You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Scott-James, Anne Eleanor (British journalist and writer)

    Anne Scott-James, (Anne Eleanor Scott-James; Lady Lancaster), British journalist and writer (born April 5, 1913, London, Eng.—died May 13, 2009, Berkshire, Eng.), defied gender roles as one of the first female career journalists and columnists on Fleet Street, the hub of the British press until the

  • Scott-Moncrieff Commission (Indian history)

    Scott-Moncrieff Commission, delegation appointed in 1901 by George Nathaniel Curzon, the British viceroy of India, to draw up a comprehensive irrigation plan for India. This was a result of Lord Curzon’s observation of famine conditions soon after his arrival in 1899. The commission was named for

  • Scottie (breed of dog)

    Scottish terrier, short-legged terrier breed often held by its admirers to be the oldest of the Highland terriers, although this contention has not been proved. A small, squat, bewhiskered dog with wide-set, alert-looking eyes, short legs, and a distinctive rolling gait, the Scottie has a hard,

  • Scottish (people)

    Scotland: Ethnic groups: …basis for a rich unified Scottish culture; the people of Shetland and Orkney have tended to remain apart from both of these elements and to look to Scandinavia as the mirror of their Norse heritage. Important immigrant groups have arrived, most notably Irish labourers; there have also been significant groups…

  • Scottish bluebell (plant)

    Harebell, (Campanula rotundifolia), widespread, slender-stemmed perennial of the family Campanulaceae. The harebell bears nodding blue bell-like flowers. It is native to woods, meadows, and cliffsides of northern Eurasia and North America and of mountains farther south. There are more than 30 named

  • Scottish Borders (council area, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Scottish Borders, council area, southeastern Scotland, its location along the English border roughly coinciding with the drainage basin of the River Tweed. Its rounded hills and undulating plateaus—including the Lammermuir Hills, the Moorfoot Hills, the Tweedsmuir Hills, and the Cheviot Hills—form

  • Scottish Chapbook (Scottish publication)

    Hugh MacDiarmid: …1922 he founded the monthly Scottish Chapbook, in which he advocated a Scottish literary revival and published the lyrics of “Hugh MacDiarmid,” later collected as Sangschaw (1925) and Penny Wheep (1926). Rejecting English as a medium for Scottish poetry, MacDiarmid scrutinized the pretensions and hypocrisies of modern society in verse…

  • Scottish Chaucerian (Scottish literature)

    Makar, any of the Scottish courtly poets who flourished from about 1425 to 1550. The best known are Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas, and Sir David Lyndsay; the group is sometimes expanded to include James I of Scotland and Harry the Minstrel, or Blind Harry. Because Geoffrey Chaucer

  • Scottish Church College (college, Kolkata, India)

    India: Cultural effects: …college, along with Alexander Duff’s Scottish Church College, also in Calcutta, became a centre of Western influence and saw the rise of the Young Bengal movement, the Westernizing zeal of which denied the Hindu religion itself.

  • Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party (political party, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Scotland: Political process: …known in Scotland as the Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party) and Labour parties, but thereafter into the early 21st century the Labour Party dominated Scottish politics. Indeed, at the 1997 national election the Conservative Party returned no members to the House of Commons. From Keir Hardie, who cofounded the Independent…

  • Scottish deerhound (breed of dog)

    Scottish deerhound, dog breed called the “royal dog of Scotland,” known since the 16th century. It was once the exclusive property of the nobility, who prized it as a hunter of the Scottish stag. Like the greyhound in build but larger and more heavily boned, the Scottish deerhound stands 28 to 32

  • Scottish Enlightenment (British history)

    Scottish Enlightenment, the conjunction of minds, ideas, and publications in Scotland during the whole of the second half of the 18th century and extending over several decades on either side of that period. Contemporaries referred to Edinburgh as a “hotbed of genius.” Voltaire in 1762 wrote in

  • Scottish Fielde (English poem)

    alliterative verse: …usually held to be “Scottish Fielde,” which deals with the Battle of Flodden (1513).

  • Scottish fold cat (breed of cat)

    Scottish fold cat, Breed of domestic cat with ears that fold forward and down. A Scottish shepherd discovered the foundation cat—Susie, a white barn cat—in 1961. Scottish folds may be longhaired or shorthaired and of various colours and patterns. Susie’s fold was caused by a genetic mutation that

  • Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council (Scottish organization)

    Scotland: Education: The Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council (formed in 2005 from the amalgamation of the Scottish Higher Education Funding Council and the Scottish Further Education Funding Council) plays a key role in allocating funds to institutions in these sectors.

  • Scottish Gaelic language

    Scots Gaelic language, a member of the Goidelic group of Celtic languages, spoken along the northwest coast of Scotland and in the Hebrides islands. Australia, the United States, and Canada (particularly Nova Scotia) are also home to Scots Gaelic communities. Scots Gaelic is a recent offshoot of

  • Scottish Gaelic literature

    Celtic literature: Scottish Gaelic: The earliest extant Scottish Gaelic writing consists of marginalia added in the 12th century to the Latin Gospels contained in the 9th-century Book of Deer. The most important early Gaelic literary manuscript is The Book of the Dean…

  • Scottish Highland bagpipe (musical instrument)

    bagpipe: The Scottish Highland bagpipe has two tenor drones and a bass drone, tuned an octave apart; its scale preserves traditional intervals foreign to European classical music. It was once, like other bagpipes, a pastoral and festive instrument; its military use with drums dates from the 18th…

  • Scottish Highlands (region, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Scottish Highlands, major physiographic and cultural division of Scotland, lying northwest of a line drawn from Dumbarton, near the head of the Firth of Clyde on the western coast, to Stonehaven, on the eastern coast. The western offshore islands of the Inner and Outer Hebrides and Arran and Bute

  • Scottish Historie of James the fourth, slaine at Flodden, The (work by Greene)

    Robert Greene: In The Scottish Historie of James the fourth, slaine at Flodden (written c. 1590, published 1598) he used an Italian tale but drew on fairy lore for the characters of Oberon and Bohan. It was a forerunner of As You Like It and A Midsummer Night’s Dream.…

  • Scottish Land Court (Scottish law)

    Scottish law: Courts of law: The Scottish Land Court, established in 1911, has jurisdiction in a wide range of matters relating to agriculture. Disputes between landlords and tenants of agricultural holdings may be brought before it by judicial process or, by agreement of the parties, in lieu of arbitration. It also…

  • Scottish law

    Scottish law, the legal practices and institutions of Scotland. At the union of the parliaments of England and Scotland in 1707, the legal systems of the two countries were very dissimilar. Scotland, mainly in the preceding century, had adopted as a guide much of the Roman law that had been

  • Scottish literature

    Scottish literature, the body of writings produced by inhabitants of Scotland that includes works in Scots Gaelic, Scots (Lowland Scots), and English. This article focuses on literature in Scots and in English; see English literature for additional discussion of some works in English. For a

  • Scottish Lowland bagpipe (musical instrument)

    bagpipe: The Scottish Lowland bagpipe, played from about 1750 to about 1850, was bellows-blown, with three drones in one stock, and had a softer sound. Akin to this were the two-droned bagpipes played up to the 18th century in Germany, the Netherlands, Ireland, and England. The modern…

  • Scottish Lowlands (region, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Lowlands, cultural and historical region of Scotland, comprising the portion of the country southeast of a line drawn from Dumbarton to Stonehaven; northwest of the line are the Highlands. Traditionally, the Lowlands were distinguished by the use of the Scots language (considered a dialect or close

  • Scottish National Antarctic Expedition (Scottish expedition)

    Scotia Sea: Named after the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition (1902–1904) vessel Scotia, under the command of William S. Bruce, the Scotia Sea has a lengthy record of exploration dating back to the 17th century. Through the 18th and 19th centuries, exploration was encouraged by a relentless search for new and…

  • Scottish National Dictionary (Scottish dictionary)

    Scottish National Dictionary, dictionary published in Edinburgh and containing all Scottish words known to be in use since about 1700. It is designed partly on regional lines and partly on historical principles. Work commenced on this 10-volume set in 1931 and reached completion in 1976. A

  • Scottish National Party (political party, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Scottish National Party (SNP), nationalist political party that has sought to make Scotland an independent state within the European Union (EU). The SNP was formed in 1934 from a union of the National Party of Scotland (founded in 1928) and the Scottish Party (1932). From the beginning,

  • Scottish National Zoological Park and Carnegie Aquarium (zoo, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Scottish National Zoological Park and Carnegie Aquarium, collection of terrestrial and aquatic animals founded in 1913 by the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland in Edinburgh. More than 1,190 specimens of over 150 species are exhibited on the 75-acre (30-hectare) grounds. Included in the

  • Scottish Parliament (government, United Kingdom)

    United Kingdom: London’s local government, House of Lords reform, and devolution for Scotland and Wales: …Assembly for Wales and the Scottish Parliament were established in 1999 and granted powers previously reserved for the central government. Yet, with the exception of political devolution to the component states of the United Kingdom, the Labour Party remained reluctant to reform the constitution, so that at the beginning of…

  • Scottish reel (dance)

    reel: Scottish reels are mentioned as early as the 16th century. Except in the Scottish Highlands, they disappeared under the influence of the Presbyterian church in the 17th century; they reappeared in the Scottish Lowlands after 1700. The Irish reel, or cor, is distinguished by more…

  • Scottish renaissance (Scottish literary movement)

    Hugh MacDiarmid: 9, 1978, Edinburgh), preeminent Scottish poet of the first half of the 20th century and leader of the Scottish literary renaissance.

  • Scottish Symphony (work by Mendelssohn)

    symphony: Mendelssohn: 3 (Scottish) and Symphony No. 4 (Italian), both in A major–minor. The Scottish (also called Scotch), completed in 1842, although not programmatic, is expressive of Mendelssohn’s poetic nature. Its beginning was sketched during a visit to Scotland in 1829. In structure the work consists of four…

  • Scottish Tartans Authority (Scottish heritage organization)

    tartan: The Scottish Tartans Authority, headquartered in Crieff, Perthshire, Scot., was founded in 1996 to advance and promote the education of the public about Scottish tartans. The organization maintains the International Tartan Index with a database of more than 4,000 tartans. Within the United States, the Scottish…

  • Scottish terrier (breed of dog)

    Scottish terrier, short-legged terrier breed often held by its admirers to be the oldest of the Highland terriers, although this contention has not been proved. A small, squat, bewhiskered dog with wide-set, alert-looking eyes, short legs, and a distinctive rolling gait, the Scottie has a hard,

  • Scottland, Bee (boxer)

    boxing: Professional boxing: The death of light-heavyweight fighter Beethavean (Bee) Scottland after a nationally televised bout in July 2001 renewed the call for greater safety measures for boxers.

  • Scottland, Beethavean (boxer)

    boxing: Professional boxing: The death of light-heavyweight fighter Beethavean (Bee) Scottland after a nationally televised bout in July 2001 renewed the call for greater safety measures for boxers.

  • Scotts Bluff National Monument (monument, Scottsbluff, Nebraska, United States)

    Scotts Bluff National Monument, geologic formation and natural area in Scotts Bluff county, western Nebraska, U.S. It lies along the North Platte River, opposite the city of Scottsbluff. The 5-square-mile (13-square-km) area of the monument was established in 1919. The focus of the monument is a

  • Scottsboro (Alabama, United States)

    Scottsboro, city, seat (1859) of Jackson county, northeastern Alabama, U.S. It is situated near the Tennessee River at the edge of the Cumberland Plateau, about 40 miles (65 km) east of Huntsville. The Cherokee and Creek living in the area were forced out in 1838, and the city was named for Robert

  • Scottsboro case (law case)

    Scottsboro case, major U.S. civil rights controversy of the 1930s surrounding the prosecution in Scottsboro, Alabama, of nine black youths charged with the rape of two white women. The nine, after nearly being lynched, were brought to trial in Scottsboro in April 1931, just three weeks after their

  • Scottsdale (Arizona, United States)

    Scottsdale, city, Maricopa county, residential-resort suburb of Phoenix, south-central Arizona, U.S. Its business district (in a Western frontier motif) is an arts and crafts centre and features Arizona-oriented fashions alongside the latest offerings from Milan and Paris. The city is traversed by

  • Scotty’s Castle (building, Death Valley, California, United States)

    Death Valley: Death Valley National Park: Other attractions include Scotty’s Castle, a mansion built in the 1920s by Chicago businessman Albert Johnson and named for his prospector friend Walter Scott, a spinner of tall tales known as “Death Valley Scotty.” Artist’s Drive is an 8-mile (13-km) loop through colourful mountains and canyons. Jagged pinnacles…

  • SCOTUS (highest court, United States)

    Supreme Court of the United States, final court of appeal and final expositor of the Constitution of the United States. Within the framework of litigation, the Supreme Court marks the boundaries of authority between state and nation, state and state, and government and citizen. The Supreme Court

  • Scotus, Joannes Duns (Scottish philosopher and theologian)

    Blessed John Duns Scotus, ; beatified March 20, 1993), influential Franciscan realist philosopher and scholastic theologian who pioneered the classical defense of the doctrine that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was conceived without original sin (the Immaculate Conception). He also argued that the

  • Scotus, Johannes (Irish philosopher)

    John Scotus Erigena, theologian, translator, and commentator on several earlier authors in works centring on the integration of Greek and Neoplatonist philosophy with Christian belief. From about 845, Erigena lived at the court of the West Frankish king Charles II the Bald, near Laon (now in

  • Scotus, Marianus (Irish historian)

    Marianus Scotus, chronicler who wrote a universal history of the world from creation to 1082 that disputed the chronology of the Paschal calendar formulated by Dionysius Exiguus, a 6th-century theologian. Marianus’ Chronicon, written in Germany, maintains that the Paschal calendar dated Christ’s b

  • Scoundrel, The (film by Hecht and MacArthur [1935])
  • Scourge, a Monthly Expositor of Imposture and Folly, The (British periodical)

    George Cruikshank: …he created for the periodical The Scourge, a Monthly Expositor of Imposture and Folly. This publication lasted until 1816, during which time Cruikshank came to rival James Gillray, the leading English caricaturist of the preceding generation. For the next 10 years Cruikshank satirized with fine irreverence the political policies of…

  • Scourian Complex (geology)

    Precambrian: Structure and occurrence of granulite-gneiss belts: …Ocean, was contiguous with the Scourian Complex of northwestern Scotland, the central part of Greenland, and the coast of Labrador; the Aldan and Ukrainian shields of continental Europe; the North China craton; large parts of the Superior province of Canada; the Yilgarn block in

  • scouring rush (plant genus)

    Horsetail, (genus Equisetum), fifteen species of rushlike conspicuously jointed perennial herbs, the only living genus of plants in the order Equisetales and the class Equisetopsida. Horsetails grow in moist, rich soils in all parts of the world except Australasia. Some species produce two kinds of

  • scouse (dialect)

    Merseyside: …a distinctive local dialect (“scouse”) also provide the region with a strong identity. Area 249 square miles (645 square km). Pop. (2001) 1,362,026; (2011) 1,381,189.

  • scout cruiser (ship)

    naval ship: Cruisers: …cruiser spectrum were small, fast “scout” cruisers used for reconnaissance and escort duties. These ships displaced from 3,000 to 7,000 tons and, by 1915, attained speeds as high as 30 knots. They were armed with guns of smaller calibre, usually six or 7.5 inches. The British built many of this…

  • scout plane (aircraft)

    fighter aircraft: …I they were used as scout planes for artillery spotting, but it was quickly discovered that they could be armed and do combat with one another, shoot down enemy bombers, and conduct other tactical missions. Since that time fighters have assumed various specialized combat roles. An interceptor is a fighter…

  • scouting (warfare)

    naval warfare: The study of trends: Second is the scouting process, which gathers information by reconnaissance, surveillance, cryptanalysis, and other means and delivers it to the tactical commander. Third is command itself—or command and control (C2) in modern parlance—which assimilates the information, decides which actions are called for, and directs forces to act accordingly.

  • Scouting for Boys (work by Baden-Powell)

    Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell: …and for their use Baden-Powell’s Scouting for Boys was issued in 1908. He retired from the army in 1910 to devote all his time to the Boy Scouts, and in the same year he and his sister Agnes Baden-Powell (1858–1945) founded the Girl Guides. His wife, Olave, Lady Baden-Powell (1889–1977),…

  • Scouts (youth organization)

    Boy Scouts, organization, originally for boys from 11 to 14 or 15 years of age, that aimed to develop in them good citizenship, chivalrous behaviour, and skill in various outdoor activities. The Boy Scout movement was founded in Great Britain in 1908 by a cavalry officer, Lieutenant General Robert

  • Scouts of the Prairie, The (Wild West show)

    Buffalo Bill: The Wild West show: …to star in Buntline’s drama The Scouts of the Prairie. Though his acting was far from polished, he became a superb showman, and his audiences greeted him with overwhelming enthusiasm during his 45-year career as an entertainer.

  • scove (industry)

    brick and tile: Firing and cooling: …earliest type of kiln, the scove, is merely a pile of dried bricks with tunnels at the bottom allowing heat from fires to pass through and upward in the pile of bricks. The walls and top are plastered with a mixture of sand, clay, and water to retain the heat;…

  • Scozzafava, Dede (American politician)

    Tea Party movement: Origins of the Tea Party: …Doug Hoffman, forcing Republican candidate Dierdre Scozzafava from the race just days before the election. This tactic backfired, however, and the seat went to Democrat Bill Owens; Owens was the first Democrat to represent the district since the 19th century. The Tea Party fared better in Massachusetts in January 2010,…

  • Scozzafava, Dierdre (American politician)

    Tea Party movement: Origins of the Tea Party: …Doug Hoffman, forcing Republican candidate Dierdre Scozzafava from the race just days before the election. This tactic backfired, however, and the seat went to Democrat Bill Owens; Owens was the first Democrat to represent the district since the 19th century. The Tea Party fared better in Massachusetts in January 2010,…

  • SCR (electronics)

    stagecraft: Dimmers: …control paved the way for silicon-controlled rectifier (SCR) dimmers.

  • SCR-270 (radar)

    radar: First military radars: …controlling antiaircraft gunfire and the SCR-270 (at a frequency of 100 MHz) for detecting aircraft. Both of these radars were available at the start of World War II, as was the navy’s CXAM shipboard surveillance radar (at a frequency of 200 MHz). It was an SCR-270, one of six available…

  • SCR-584 (radar)

    radar: Advances during World War II: …MIT Radiation Laboratory was the SCR-584, a widely used gunfire-control system. It employed conical scan tracking—in which a single offset (squinted) radar beam is continuously rotated about the radar antenna’s central axis—and, with its four-degree beamwidth, it had sufficient angular accuracy to place antiaircraft guns on target without the need…

  • Scrabble (board game)

    Scrabble, board-and-tile game in which two to four players compete in forming words with lettered tiles on a 225-square board; words spelled out by letters on the tiles interlock like words in a crossword puzzle. Players draw seven tiles from a pool at the start and replenish their supply after

  • scramble competition polygyny (animal behaviour)

    animal social behaviour: Social interactions involving sex: Scramble competition polygyny is thought to occur when neither female-attracting resources nor females themselves are economically defendable. Scramble competition polygyny involves males competing for access to mates based on differences in their ability to move about and locate females. Finally, in lekking species, males aggregate…

  • Scrambles Amongst the Alps (work by Whymper)

    Edward Whymper: …event is recorded in Whymper’s Scrambles Amongst the Alps (1871; condensed as Ascent of the Matterhorn, 1879), which is illustrated with his own engravings. The book contains Whymper’s famous words of caution:

  • scramjet

    jet engine: Ramjets and supersonic combustion ramjets: Such specialized ramjets are called scramjets (for supersonic combustion ramjets) and are projected to be fueled by a cryogenically liquified gas (e.g., hydrogen or methane) instead of a liquid hydrocarbon. The primary reason for doing so is to exploit the greater heat release per unit weight of fuels that have…

  • Scranton (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Scranton, city, seat (1878) of Lackawanna county, northeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., in the Lackawanna River valley, on the western fringes of the Pocono Mountains. It is the centre of an urbanized industrial complex that includes Carbondale and Wilkes-Barre. The area was inhabited by

  • Scranton, William (American politician)

    United States presidential election of 1964: The campaign: …three-fifths of rank-and-file Republicans favoured William Scranton, governor of Pennsylvania, for the party nomination.

  • Scrantonia (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Scranton, city, seat (1878) of Lackawanna county, northeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., in the Lackawanna River valley, on the western fringes of the Pocono Mountains. It is the centre of an urbanized industrial complex that includes Carbondale and Wilkes-Barre. The area was inhabited by

  • Scrap Book (American magazine)

    history of publishing: Reader’s Digest magazine: …world affairs; and Frank Munsey’s Scrap Book (1906–12), “a granary for the gleanings of literature.” The Literary Digest, in particular, with a circulation of more than 1,000,000 in the early 1920s, was something of an American institution. Its famous straw votes successfully predicted the result of the presidential elections after…

  • scrap metal

    Scrap metal, used metals that are an important source of industrial metals and alloys, particularly in the production of steel, copper, lead, aluminum, and zinc. Smaller amounts of tin, nickel, magnesium, and precious metals are also recovered from scrap. Impurities consisting of such organic

  • Scrap of Paper, A (play by Sardou)

    Victorien Sardou: …Les Pattes de mouche (1860; A Scrap of Paper) is a model of the well-made play. He relied heavily on theatrical devices to create an illusion of life, and this largely accounts for his rapid decline in popularity. Madame Sans-Gêne, his last success, is still performed. His initial successes he…

  • scraped-surface heat exchanger

    food preservation: Commercial sterility: …solid particles are heated in scraped-surface heat exchangers. These heat exchangers use blades to continuously scrape the inside surface of the heating chamber. The scraping action protects highly viscous foods from being burned on the heating surface.

  • scraper (printing)

    printing: Rotogravure: …blade of soft steel, the scraper, or doctor blade, which moves slowly to and fro lengthwise. By rubbing against the cylinder with a precisely regulated degree of pressure, it causes the excess ink to drop off before the cylinder moves over the paper.

  • scraper (musical instrument)

    Scraper, in music, percussion instrument consisting of a serrated surface that is rasped with a stick. Known since the Stone Age, it is often associated with magical powers and ritual, and it is widely distributed geographically. Scrapers are commonly made of bone, as the Aztec used in memorial

  • scraper (construction)

    Scraper, in engineering, machine for moving earth over short distances (up to about two miles) over relatively smooth areas. Either self-propelled or towed, it consists of a wagon with a gate having a bladed bottom. The blade scrapes up earth as the wagon pushes forward and forces the excavated

  • scraper (zoology)

    coleopteran: Sound production: …part of the body (a scraper) against another part (the file). These stridulating organs are generally present in both sexes and probably serve for mutual sex calling. Some beetles have a filelike area on the head that is rasped by the front margin of the prothorax. Among the cerambycids, sound…

  • scraper dredge (engineering)

    dredge: The scraper dredge, also called a dragline, handles material with a scoop suspended from a swinging boom. The scoop is drawn forward by a line attached to the front, while a second line attached to the rear holds the scoop at the proper angle to slice…

  • scraper tool (primitive hand tool)

    hand tool: The Mousterian flake tools: …kinds of flakes, points and scrapers. The former are roughly triangular, with two trimmed or sharp edges meeting in a point, the base or butt of the triangle being thick and blunt. The side scrapers have a sharp edge in the long direction of the flake, with an opposite, thicker…

  • scraperboard (art tool)

    Scratchboard, a technique used by commercial artists and illustrators to make drawings that can easily be reproduced and that closely resemble either wood engravings or woodcuts. Introduced in the 19th century, the process involves the use of a specially prepared board coated with a ground of

  • scrapie (sheep and goat disease)

    Scrapie, fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. Scrapie has been endemic in British sheep, particularly the Suffolk breed, since the early 18th century. Since that time the disease has been detected in countries worldwide, with the exception of Australia and New Zealand, as well as in

  • Scraptiidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Scraptiidae About 200 species widely distributed; associated with rotten wood, fungi; example Scraptia. Family Stenotrachelidae Found in East Asia, North America. Family Tenebrionidae (darkling beetles) Varied group; mostly

  • scratch reflex (physiology)

    itching: Scratching may temporarily relieve itching by interrupting the rhythm of nerve impulses or by inflicting transitory damage to the nerves. Persistent scratching produces redness, papules, and crusting of the skin.

  • scratch spin (ice skating)

    figure skating: Spins: A scratch spin is done in an upright position, and, depending on which foot the skater is spinning on, the spin can be done on either a back inside or a back outside edge, with the toe pick occasionally scratching the surface of the ice for…

  • scratchboard (art tool)

    Scratchboard, a technique used by commercial artists and illustrators to make drawings that can easily be reproduced and that closely resemble either wood engravings or woodcuts. Introduced in the 19th century, the process involves the use of a specially prepared board coated with a ground of

  • scratching (physiology)

    itching: Scratching may temporarily relieve itching by interrupting the rhythm of nerve impulses or by inflicting transitory damage to the nerves. Persistent scratching produces redness, papules, and crusting of the skin.

  • scratching (music)

    Sugar Hill Records: “Rapper's Delight”: …showcased the new sound of scratching (created by manually moving a record back and forth under the record player’s needle); and “The Message” (1982) by Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, a heartfelt account of life in the ghetto, showed the potential of hip-hop for conveying social comment.

  • scrawled filefish (fish)

    filefish: The scrawled filefish (Aluterus scriptus) of worldwide distribution may grow about 100 cm (40 inches) long, but most filefishes are considerably smaller. The members of this family are not generally considered good to eat.

  • SCRD (American organization)

    infant and toddler development: In 1933 the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) was established in the United States to apply new concepts in child development to improving the lives of the country’s children. The society initially focused on understanding how poverty and social deprivation affected development, with the aim of…

  • Scream (film by Craven [1996])

    Wes Craven: …repeat that earlier success until Scream (1996). A blockbuster hit, it was known for its dark wit and references to other horror movies as well as for a notable cast that included Drew Barrymore, Courteney Cox, Neve Campbell, and David Arquette. The film was followed by three sequels (1997, 2000,…

  • Scream (album by Osbourne)

    Ozzy Osbourne: …Rain, and he followed with Scream (2010).

  • Scream 2 (film by Craven [1997])

    Wes Craven: …followed by three sequels (1997, 2000, and 2011) that had varying degrees of success at the box office.

  • Scream, The (work by Munch)

    Edvard Munch: Paintings of love and death: …dramatic perspective is used in The Scream, which is Munch’s most famous work. Inspired by a hallucinatory experience in which Munch felt and heard a “scream throughout nature,” it depicts a panic-stricken creature, simultaneously corpselike and reminiscent of a sperm or fetus, whose contours are echoed in the swirling lines…

  • screamer (bird family)

    Screamer, any of three species of South American waterfowl constituting the family Anhimidae (order Anseriformes). The group derives its name from its raucous, far-carrying cry. Screamers are birds 75 cm (30 inches) high that inhabit marshes, where they feed gregariously on water plants and make

  • Screaming Meemie (rocket)

    rocket and missile system: Barrage rockets: The 150-millimetre Nebelwerfer, a towed, six-tube launcher, was particularly respected by U.S. and British troops, to whom it was known as the “Screaming Meemie” or “Moaning Minnie” for the eerie sound made by the incoming rockets. Maximum range was more than 6,000 yards (5,500 metres).

  • scree (landform)

    valley: Hillslopes: Talus slopes are a type in which debris piles up to a characteristic angle of repose. When new debris is added to the slope, thereby locally increasing the angle, the slope adjusts by movement of the debris to reestablish the angle. Again, the result is…

  • screech owl (bird)

    Screech owl, any of numerous New World owls of the genus Otus, typical owls of the family Strigidae. Old World species of Otus are known as scops owls. Members of both groups possess a facial disk and ear tufts. Coloured in a concealing bark pattern, they are rather small owls, about 20 to 30 cm (8

  • screen (printing process)

    photoengraving: The halftone process: …produced by photography through a screen of loosely woven fabric. The screen was placed some distance forward of the plane of the receiving photographic surface (film or plate) and had the effect of breaking the gray tones of the subject into dots of varying sizes, through a combination of geometric…

  • screen (basketball)

    basketball: Screen, or pick: Legal action of a player who, without causing more than incidental contact, delays or prevents an opponent from reaching his desired position.

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载