer)

    Friedrich von Schlegel, German writer and critic, originator of many of the philosophical ideas that inspired the early German Romantic movement. Open to every new idea, he reveals a rich store of projects and theories in his provocative Aper?us and Fragmente (contributed to the Athen?um and other

  • Schlegel, Johann Elias (German author and critic)

    Johann Elias Schlegel, German author and critic whose plays and criticism helped give the German theatre a much-needed new impetus. He was educated at the famous classical-humanist boarding school Schulpforta. After studying law in Leipzig, he became private secretary to the Saxon ambassador in

  • Schleglerbund (European history)

    Swabia: …formed their own league, the Schleglerbund (from the German Schlegel, “Mallet,” or “Hammer,” on their insignia). In the ensuing civil war, Eberhard II, Ulrich III’s son and successor, joined by the Schleglerbund, defeated the Swabian cities in 1372.

  • Schleicher, August (German linguist)

    August Schleicher, German linguist whose work in comparative linguistics was a summation of the achievements up to his time and whose methodology provided the direction for much subsequent research. He was influenced by the philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel, which he espoused during his student days at

  • Schleicher, Kurt von (German army officer)

    Kurt von Schleicher, German army officer, last chancellor of the Weimar Republic, an opponent of Adolf Hitler in 1932–33. Joining the German military in 1900, Schleicher attached himself to the newly created Reichswehr in 1919 and by 1929 was a major general in charge of an office in the Reichswehr

  • Schleiden, Matthias Jacob (German botanist)

    Matthias Jakob Schleiden, German botanist, cofounder (with Theodor Schwann) of the cell theory. Schleiden was educated at Heidelberg (1824–27) and practiced law in Hamburg but soon developed his hobby of botany into a full-time pursuit. Repelled by contemporary botanists’ emphasis on

  • Schleiden, Matthias Jakob (German botanist)

    Matthias Jakob Schleiden, German botanist, cofounder (with Theodor Schwann) of the cell theory. Schleiden was educated at Heidelberg (1824–27) and practiced law in Hamburg but soon developed his hobby of botany into a full-time pursuit. Repelled by contemporary botanists’ emphasis on

  • Schleiermacher, Friedrich (German theologian)

    Friedrich Schleiermacher, German theologian, preacher, and classical philologist, generally recognized as the founder of modern Protestant theology. His major work, Der christliche Glaube (1821–22; 2nd ed. 1831; The Christian Faith), is a systematic interpretation of Christian dogmatics.

  • Schleiermacher, Friedrich Ernst Daniel (German theologian)

    Friedrich Schleiermacher, German theologian, preacher, and classical philologist, generally recognized as the founder of modern Protestant theology. His major work, Der christliche Glaube (1821–22; 2nd ed. 1831; The Christian Faith), is a systematic interpretation of Christian dogmatics.

  • Schleiter, Hellmuth Oskar (German professor)

    Sinarquism: …professor of languages in Guanajuato, Hellmuth Oskar Schleiter, who was a member of the Nazi Party and a German intelligence agent during World War I. The movement opposed communism, liberalism, and the United States and supported the fascist dictators Francisco Franco, Benito Mussolini, and Adolf Hitler.

  • Schleitheim Confession (Anabaptist confession)

    Schleitheim Confession, the first known Anabaptist confession. Drawn up at a conference at Schleitheim, near Schaffhausen, Switz., on Feb. 24, 1527, it was known as the Brüderlich Vereinigung (“Brotherly Union”) and in seven articles summarized certain tenets of the Swiss and south German

  • Schlemm’s canal (anatomy)

    glaucoma: …into a circular channel, the canal of Schlemm, from which the aqueous humour flows (by way of vessels called aqueous veins) into blood vessels. Blockage of the aqueous humour flow causes increased pressure in the posterior chamber, and this pressure is transmitted by way of the vitreous to the optic…

  • Schlemmer, Oskar (German artist)

    Oskar Schlemmer, German painter, sculptor, choreographer, and designer known for his abstract yet precise paintings of the human form as well as for his avant-garde ballet productions. Schlemmer was exposed to design theory at a young age as an apprentice in a marquetry workshop. He took classes at

  • Schlesien (historical region, Europe)

    Silesia, historical region that is now in southwestern Poland. Silesia was originally a Polish province, which became a possession of the Bohemian crown in 1335, passed with that crown to the Austrian Habsburgs in 1526, and was taken by Prussia in 1742. In 1945, at the end of World War II, Silesia

  • Schlesinger, Adam (American musician)

    Jonas Brothers: …Desmond Child and pop star Adam Schlesinger of the band Fountains of Wayne. Although it was given only a limited marketing push, the album sold 62,000 copies; still, the label dropped the band.

  • Schlesinger, Arthur Bancroft (American historian and educator)

    Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., American historian, educator, and public official. Schlesinger graduated from Harvard University in 1938 and achieved initial notice with his biography Orestes A. Brownson: A Pilgrim’s Progress (1939). After serving in the Office of War Information and the Office of

  • Schlesinger, Arthur M. (American historian)

    Arthur M. Schlesinger, American historian whose emphasis on social and urban developments greatly broadened approaches to U.S. history. Schlesinger graduated from Ohio State University in 1910. When he entered Columbia University, New York City, to continue graduate study in history, he came under

  • Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr. (American historian and educator)

    Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., American historian, educator, and public official. Schlesinger graduated from Harvard University in 1938 and achieved initial notice with his biography Orestes A. Brownson: A Pilgrim’s Progress (1939). After serving in the Office of War Information and the Office of

  • Schlesinger, Arthur Meier (American historian)

    Arthur M. Schlesinger, American historian whose emphasis on social and urban developments greatly broadened approaches to U.S. history. Schlesinger graduated from Ohio State University in 1910. When he entered Columbia University, New York City, to continue graduate study in history, he came under

  • Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr. (American historian and educator)

    Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., American historian, educator, and public official. Schlesinger graduated from Harvard University in 1938 and achieved initial notice with his biography Orestes A. Brownson: A Pilgrim’s Progress (1939). After serving in the Office of War Information and the Office of

  • Schlesinger, Bruno Walter (German conductor)

    Bruno Walter, German conductor known primarily for his interpretations of the Viennese school. Though out of step with 20th-century trends, he was such a fine musician that he became a major figure—filling the wide gulf between the extremes of his day, Arturo Toscanini and Wilhelm Furtw?ngler. He

  • Schlesinger, Frank (American astronomer)

    Frank Schlesinger, American astronomer who pioneered in the use of photography to map stellar positions and to measure stellar parallaxes, from which the most direct determinations of distance can be made. From 1899 to 1903 Schlesinger was in charge of the International Latitude Observatory at

  • Schlesinger, James (American economist and government official)

    James Rodney Schlesinger, American economist and government official (born Feb. 15, 1929, New York, N.Y.—died March 27, 2014, Baltimore, Md.), as the hawkish secretary of defense (1973–75) under Republican Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, championed a militant stance on nuclear weapons, a

  • Schlesinger, James Rodney (American economist and government official)

    James Rodney Schlesinger, American economist and government official (born Feb. 15, 1929, New York, N.Y.—died March 27, 2014, Baltimore, Md.), as the hawkish secretary of defense (1973–75) under Republican Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, championed a militant stance on nuclear weapons, a

  • Schlesinger, John (British director)

    John Schlesinger, English film director known for a wide variety of sensitively told stories set in his homeland and in the United States. Schlesinger’s father was a pediatrician, and both of his parents were accomplished musicians who encouraged his interest in the arts. He received a home movie

  • Schlesinger, John Richard (British director)

    John Schlesinger, English film director known for a wide variety of sensitively told stories set in his homeland and in the United States. Schlesinger’s father was a pediatrician, and both of his parents were accomplished musicians who encouraged his interest in the arts. He received a home movie

  • Schlesinger, Nan Field (American fashionista)

    Nan Kempner, (Nan Field Schlesinger), American fashionista (born July 24, 1930, San Francisco, Calif.—died July 3, 2005, New York, N.Y.), was an international trendsetter who for 50 years remained a devoted client of French haute couture. She was especially fond of handmade French luxury dresses t

  • Schlesinger-Mayer department store (Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Western architecture: Construction in iron and glass: …the Schlesinger-Mayer Department Store (later Carson Pirie Scott) in Chicago (1898–1904), in which the towered corner marked the climax of the logic of the steel frame and the entrance was made inviting with rich, naturalistic ornament. At the very end of the 19th century, the important emblem of modern commerce…

  • Schlesische Gedichte (work by Holtei)

    Karl von Holtei: Also successful were his Schlesische Gedichte (1830; “Silesian Poems”), written in his native dialect. He also wrote novels, including Die Vagabunden (1851; “The Vagabonds”) and Der letzte Kom?diant (1863; “The Last Comedian”), that are interesting when they draw on his own experience but suffer from loose construction and superficial…

  • Schleswig (Germany)

    Schleswig, city, Schleswig-Holstein Land (state), northern Germany. The city forms a semicircle around the head of the Schlei, a narrow inlet of the Baltic Sea that affords access to small vessels, northwest of Kiel. First mentioned in 804–808 as Sliesthorp (and later as Sliaswich), the town was in

  • Schleswig (historical region and duchy, Europe)

    Schleswig, historic and cultural region occupying the southern part of the Jutland Peninsula north of the Eider River. It encompasses the northern half of Schleswig-Holstein Land (state) in northern Germany and S?nderjylland region in southern Denmark. Schleswig became a Danish duchy in the 12th

  • Schleswig faience (pottery)

    Schleswig faience, tin-glazed earthenware made from 1755 to 1814 at the town of Schleswig in the Danish duchy of Schleswig (now the Land [state] of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany). The faience factory was set up by Johann Christian Ludwig von Lücke, a German artist-potter from Meissen, Saxony.

  • Schleswig-Holstein (state, Germany)

    Schleswig-Holstein, Land (state) located in northwestern Germany. Schleswig-Holstein extends from the lower course of the Elbe River and the state of Hamburg northward to Denmark and thus occupies the southern third of the Jutland Peninsula. Along its eastern coast is the Baltic Sea, and along its

  • Schleswig-Holstein question (European history)

    Schleswig-Holstein question, 19th-century controversy between Denmark, Prussia, and Austria over the status of Schleswig and Holstein. At this time the population of Schleswig was Danish in its northern portion, German in the south, and mixed in the northern towns and centre. The population of

  • Schleswig-Holstein Wadden Sea National Park (national park, Germany)

    Schleswig-Holstein: Geography: Schleswig-Holstein Wattenmeer (Wadden Sea) National Park protects the tidal flats and coastal wetlands along the state’s west coast and, together with Wattenmeer National Park of Lower Saxony and the Waddenzee conservation area in the Netherlands, was inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 2009.

  • Schleswig-Holstein Wattenmeer National Park (national park, Germany)

    Schleswig-Holstein: Geography: Schleswig-Holstein Wattenmeer (Wadden Sea) National Park protects the tidal flats and coastal wetlands along the state’s west coast and, together with Wattenmeer National Park of Lower Saxony and the Waddenzee conservation area in the Netherlands, was inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 2009.

  • Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, Alexandra, Princess of (queen consort of Great Britain)

    Alexandra, queen consort of King Edward VII of Great Britain. The eldest daughter of Christian IX of Denmark, Alexandra was married to Edward (then Albert Edward, prince of Wales) in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor, on March 10, 1863. The exceptional beauty and graceful manner of the princess made

  • Schley, Winfield S. (U.S. admiral)

    Battle of Santiago de Cuba: Sampson and Commodore Winfield S. Schley.

  • Schleyer, Johann Martin (German clergyman)

    Volapük: …language constructed in 1880 by Johann Martin Schleyer, a German cleric, and intended for use as an international second language. Although its vocabulary is based on English and the Romance languages, the word roots in Volapük have been modified to such a degree that they are virtually unrecognizable; for example,…

  • Schlick, Moritz (German philosopher)

    Moritz Schlick, German logical empiricist philosopher and a leader of the European school of positivist philosophers known as the Vienna Circle. After studies in physics at Heidelberg, Lausanne, Switzerland, and Berlin, where he studied with the German physicist Max Planck, Schlick earned his Ph.D.

  • Schlieffen Plan (German military history)

    Schlieffen Plan, battle plan first proposed in 1905 by Alfred, Graf (count) von Schlieffen, chief of the German general staff, that was designed to allow Germany to wage a successful two-front war. The plan was heavily modified by Schlieffen’s successor, Helmuth von Moltke, prior to and during its

  • Schlieffen, Alfred von (German military officer)

    Alfred von Schlieffen, German officer and head of the general staff who developed the plan of attack (Schlieffen Plan) that the German armies used, with significant modifications, at the outbreak of World War I. Schlieffen, the son of a Prussian general, entered the army in 1854. He soon moved to

  • Schlieffen, Alfred, Graf von (German military officer)

    Alfred von Schlieffen, German officer and head of the general staff who developed the plan of attack (Schlieffen Plan) that the German armies used, with significant modifications, at the outbreak of World War I. Schlieffen, the son of a Prussian general, entered the army in 1854. He soon moved to

  • Schliemann, Heinrich (German archaeologist)

    Heinrich Schliemann, German archaeologist and excavator of Troy, Mycenae, and Tiryns. He is sometimes considered to be the modern discoverer of prehistoric Greece, though scholarship in the late 20th and early 21st centuries revealed that much self-mythologizing was involved in establishing his

  • Schliemann, Johann Ludwig Heinrich Julius (German archaeologist)

    Heinrich Schliemann, German archaeologist and excavator of Troy, Mycenae, and Tiryns. He is sometimes considered to be the modern discoverer of prehistoric Greece, though scholarship in the late 20th and early 21st centuries revealed that much self-mythologizing was involved in establishing his

  • schlieren (geological structure)

    tektite: Form and markings: …system of contorted layers (schlieren) extending through the tektite and corresponding to variations in the silica content. They grade into the layering of the Muong-Nong tektites.

  • Schl?ndorff, Volker (German director)

    Volker Schl?ndorff, German film director and screenwriter who was a leading member of the postwar cinema movement in West Germany. Schl?ndorff studied filmmaking in Paris, serving as an assistant to directors Louis Malle, Alain Resnais, and Jean-Pierre Melville. After directing several projects for

  • Schloss Avalon (work by Alexis)

    Willibald Alexis: …more ambitious and original novel Schloss Avalon (1827). Although his home was in Berlin, where he edited the Berliner Konversationsblatt (1827–35) and contributed essays and reviews to literary journals, he traveled widely in Europe and recounted his experiences in travel books, among them Herbstreise durch Skandinavien (1828; “Autumn Journey Through…

  • Schloss Colditz (prisoner-of-war camp, Germany)

    Colditz Castle, German prisoner-of-war camp in World War II, the site of many daring escape attempts by Allied officers. The castle sits on a steep hill overlooking the Mulde River as it flows through the small Saxon town of Colditz, about 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Leipzig. A former residence

  • Schloss, Arthur David (British translator)

    Arthur David Waley, English sinologist whose outstanding translations of Chinese and Japanese literary classics into English had a profound effect on such modern poets as W.B. Yeats and Ezra Pound. (The family name was changed from Schloss to Waley, his mother’s maiden name, at the outset of World

  • Schloss, Das (novel by Kafka)

    The Castle, allegorical novel by Franz Kafka, published posthumously in German as Das Schloss in 1926. The setting of the novel is a village dominated by a castle. Time seems to have stopped in this wintry landscape, and nearly all the scenes occur in the dark. K., the otherwise nameless

  • Schloss, William (American director)

    William Castle, American director who was known for the innovative marketing techniques he used to promote his B-horror movies. He began his entertainment career as an actor in Off-Broadway productions, and he later directed a well-received stage version of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula. During this

  • Schlossberg (hill, Graz, Austria)

    Graz: …probably a fortress on the Schlossberg (“Castle Hill”), a rocky cone some 1,550 feet (470 metres) high that dominates the city. The name Graz is derived from gradec, a Slavic word meaning “small fortress.” First mentioned about 1128–29, it received town rights about 1240 and became the centre of Steiermark…

  • Schlossberg Museum (museum, Chemnitz, Germany)

    Chemnitz: The Schlossberg Museum in the former Benedictine monastery (1136) includes a late Gothic hall church with valuable sculptures. Chemnitz has an opera house, several museums (including the Museum of Saxon Vehicles and a city art gallery), and a municipal zoo with an amphibian house. It is…

  • Schlosser, Friedrich (German historian)

    Friedrich Schlosser, historian and teacher whose universal histories stressing a moralistic and judgmental approach to the past were the most popular historical works in Germany before the rise of Leopold von Ranke and his demands for more scientific standards of scholarship. Schlosser was the son

  • Schlosser, Max (German zoologist)

    artiodactyl: Critical appraisal: …classification proposed by German zoologist Max Schlosser, some authorities have grouped the Bovinae, Cephalophinae, and Hippotragineae as the Bo?dontia and the Alcelaphinae, Antilopinae, and Caprinae as the Aegodontia, to indicate phyletic lines believed to have arisen early in bovid history. Bo?donts and aegodonts have evolved differently in Africa and Eurasia,…

  • Schlosstheater (theatre, Celle, Germany)

    Lower Saxony: National parks and cultural life: …Stadttheater; and in Celle, the Schlosstheater, whose plays are performed in a fine Baroque building dating from 1674. In recognition of their Romanesque architecture and art, St. Mary’s Cathedral and St. Michael’s Church in Hildesheim were designated UNESCO World Heritage sites in 1985.

  • Schl?zer, August Ludwig von (German historian)

    textual criticism: Critical methods: …as the 18th-century German historian A.L. von Schl?zer: that each case is special. The critic must begin by defining the problem presented by his particular material and the consequent limitations of his inquiry. Everything that is said below about “method” must be understood in the light of this general proviso.…

  • Schluderpacheru, Herbert Charles Angelo Kuchacevich ze (Czech actor)

    Herbert Lom, Czech actor whose brooding looks and versatility allowed him a highly diverse screen career, though he was perhaps best known for his work in the Pink Panther film series. Lom was born to a titled but fading aristocratic family. Sources differ on his birth date, giving either January 9

  • Schlumberger, Conrad (German geophysicist)

    Conrad Schlumberger and Marcel Schlumberger: Conrad graduated from the école Polytechnique in Paris in 1900. He taught physics at the école Supérieure des Mines, also in Paris, from 1907, interrupting his academic career during World War I (1914–18) to serve as an artillery officer in the French army. Marcel studied…

  • Schlumberger, Conrad; and Schlumberger, Marcel (German geophysicists)

    Conrad Schlumberger and Marcel Schlumberger, French brothers, geophysicists and petroleum engineers noted for their invention, in 1927, of a method of continuous electric logging of boreholes. Their application of physics for use in geology brought major and universally adopted changes in mining

  • Schlumberger, Marcel (German geophysicist)

    Conrad Schlumberger and Marcel Schlumberger: Marcel studied engineering at the école Centrale in Paris, graduating in 1907, and in 1909 he went to work for foreign mining interests owned by his wife’s family; he too served in the army during the war.

  • Schlumbergera (plant genus)

    Schlumbergera, genus of six species of spineless cacti (family Cactaceae) native to rainforests in Brazil. The plants grow as epiphytes, mainly on trees or shrubs but sometimes in shady places among rocks. Several species are grown for their striking elongated flowers. Members of the genus are

  • Schlumbergera buckleyi (plant, Schlumbergera hybrid)

    Christmas cactus, (hybrid Schlumbergera ×buckleyi), popular cactus of the family Cactaceae that has flattened stems and is grown for its striking cerise flowers, blooming indoors about Christmastime in the Northern Hemisphere. Most Christmas cacti now in cultivation are considered to be hybrids of

  • Schlumbergera truncata (plant)

    Christmas cactus: …is often confused with the Thanksgiving cactus; however, in the former the margins of the stem joints are crenated (they have rounded indentations), whereas in the latter the margins are sharply saw-toothed. Given that Thanksgiving cacti bloom in late fall, they are often erroneously marketed as Christmas cacti.

  • Schlüsselzusatz SZ40 (German code device)

    Colossus: …that the British code-named “Tunny.” Tunny was the Schlüsselzusatz (SZ) cipher attachment, manufactured by Berlin engineering company C. Lorenz AG. Tunny sent its messages in binary code—packets of zeroes and ones resembling the binary code used inside present-day computers.

  • Schlüter, Andreas (German sculptor)

    Andreas Schlüter, sculptor and architect, the first important master of the late Baroque style in Germany, noted for infusing the bravura style of Baroque sculpture with a tense, personal quality. Schlüter’s early life is obscure, but he received training in Danzig and was active in Warsaw

  • Schlüter, Poul (Danish politician)

    Denmark: Postwar politics: …leader of the Conservative Party, Poul Schlüter, formed a minority government with three other centre-right parties: the Liberals, the Centre Democrats, and the Christian People’s Party. Together, they had only 66 seats in the Folketing.

  • Schmalkaldic Articles (Lutheran confession)

    Schmalkaldic Articles, one of the confessions of faith of Lutheranism, written by Martin Luther in 1536. The articles were prepared as the result of a bull issued by Pope Paul III calling for a general council of the Roman Catholic Church to deal with the Reformation movement. (The council was

  • Schmalkaldic League (religious and political alliance)

    Schmalkaldic League, during the Reformation, a defensive alliance formed by Protestant territories of the Holy Roman Empire to defend themselves collectively against any attempt to enforce the recess of the Diet of Augsburg in 1530, which gave the Protestant territories a deadline by which to

  • Schmalkaldic War (European history)

    Czechoslovak history: Religious tensions in Bohemia: …these problems arose during the Schmalkaldic War (1546–47), fought between the Habsburgs and the Schmalkaldic League, a defensive alliance formed by Protestant territories of the Holy Roman Empire. The Bohemian estates wavered considerably in their loyalty to the empire, and so, after the Habsburg victory at Mühlberg (April 1547), Ferdinand…

  • Schmalkaldischer Bund (religious and political alliance)

    Schmalkaldic League, during the Reformation, a defensive alliance formed by Protestant territories of the Holy Roman Empire to defend themselves collectively against any attempt to enforce the recess of the Diet of Augsburg in 1530, which gave the Protestant territories a deadline by which to

  • Schmallenberg virus (infectious agent)

    bunyavirus: Schmallenberg virus, which belongs to Orthobunyavirus, causes congenital malformations and stillbirths in ruminants, including cattle and sheep. It was first isolated in 2011, when a mysterious illness characterized by diarrhea, fever, and reduced milk production struck dairy cattle in Germany. Its primary vector appears to…

  • Schmandt-Besserat, Denise (French-American archaeologist)

    writing: Sumerian writing: The French American archaeologist Denise Schmandt-Besserat, building on a hypothesis advanced by the Assyriologist Pierre Amiet of the Louvre, demonstrated a series of small steps leading from the use of tokens for simple bookkeeping purposes to the development of written tablets on which graphs of the script stand for…

  • Schmeiderberg, Oswald (German scientist)

    pharmacology: …19th century by the German Oswald Schmeiderberg (1838–1921). He defined its purpose, wrote a textbook of pharmacology, helped to found the first pharmacological journal, and, most importantly, headed a school at Strasbourg that became the nucleus from which independent departments of pharmacology were established in universities throughout the world. In…

  • Schmeisser, Hugo (German inventor)

    small arm: The submachine gun: …Pistole 1918 Bergmann, designed by Hugo Schmeisser and employed by the Germans during the last few months of the war. The barrel of the MP18 was less than eight inches long, and it was chambered for 9-mm rounds introduced in 1908 for Parabellum, or Luger, pistols. It operated under a…

  • Schmelen, Heinrich (English missionary)

    Bethanie: In 1814 Heinrich Schmelen, a missionary of the London Missionary Society, established at Bethanie the first mission station in southwestern Africa. The mission was set up for the Nama (local Khoekhoe) and the Oorlams (people of white and Khoekhoe ancestry who arrived with Schmelen from the Cape…

  • Schmeling, Gertrud Elisabeth (German opera singer)

    Gertrud Elisabeth Mara, German soprano of great technical ability, who was one of the few non-Italians of the time to gain a great international reputation. A child prodigy, Schmeling gave violin recitals accompanied by her father, a violin maker, in Vienna and London, where at the age of 10 she

  • Schmeling, Max (German boxer)

    Max Schmeling, German heavyweight boxer who, from June 12, 1930, when Jack Sharkey lost to him by disqualification, until June 21, 1932, when he was outpointed by Sharkey in 15 rounds, held the world heavyweight boxing title, the first European to do so. Schmeling became interested in boxing in

  • Schmeling, Maximilian (German boxer)

    Max Schmeling, German heavyweight boxer who, from June 12, 1930, when Jack Sharkey lost to him by disqualification, until June 21, 1932, when he was outpointed by Sharkey in 15 rounds, held the world heavyweight boxing title, the first European to do so. Schmeling became interested in boxing in

  • Schmelzer, Johann Heinrich (Austrian musician)

    sonata: Early development outside Italy: …influence was the Austrian composer Johann Heinrich Schmelzer. In Nürnberg in 1659 he published a set of trio sonatas for strings, following it in 1662 with a set for mixed strings and wind instruments, and in 1664 with what may have been the first set of sonatas for unaccompanied violin.…

  • Schmerling, Anton, Ritter von (Austrian statesman)

    Anton, Ritter (knight) von Schmerling, Austrian statesman who served as imperial minister of the interior; he was the principal author of the February Patent (1861), which provided the first period of sustained constitutional government for the Habsburg Empire. An opponent of the conservative

  • Schmich, Mary (American columnist)

    Brenda Starr: In 1985 Chicago Tribune columnist Mary Schmich took on full-time writing duties, and she was joined by artists Ramona Fradon (1985–95) and June Brigman (1995–2011). Schmich and Brigman concluded their run on Brenda Starr in January 2011, and the final strip featured Brenda leaving her reporting job at The Flash.…

  • Schmid, Carlo (German political leader)

    Ferdinand Lassalle: Legacy: …the German Social Democratic leader Carlo Schmid, a Lassalle “who in place of scientific analysis constantly fixed his sights on the true aim on history’s horizon: the liberation of man from the position of object and the elimination of man’s alienation from himself through the power of his own will.”

  • Schmidt camera

    Schmidt telescope, telescope in which a spherical primary mirror receives light that has passed through a thin aspherical lens, called a correcting plate, that compensates for the image distortions—namely, spherical aberrations—produced by the mirror. The Schmidt telescope is thus a catadioptric

  • Schmidt syndrome (pathology)

    myxedema: …cortices (Addison disease; also called Schmidt syndrome).

  • Schmidt telescope

    Schmidt telescope, telescope in which a spherical primary mirror receives light that has passed through a thin aspherical lens, called a correcting plate, that compensates for the image distortions—namely, spherical aberrations—produced by the mirror. The Schmidt telescope is thus a catadioptric

  • Schmidt vertical-field balance

    magnetometer: The Schmidt vertical-field balance, a relative magnetometer used in geophysical exploration, uses a horizontally balanced bar magnet equipped with mirror and knife edges.

  • Schmidt, Arno Otto (German author)

    Arno Schmidt, novelist, translator, and critic, whose experimental prose established him as the preeminent Modernist of 20th-century German literature. With roots in both German Romanticism and Expressionism, he attempted to develop modern prose forms that correspond more closely to the workings of

  • Schmidt, Bernhard Voldemar (German optician)

    Bernhard Voldemar Schmidt, optical instrument maker who invented the telescope named for him, an instrument widely used to photograph large sections of the sky because of its large field of view and its fine image definition. Schmidt worked as a telegraph operator, photographer, and designer until

  • Schmidt, Brian P. (American-born Australian astronomer)

    Brian P. Schmidt, astronomer who was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics for his discovery of dark energy, a repulsive force that is the dominant component (73 percent) of the universe. He shared the prize with American physicist Saul Perlmutter and astronomer Adam Riess. Schmidt held dual

  • Schmidt, Eric (American engineer and business executive)

    Eric Schmidt, American information technology executive who served (2001–11) as chairman and CEO of Google Inc., overseeing a vast expansion of the company’s activities. Schmidt grew up in Blacksburg, Virginia, where his father was a professor of economics at Virginia Tech. He entered Princeton

  • Schmidt, Eric Emerson (American engineer and business executive)

    Eric Schmidt, American information technology executive who served (2001–11) as chairman and CEO of Google Inc., overseeing a vast expansion of the company’s activities. Schmidt grew up in Blacksburg, Virginia, where his father was a professor of economics at Virginia Tech. He entered Princeton

  • Schmidt, Friedrich (German architect)

    Western architecture: Germany and central Europe: Friedrich Schmidt, who had worked under Zwirner at Cologne, was the leading revivalist. He built no fewer than eight churches in Vienna, ranging in date from the church of the Lazarists (1860–62) to St. Severinus Church (1877–78). The most ambitious is the Fünfhaus parish church…

  • Schmidt, Hans (German poet)

    prosody: Quantitative metres: …Ode,” by the 19th-century poet Hans Schmidt, which was beautifully set to music by Johannes Brahms (Opus 94, No. 4):

  • Schmidt, Harry (United States Marine Corps officer)

    Battle of Iwo Jima: Battle: Harry Schmidt took charge of Marine operations. He fielded the largely veteran 3rd, 4th, and 5th Marine divisions, totaling some 70,000 troops. U.S. intelligence had reported only 13,000 Japanese defenders and excellent beach terrain for landing, so planners chose to have the Marines land on…

  • Schmidt, Helmut (chancellor of West Germany)

    Helmut Schmidt, Social Democratic politician who was chancellor of West Germany from 1974 to 1982. He later was copublisher (1983–2015) of the influential weekly Die Zeit. Schmidt, who was the son of a half-Jewish teacher, served in the Wehrmacht (German Army) during World War II. He was assigned

  • Schmidt, Helmut Heinrich Waldemar (chancellor of West Germany)

    Helmut Schmidt, Social Democratic politician who was chancellor of West Germany from 1974 to 1982. He later was copublisher (1983–2015) of the influential weekly Die Zeit. Schmidt, who was the son of a half-Jewish teacher, served in the Wehrmacht (German Army) during World War II. He was assigned

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