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  • Schmidt, Johann Kaspar (German philosopher)

    Max Stirner, German antistatist philosopher in whose writings many anarchists of the late 19th and the 20th centuries found ideological inspiration. His thought is sometimes regarded as a source of 20th-century existentialism. After teaching in a girls’ preparatory school in Berlin, Stirner made a

  • Schmidt, Johannes (German linguist)

    linguistics: Criticisms of the comparative method: In 1872 a German scholar, Johannes Schmidt, criticized the family-tree theory and proposed instead what is referred to as the wave theory, according to which different linguistic changes will spread, like waves, from a politically, commercially, or culturally important centre along the main lines of communication, but successive innovations will…

  • Schmidt, Johannes (Danish biologist)

    eel: Natural history: …to 1930, a Danish biologist, Johannes Schmidt, established the early life history of the European and American freshwater eels. Although parts of his work have been questioned, his description of a western Atlantic spawning and a trans-Atlantic dispersal of leptocephali of these eels still stands.

  • Schmidt, Jozef (Polish athlete)

    athletics: The triple jump: …and set five world records; Jozef Schmidt (Poland), also a two-time Olympic champion, set a record in 1960 of 17.03 metres (55 feet 10.5 inches) and was the first to go over the 17-metre barrier; and Viktor Saneyev (U.S.S.R.) had three world records and three Olympic wins and one second…

  • Schmidt, Karl (German artist)

    Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, German painter and printmaker who was noted for his Expressionist landscapes and nudes. In 1905 Schmidt-Rottluff began to study architecture in Dresden, Germany, where he and his friend Erich Heckel met Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Fritz Bleyl, two other architecture students

  • Schmidt, Karl P. (American zoologist)

    Karl P. Schmidt, U.S. zoologist whose international reputation derived from the principles of animal ecology he established through his theoretical studies and fieldwork. He was also a leading authority on herpetology, contributing significantly to the scientific literature on amphibians and

  • Schmidt, K?the (German artist)

    K?the Kollwitz, German graphic artist and sculptor who was an eloquent advocate for victims of social injustice, war, and inhumanity. The artist grew up in a liberal middle-class family and studied painting in Berlin (1884–85) and Munich (1888–89). Impressed by the prints of fellow artist Max

  • Schmidt, Maarten (Dutch-American astronomer)

    Maarten Schmidt, Dutch-born American astronomer whose identification of the wavelengths of the radiation emitted by quasars (quasi-stellar objects) led to the theory that they may be among the most distant, as well as the oldest, objects ever observed. Schmidt was educated at the universities of

  • Schmidt, Michael Jack (American baseball player)

    Mike Schmidt, American professional baseball player, one of the finest all-around third basemen in history. He spent his entire career with the National League Philadelphia Phillies. Schmidt played college baseball in Ohio and was drafted by the Phillies in 1971. After playing for their minor

  • Schmidt, Mike (American baseball player)

    Mike Schmidt, American professional baseball player, one of the finest all-around third basemen in history. He spent his entire career with the National League Philadelphia Phillies. Schmidt played college baseball in Ohio and was drafted by the Phillies in 1971. After playing for their minor

  • Schmidt, Milt (Canadian-born ice hockey player)

    Milt Schmidt, (Milton Conrad Schmidt), Canadian ice hockey player (born March 5, 1918, Kitchener, Ont.—died Jan. 4, 2017, Needham, Mass.), was the most-aggressive and speediest member of the famed Kraut Line (with left wing Woody Dumart and right wing Bobby Bauer) of the NHL Boston Bruins during

  • Schmidt, Milton Conrad (Canadian-born ice hockey player)

    Milt Schmidt, (Milton Conrad Schmidt), Canadian ice hockey player (born March 5, 1918, Kitchener, Ont.—died Jan. 4, 2017, Needham, Mass.), was the most-aggressive and speediest member of the famed Kraut Line (with left wing Woody Dumart and right wing Bobby Bauer) of the NHL Boston Bruins during

  • Schmidt, Wilhelm (German-Austrian anthropologist and linguist)

    Wilhelm Schmidt, German anthropologist and Roman Catholic priest who led the influential cultural-historical European school of ethnology. He was a member of the Society of the Divine Word missionary order. Schmidt was early influenced by such anthropologists as Franz Boas and Edward Westermarck,

  • Schmidt, Wilhelm Matth?us (German-Austrian anthropologist and linguist)

    Wilhelm Schmidt, German anthropologist and Roman Catholic priest who led the influential cultural-historical European school of ethnology. He was a member of the Society of the Divine Word missionary order. Schmidt was early influenced by such anthropologists as Franz Boas and Edward Westermarck,

  • Schmidt-Maksutov telescope

    Schmidt telescope: The Schmidt-Maksutov telescope, invented by Russian optician Dmitry D. Maksutov in 1941, is similar in design and purpose to the Schmidt telescope but has a spherical meniscus, a lens in which one side is concave and the other is convex, in place of the correcting plate…

  • Schmidt-Nielsen, Knut (Norwegian zoologist)

    nasal gland: Schmidt-Nielsen and coworkers solved the long-standing problem of how oceanic birds can live without fresh water. They found that a gland, located above each eye, removes sodium chloride from the blood far more efficiently than does the avian kidney and excretes it as brine through…

  • Schmidt-Rottluff, Karl (German artist)

    Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, German painter and printmaker who was noted for his Expressionist landscapes and nudes. In 1905 Schmidt-Rottluff began to study architecture in Dresden, Germany, where he and his friend Erich Heckel met Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Fritz Bleyl, two other architecture students

  • schmierkase (food)

    Cottage cheese, fresh, soft, unripened cheese consisting of curds of varying sizes, usually mixed with some whey or cream. It is white and mild but faintly sour in taste. In commercial cheese making, the curds are derived from pasteurized skim milk or reconstituted, low-fat milk products. The whey

  • Schmilco (album by Wilco)

    Wilco: Schmilco (2016) was largely acoustic, quiet, and personal. In 2017 Wilco went on hiatus, and Tweedy released Together at Last, a collection of solo acoustic versions of previously released Wilco songs. He then recorded original material for Warm (2018) and Warmer (2019). During this time…

  • Schmirler, Sandra (Canadian athlete)

    Sandra Schmirler, Canadian curler (born June 11, 1963, Biggar, Sask.—died March 2, 2000, Regina, Sask.), was captain of the Canadian women’s curling team that won a gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics—the first Olympics in which curling was a medal sport. Before Schmirler and her Olympic t

  • Schmit, Timothy B. (American musician)

    Poco: Later members included Timothy B. Schmit (b. October 30, 1947, Sacramento, California) and Paul Cotton (b. February 26, 1943, Los Angeles, California).

  • Schmitt, Carl (German jurist and political theorist)

    Carl Schmitt, German conservative jurist and political theorist, best known for his critique of liberalism, his definition of politics as based on the distinction between friends and enemies, and his overt support of Nazism. Schmitt studied law in Berlin, Munich, and Hamburg, graduating with a

  • Schmitt, Florent (French composer)

    Florent Schmitt, composer known for his orchestral works. He studied at Nancy and under Massenet and Fauré at the Paris Conservatoire. In 1900 he won the Prix de Rome with his lyric scene Sémiramis. He gained fame with the Psaume XLVI (1904) for chorus and orchestra, the ballet La Tragédie de

  • Schmitt, Harrison (American astronaut and politician)

    Harrison Schmitt, American geologist, astronaut, and politician. Schmitt was educated at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, the University of Oslo, and Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., where he received a Ph.D. in geology in 1964. He was employed by the U.S.

  • Schmitt, Harrison Hagan (American astronaut and politician)

    Harrison Schmitt, American geologist, astronaut, and politician. Schmitt was educated at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, the University of Oslo, and Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., where he received a Ph.D. in geology in 1964. He was employed by the U.S.

  • Schmitt, Jack (American astronaut and politician)

    Harrison Schmitt, American geologist, astronaut, and politician. Schmitt was educated at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, the University of Oslo, and Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., where he received a Ph.D. in geology in 1964. He was employed by the U.S.

  • Schmitt, Kurt (German statesman)

    Third Reich: The Enabling Act and the Nazi revolution: …the Ministry of Economy was Kurt Schmitt, director-general of the largest insurance company in Germany, while Hjalmar Schacht, the new president of the Reichsbank (appointed on March 16), set his face firmly against radical anticapitalist experiments.

  • Schmitt, Pál (president of Hungary)

    Hungary: Economic and social change: Pál Schmitt had plagiarized significant portions of his 1992 doctoral dissertation. A subsequent investigation by the university that had conferred the degree revealed that Schmitt had copied extensively from a pair of sources, and he was stripped of his degree. In a blow to the…

  • Schmitz, Ettore (Italian author)

    Italo Svevo, Italian novelist and short-story writer, a pioneer of the psychological novel in Italy. Svevo (whose pseudonym means “Italian Swabian”) was the son of a German-Jewish glassware merchant and an Italian mother. At 12 he was sent to a boarding school near Würzburg, Ger. He later returned

  • Schmitz, Kim (German entrepreneur)

    Megaupload: …computer service created by entrepreneur Kim Schmitz that was shut down in 2012 by the United States government after its founders were charged for violating antipiracy laws. It was based in Hong Kong.

  • Schmoke, Kurt (American politician)

    Million Man March: …along with Marion Barry and Kurt Schmoke, then the mayors of Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Md., respectively. “Let our choices be for life, for protecting our women, our children, keeping our brothers free of drugs, free of crime,” Schmoke told the crowd, which assembled on the Mall. It was reported…

  • Schmoller, Gustav (German economist)

    John Neville Keynes: …the followers of German economist Gustav von Schmoller, who advocated an inductive approach. Keynes, by contrast, insisted that both induction and deduction were essential components of sound economic analysis. He felt that inductive reasoning provided the general premises upon which deduction had to be based and that deduction resulted in…

  • Schmorell, Alexander (German activist)

    White Rose: members—Hans Scholl, Willi Graf, and Alexander Schmorell—were medical students at the University of Munich. While on the Eastern Front, the trio observed the murder of Jewish civilians by SS troops. When they returned to Munich, the three joined with other students—including Hans’s sister Sophie—to discuss their opposition to the Nazi…

  • Schmucker, S. S. (American theologian)

    S.S. Schmucker, theologian and educator who was a principal exponent of the American Lutheran movement, which sought to create a particularly American expression of Lutheranism. Schmucker joined in the establishment of the General Synod (1820) that coordinated the various Lutheran churches in the

  • Schmucker, Samuel Simon (American theologian)

    S.S. Schmucker, theologian and educator who was a principal exponent of the American Lutheran movement, which sought to create a particularly American expression of Lutheranism. Schmucker joined in the establishment of the General Synod (1820) that coordinated the various Lutheran churches in the

  • Schnabel, Artur (Austrian pianist)

    Artur Schnabel, Austrian pianist and teacher whose performances and recordings made him a legend in his own time and a model of scholarly musicianship to all later pianists. Schnabel was a child prodigy and studied in Vienna with the celebrated pianist and teacher Theodor Leschetizky. He lived in

  • Schnabel, Julian (American painter, printmaker, sculptor, and filmmaker)

    Julian Schnabel, American painter, printmaker, sculptor, and filmmaker who was one of a number of international painters—including David Salle in the United States, Georg Baselitz in Germany, and Francesco Clemente in Italy—to emerge in the late 1970s whose bold expressive style was termed

  • Schnapsen (card game)

    Sixty-six, two-player card game, ancestral to bezique and pinochle, that was first recorded in 1718 under the name Mariagen-Spiel (German: “the marriage game”). It is still popular in Germany, even more so in Austria under the name Schnapsen (“booze”). The game uses a deck of 24 cards, ranked

  • schnauzer (dog)

    Schnauzer, any of three breeds of dogs—the standard, miniature, and giant schnauzers—developed in Germany and named for their distinctive “mustache.” The standard, or medium-sized, schnauzer is the stock from which the other two breeds were derived. It is shown in paintings and in a statue dating

  • Schneckenburger, Max (German writer)

    Rhine River: History: In 1840 Max Schneckenburger wrote his patriotic poem “Die Wacht am Rhein” (“The Watch on the Rhine”), which was set to music by Karl Wilhelm in 1854 and became the rousing tune of the Prussian armies in the Franco-German War of 1870–71. One result of this war…

  • Schnee, Charles (American screenwriter)
  • Schnee-Eifel (region, Germany)

    Eifel: …plateau falls into three sections: Schneifel or Schnee-Eifel, Hocheifel, and Voreifel. In the Schneifel (German: “Snow Eifel”), near the Belgian frontier, scrub and forest are common, with cultivation only on the richer soils. The Hocheifel (“High Eifel”), which includes the highest point in the plateau, Hohe Acht (2,451 feet [747…

  • Schneemann, Carolee (American multimedia artist)

    Carolee Schneemann, American multimedia artist whose feminist artworks dealt with identity and gender politics and social taboos. She is known for her provocative performance art practices and is considered the progenitor of body art. Schneemann studied philosophy and poetry at Bard College (B.A.

  • Schneer, Charles (American film producer)

    Ray Harryhausen: …caught the attention of producer Charles Schneer, with whom he would work on the majority of his films.

  • Schneerson, Menachem Mendel (American rabbi)

    Menachem Mendel Schneerson, Russian-born rabbi (born April 14, 1902, Nikolayev, Russia [now in Ukraine]—died June 12, 1994, New York, N.Y.), was a towering figure in Orthodox Judaism and for 44 years the charismatic spiritual leader of the New York-based Lubavitch Hasidic movement. He built a r

  • Schneidemühl (Poland)

    Pi?a, city, Wielkopolskie województwo (province), west-central Poland, on the Gwda River. Its economic growth has been steady since World War II. Industries include lumber mills, railroad workshops, potato-processing facilities, and an electric-bulb factory. The city is a railway junction on the

  • Schneider (French tank)

    tank: World War I: …the first French tank (the Schneider) amounted to an armoured box on a tractor chassis; 400 were ordered in February 1916. But French tanks were not used until April 1917, whereas British tanks were first sent into action on September 15, 1916. Only 49 were available and their success was…

  • Schneider et Cie (French firm)

    naval ship: Armour: The firm Schneider & Cie in France invented an oil-tempering process to produce a homogeneous steel plate that had good resiliency and greater resistance than compound armour. The later addition of nickel further improved its resistance.

  • Schneider SA (French firm)

    naval ship: Armour: The firm Schneider & Cie in France invented an oil-tempering process to produce a homogeneous steel plate that had good resiliency and greater resistance than compound armour. The later addition of nickel further improved its resistance.

  • Schneider Trophy (air race award)

    air racing: …series of races for the Schneider Trophy, a truly international speed contest for seaplanes, which was held at various locations around the world, starting with Monaco (1913). The racing series ended in 1931, following three consecutive victories by the English entrant (in 1927, 1929, and 1931), as under the trophy…

  • Schneider, Abraham Alexander (American musician and conductor)

    Alexander Schneider, Russian-born U.S. violinist and conductor (born Oct. 21, 1908, Vilna, Russian Empire [now Vilnius, Lithuania]—died Feb. 2, 1993, New York, N.Y.), for many years a member of the famed Budapest Quartet, was especially known for the passion of his music making and for his d

  • Schneider, Adolphe (French industrialist)

    Le Creusot: …until 1836, when the brothers Adolphe and Eugène Schneider founded the Société des Forges et Ateliers du Creusot (“Creusot Forge and Workshop Company”), which produced the first French locomotives as well as armour plate.

  • Schneider, Bert (American film and television producer)

    Bob Rafelson: Early work: …of Columbia Pictures), Rafelson met Bert Schneider, with whom he formed the independent production company Raybert. Together they created the zany TV situation comedy The Monkees (1966–68), inspired by the Beatles and more particularly by Richard Lester’s Beatles films, A Hard Day’s Night (1964) and Help! (1965). Rafelson had at…

  • Schneider, David (American anthropologist)

    kinship: Culturalist accounts: The American anthropologist David Schneider’s American Kinship (1968) is generally acknowledged as one of the first important anthropological studies of kinship in a 20th-century industrialized setting. Rather than taking the ideological basis of kinship for granted or assuming it to be of less importance than strategic interests related…

  • Schneider, Eugène (French industrialist)

    Eugène Schneider, one of the great industrialists of the 19th century and a prominent figure in French politics. Schneider lost his father when quite young and, left penniless, started working in the banking house of Baron Seillière. He proved to be bright, capable, and energetic and in 1830 was

  • Schneider, Florian (German musician)

    Kraftwerk: 1946, Krefeld, West Germany) and Florian Schneider (b. 1947, Düsseldorf, West Germany—d. 2020).

  • Schneider, Hannes (Austrian skier)

    Hannes Schneider, Austrian-born ski instructor who developed what came to be called the Arlberg technique, based on the snowplow, stem, and stem Christiania turns. He helped popularize skiing in the United States. As a teenager, Schneider observed that the then favoured way of skiing, derived from

  • Schneider, Janet (American novelist)

    Janet Evanovich, American novelist known for her mystery series featuring hapless smart-mouthed New Jersey bounty hunter Stephanie Plum. Schneider was raised in a working-class family in South River, New Jersey. She studied painting at Rutgers University’s Douglass College, graduating with a

  • Schneider, Johann (German theologian)

    Johann Agricola, Lutheran Reformer, friend of Martin Luther, and advocate of antinomianism, a view asserting that Christians are freed by grace from the need to obey the Ten Commandments. At Wittenberg, Agricola was persuaded by Luther to change his course of study from medicine to theology.

  • Schneider, Joseph Eugène (French industrialist)

    Eugène Schneider, one of the great industrialists of the 19th century and a prominent figure in French politics. Schneider lost his father when quite young and, left penniless, started working in the banking house of Baron Seillière. He proved to be bright, capable, and energetic and in 1830 was

  • Schneider, Leonard Alfred (American comedian)

    Lenny Bruce, American stand-up comic and social satirist during the 1950s and early ’60s. Although public authorities increasingly denounced his performances as dirty and sick and courts across the United States tried him for obscenity, Bruce was widely esteemed by artists and intellectuals and,

  • Schneider, Maria (French actress)

    Maria Schneider, (Marie Christine Gélin), French actress (born March 27, 1952, Paris, France—died Feb. 3, 2011, Paris), gained instant international stardom at age 20 with her performance as an enigmatic young Parisian woman who enters into a passionless sexual affair with a middle-aged American

  • Schneider, Maria (American composer and conductor)

    Maria Schneider, American composer and conductor who was instrumental in revitalizing the popularity of big band music in the 21st century by enlivening modern classical arrangements with unique melodies written to the strengths of the musicians within her ensemble—works that she often referred to

  • Schneider, Maria Lynn (American composer and conductor)

    Maria Schneider, American composer and conductor who was instrumental in revitalizing the popularity of big band music in the 21st century by enlivening modern classical arrangements with unique melodies written to the strengths of the musicians within her ensemble—works that she often referred to

  • Schneider, Max (music scholar)

    Georg Philipp Telemann: Legacy: …formed, largely through studies by Max Schneider and Romain Rolland. New editions of his work have appeared, especially since the 1930s, and the interest of players, conductors, and publishers has increased.

  • Schneider, Peter (German writer)

    German literature: The 1970s and ’80s: …generational differences, brilliantly developed by Peter Schneider in Vati (1987; “Daddy”), in which a young German lawyer travels to South America to meet his father, who has fled there to escape trial for Nazi crimes (the figure of the father is modeled on the Nazi doctor Josef Mengele). Ausl?schung: ein…

  • Schneider, Romy (German actress)

    Romy Schneider, German motion-picture actress. The popular Sissi series of movies about the Austro-Hungarian royal family brought the daughter of actor Wolf Albach-Retty and 1930s film star Magda Schneider popular recognition throughout the German-speaking world in the 1950s as Elizabeth of

  • Schneider, Stephen Henry (American climatologist)

    Stephen Henry Schneider, American climatologist (born Feb. 11, 1945, New York, N.Y.—died July 19, 2010, London, Eng.), warned the world about how man-made emissions threaten the Earth’s climate by causing global warming. As an initial member (1988) of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

  • Schneider, Vreni (Swiss skier)

    Vreni Schneider, Swiss Alpine skier who was the dominant female skier of her generation and one of the greatest skiers in the history of the slalom and giant slalom events. She was the first woman to accumulate three gold medals in Alpine skiing. A shoemaker’s daughter from the tiny town of Elm in

  • Schneider, Walter (American psychologist)

    attention: Memory and habituation: Shiffrin and Walter Schneider in 1977 on the basis of experiments involving visual search. Their theory of detection, search, and attention distinguishes between two modes of processing information: controlled search and automatic detection. Controlled search is highly demanding of attentional capacity and is usually serial in nature.…

  • Schneider-Siemssen, Gunther (German opera director)

    stagecraft: Projections and special effects: …Wagner’s music dramas designed by Gunther Schneider-Siemssen elaborated this concept to achieve even more dramatic and sumptuous effects; Schneider-Siemssen filled the vast, extra-wide stage with patterns of light in depth, softened with scrims (loosely woven meshes that diffuse the light) and translucent drops (backdrops with sections dyed to transmit some…

  • Schneiderman v. United States (law case)

    Wiley B. Rutledge, Jr.: …to salute the flag, and Schneiderman v. United States, the case of a California resident whose naturalization had been revoked because of his communist beliefs. In both cases he voted with the court’s liberal bloc.

  • Schneifel (region, Germany)

    Eifel: …plateau falls into three sections: Schneifel or Schnee-Eifel, Hocheifel, and Voreifel. In the Schneifel (German: “Snow Eifel”), near the Belgian frontier, scrub and forest are common, with cultivation only on the richer soils. The Hocheifel (“High Eifel”), which includes the highest point in the plateau, Hohe Acht (2,451 feet [747…

  • Schneirla, Theodore Christian (American animal psychologist)

    Theodore Christian Schneirla, American animal psychologist who performed some of the first studies on the behaviour patterns of army ants. Schneirla was educated at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (M.S., 1925; Sc.D., 1928), and joined the staff of New York University in 1928. He made the

  • Schnellbahn (railway, Berlin, Germany)

    Berlin: Transportation: …the Stadt- or Schnellbahn (S-Bahn), a largely elevated and partly underground railway system, began in 1871, and building of the subway, or Untergrundbahn (U-Bahn), was initiated in 1897. By World War II the city had one of the finest rapid transit systems in Europe. After the erection of the…

  • Schnellen (German tankard)

    pottery: Stoneware: …on tall, tapering tankards (Schnellen), which were provided with pewter or silver mounts. The Doppelfrieskrüge were jugs with two molded friezes (usually portraying classical subjects) around the middle. They and the tankards were made in Raeren brownware by Jan Emens, surnamed Mennicken, in the last quarter of the 16th…

  • Schnitger, Arp (German organ maker)

    Arp Schnitger, one of the most skilled organ builders of the Baroque era, whose fine instruments inspired composers such as Johann Sebastian Bach. Schnitger was born into a family of woodworkers; his father was a carver, and Arp was apprenticed to a cousin at age 18. Three years after his cousin’s

  • Schnitter, Johann (German theologian)

    Johann Agricola, Lutheran Reformer, friend of Martin Luther, and advocate of antinomianism, a view asserting that Christians are freed by grace from the need to obey the Ten Commandments. At Wittenberg, Agricola was persuaded by Luther to change his course of study from medicine to theology.

  • Schnittke, Alfred (Russian composer)

    Alfred Schnittke, postmodernist Russian composer who created serious, dark-toned musical works characterized by abrupt juxtapositions of radically different, often contradictory, styles, an approach that came to be known as “polystylism.” Schnittke’s father was a Jewish journalist who had been born

  • schnitzel (food)

    Chicken-fried steak: …who adapted the dish from wiener schnitzel, which is similarly cooked but uses veal and breadcrumbs.

  • Schnitzer, Eduard (German explorer)

    Mehmed Emin Pasha, physician, explorer, and governor of the Equatorial province of Egyptian Sudan who contributed vastly to the knowledge of African geography, natural history, ethnology, and languages. In 1865 Schnitzer became a medical officer in the Turkish army and used his leisure to begin

  • Schnitzler, Arthur (Austrian author)

    Arthur Schnitzler, Austrian playwright and novelist known for his psychological dramas that dissect turn-of-the-century Viennese bourgeois life. Schnitzler, the son of a well-known Jewish physician, took a medical degree and practiced medicine for much of his life, interesting himself particularly

  • Schnitzler, Karl-Eduard von (German broadcaster)

    Karl-Eduard von Schnitzler, East German broadcaster and propagandist (born April 28, 1918, Berlin, Ger.—died Sept. 20, 2001, Berlin), produced Der schwarze Kanal (“The Black Channel”), a 20-minute weekly television program in which he denounced “Western imperialism” in general and West Germany in p

  • Schnoorviertel (district, Bremen, Germany)

    Bremen: Geography: …Old Town, especially in the Schnoorviertel, a district that was restored to its original 16th- and 17th-century appearance during the post-World War II reconstruction. Parks, located all over the city, offer a relaxing contrast to Bremen’s often hectic pace. The best known are the Bürgerpark, with its famous rhododendron gardens,…

  • Schnorr von Carolsfeld, Julius (German painter)

    Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld, painter and designer who figured importantly in the German Nazarene movement. Schnorr received his earliest instruction from his father, Hans Veit Schnorr, a draftsman, engraver, and painter, and in 1818 he went to Rome where he was associated with a group of painters

  • Schnorr von Carolsfeld, Ludwig (German opera singer)

    Ludwig Schnorr von Carolsfeld, German tenor, known for his Wagnerian roles. Schnorr made his first solo appearance in 1855 with the Karlsruhe Opera. He married the singer Malvina Garrigues and moved to Dresden in 1860, where he established himself as a singer in lieder and oratorio as well as

  • Schnoz, The (American comedian)

    Jimmy Durante, American comedian whose career in every major entertainment performance medium spanned more than six decades. As a boy, Durante wanted to become a saloon pianist. His father, a barber, bought him a piano and provided intermittent lessons. Although Durante left school in seventh grade

  • Schnozzola (American comedian)

    Jimmy Durante, American comedian whose career in every major entertainment performance medium spanned more than six decades. As a boy, Durante wanted to become a saloon pianist. His father, a barber, bought him a piano and provided intermittent lessons. Although Durante left school in seventh grade

  • Schober, Franz von (friend of Schubert)

    Franz Schubert: Early life and career: …induced the young and brilliant Franz von Schober to visit Schubert. Late in 1815 Schober went to the schoolhouse in the S?ulengasse, found Schubert in front of a class with his manuscripts piled about him, and inflamed the young composer, a willing listener, with a desire to break free from…

  • Schober, Johann (prime minister of Austria)

    Johann Schober, police official who was twice prime minister of Austria (1921–22 and 1929–30). He established friendly relations with the Czechoslovak republic but was unable to negotiate a union between Austria and Germany. Schober entered the imperial Austrian police service as a young man and

  • Schoeck, Othmar (Swiss composer)

    Othmar Schoeck, Swiss musician, one of the principal composers of lieder of his time. Schoeck studied at Zürich and in 1907 with Max Reger in Leipzig. On his return to Zürich he conducted choral societies until 1917. From 1917 to 1944 he was conductor of the symphony concerts at Sankt Gallen. His

  • Schoedsack, Ernest B. (American director)

    Ernest B. Schoedsack, American film director who made only a few movies, most in collaboration with producer-director Merian C. Cooper, of which the most notable was King Kong (1933). Schoedsack ran away from home in his teens and eventually found work as a surveyor in San Francisco. His brother

  • Schoedsack, Ernest Beaumont (American director)

    Ernest B. Schoedsack, American film director who made only a few movies, most in collaboration with producer-director Merian C. Cooper, of which the most notable was King Kong (1933). Schoedsack ran away from home in his teens and eventually found work as a surveyor in San Francisco. His brother

  • Schoelcher, Victor (French journalist)

    Victor Schoelcher, French journalist and politician who was France’s greatest advocate of ending slavery in the empire. Although born into a wealthy porcelain-manufacturing family, Schoelcher showed little inclination for a business career. After a trip to the United States in 1829, where he was

  • Schoenbein, Christian (German chemist)

    Christian Friedrich Sch?nbein, German chemist who discovered and named ozone (1840) and was the first to describe guncotton (nitrocellulose). His teaching posts included one at Epsom, Eng., before he joined the faculty at the University of Basel, Switz. (1828), where he was appointed professor of

  • Schoenberg, Albert (American actor)

    Gallagher and Shean: …the act of “Gallagher and Shean.” They went separate ways from 1914 to 1920, but in the latter year (at the urging of Shean’s sister Minnie Marx, mother of the Marx Brothers) they rejoined to star in the Shubert Brothers’ Cinderella on Broadway, with huge success. They then appeared in…

  • Schoenberg, Arnold (American composer)

    Arnold Schoenberg, Austrian-American composer who created new methods of musical composition involving atonality, namely serialism and the 12-tone row. He was also one of the most-influential teachers of the 20th century; among his most-significant pupils were Alban Berg and Anton Webern.

  • Schoenberg, Arnold Franz Walter (American composer)

    Arnold Schoenberg, Austrian-American composer who created new methods of musical composition involving atonality, namely serialism and the 12-tone row. He was also one of the most-influential teachers of the 20th century; among his most-significant pupils were Alban Berg and Anton Webern.

  • Schoendoerffer, Pierre (French photojournalist, writer, and filmmaker)

    Pierre Schoendoerffer, French photojournalist, writer, and filmmaker (born May 5, 1928, Chamalières, France—died March 14, 2012, Clamart, near Paris, France), crafted realistic hard-hitting war movies that were inspired by his own experiences during the First Indochina War as a photojournalist

  • Schoenefeldia (plant genus)

    grassland: Biota: >Schoenefeldia. Other species, which are highly palatable to grazing animals, are now restricted to rocky sites that offer some protection; these species may have once been far more widespread and important. In many places where shrubs and small trees occur the vegetation would be called…

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