You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • search and retrieval (computing)

    information processing: Information searching and retrieval: State-of-the-art approaches to retrieving information employ two generic techniques: (1) matching words in the query against the database index (key-word searching) and (2) traversing the database with the aid of hypertext or hypermedia links.

  • search and seizure (law)

    Search and seizure, practices engaged in by law enforcement officers in order to gain sufficient evidence to ensure the arrest and conviction of an offender. The latitude allowed police and other law enforcement agents in carrying out searches and seizures varies considerably from country to

  • search engine

    Search engine, computer program to find answers to queries in a collection of information, which might be a library catalog or a database but is most commonly the World Wide Web. A Web search engine produces a list of “pages”—computer files listed on the Web—that contain the terms in a query. Most

  • Search for a Method (work by Sartre)

    Jean-Paul Sartre: Political activities: title, Search for a Method). Sartre set out to examine critically the Marxist dialectic and discovered that it was not livable in the Soviet form. Although he still believed that Marxism was the only philosophy for the current times, he conceded that it had become ossified…

  • Search for Earth-like Exoplanets, The

    Early in 2014 NASA scientists took a significant step toward answering a question that people had wondered about for centuries: Are there worlds out there in space that can harbour life as we know it? On April 17 NASA officially announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, the first Earth-sized

  • Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (scientific project)

    SETI, ongoing effort to seek intelligent extraterrestrial life. SETI focuses on receiving and analyzing signals from space, particularly in the radio and visible-light regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, looking for nonrandom patterns likely to have been sent either deliberately or

  • Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, The (work by Tomlin and Wagner)

    Lily Tomlin: …in the one-woman Broadway show The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe (1985–86), for which she received a Tony for best actress. The 1991 film adaptation, however, was largely ignored.

  • search image (animal behaviour)

    coloration: Coloration changes in populations: The phenomenon—known as a perceptual set or a search image—is exemplified by the predator of the European snail Cepaea. Predators encounter one morph and form a search image; they continue to hunt for that one form until its increasing rarity causes the predator to hunt randomly, encounter a different…

  • search market (economics)

    Peter A. Diamond: …their analysis of markets with search frictions.” The theoretical framework collectively developed by the three men—which describes the search activity of the unemployed, the methods by which firms recruit and formulate wages, and the effects of economic policies and regulation—became widely used in labour market analysis.

  • search problem (industrial engineering)

    operations research: Search problems: Search problems involve finding the best way to obtain information needed for a decision. Though every problem contains a search problem in one sense, situations exist in which search itself is the essential process; for example, in auditing accounts, inspection and quality control…

  • Search, The (film by Zinnemann [1948])

    Fred Zinnemann: Films of the late 1930s and 1940s: Zinnemann’s next project, The Search (1948), was considerably more prestigious. The first film shot in Germany following the conclusion of World War II, it was the moving story of an American soldier (played by Montgomery Clift, in his second film) stationed in Berlin who tries to adopt a…

  • searcher (insect)

    ground beetle: The searcher, or caterpillar hunter (Calosoma scrutator), is a common, brightly coloured North American ground beetle about 35 mm (1.5 inches) long. Its green or violet wings are edged in red, and its body has violet-blue, gold, and green markings. This and related species of ground beetles are…

  • Searchers, The (film by Ford [1956])

    The Searchers, American western film, released in 1956, that is widely considered director John Ford’s masterpiece. It features John Wayne in one of his most-notable performances, portraying perhaps the most morally ambiguous character of his career. Ethan Edwards (played by Wayne) is a mysterious

  • Searchin’? (song by Leiber and Stoller)

    the Coasters: …directed at teenage listeners: “Searchin’ ” and “Young Blood” (both 1957), “Yakety Yak” (1958), and “Charlie Brown” and “Poison Ivy” (both 1959). The Coasters alternated lead singers and featured clever arrangements, including amusing bass replies and tenor saxophone solos by King Curtis, who played a crucial role in creating…

  • searching (computing)

    information processing: Information searching and retrieval: State-of-the-art approaches to retrieving information employ two generic techniques: (1) matching words in the query against the database index (key-word searching) and (2) traversing the database with the aid of hypertext or hypermedia links.

  • Searching for Caleb (novel by Tyler)

    Anne Tyler: …of Celestial Navigation (1974) and Searching for Caleb (1975) that Tyler came to nationwide attention.

  • searchlight (lighting)

    Searchlight, high-intensity electric light with a reflector shaped to concentrate the beam, used to illuminate or search for distant objects or as a beacon. Carbon arc lamps have been used from about 1870 and from about 1910 rare-earth fluorides or oxides have been added to the carbon to create

  • Searcy (Arkansas, United States)

    Searcy, city, seat (1837) of White county, east-central Arkansas, U.S., near the Little Red River, 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Little Rock. It originated as White Sulphur Springs, a spa popular in the 19th century until the springs ran dry. Incorporated in 1835, it was renamed for Richard Searcy,

  • Searle, John (American philosopher)

    John Searle, American philosopher best known for his work in the philosophy of language—especially speech act theory—and the philosophy of mind. He also made significant contributions to epistemology, ontology, the philosophy of social institutions, and the study of practical reason. He viewed his

  • Searle, Ronald (British artist)

    Ronald Searle, British graphic satirist, best known for his cartoons of the girls at an imaginary school he called St. Trinian’s. Searle was educated at the Cambridge School of Art and published his first humorous work in the late 1930s. During World War II he served with the Royal Engineers and

  • Searle, Ronald William Fordham (British artist)

    Ronald Searle, British graphic satirist, best known for his cartoons of the girls at an imaginary school he called St. Trinian’s. Searle was educated at the Cambridge School of Art and published his first humorous work in the late 1930s. During World War II he served with the Royal Engineers and

  • Searles Lake (playa, California, United States)

    Searles Lake, playa in San Bernardino county, southern California, U.S. Lying to the west of the southern edge of Death Valley National Park, it formed part of a Pleistocene drainage network linking a number of now-arid basins. Certain minerals constituting the playa’s evaporites are relatively

  • Sears (American company)

    Sears, American retailer of general merchandise, tools, home appliances, clothing, and automotive parts and services. It is a subsidiary of Sears Holdings Corporation, which, following a bankruptcy auction, was purchased by the hedge fund ESL Investments in 2019. In 1886 Richard W. Sears founded

  • Sears catalog

    When Sears, Roebuck and Co. announced in January 1993 that it would close down its mail-order catalog operation at the end of the year, the news marked the passing of one of the great icons of Americana. Over the 97 years of the Sears catalog’s existence, its arrival in millions of American homes

  • Sears Tower (building, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Willis Tower, skyscraper office building in Chicago, Illinois, located at 233 South Wacker Drive, that is one of the world’s tallest buildings. The Sears Tower opened to tenants in 1973, though construction was not actually completed until 1974. Built for Sears, Roebuck and Company, the structure

  • Sears Video Arcade (video game console)

    Atari console, video game console released in 1977 by the North American game manufacturer Atari, Inc. Using a cartridge-based system that allowed users to play a variety of video games, the Atari console marked the beginning of a new era in home gaming systems. Developed by Atari cofounder Nolan

  • Sears, Isaac (American patriot leader)

    Isaac Sears, patriot leader in New York City before the American Revolution, who earned the nickname “King Sears” by virtue of his prominent role in inciting and commanding anti-British demonstrations. A merchant whose shipping activities included privateering, Sears first exhibited his patriot

  • Sears, Richard Dudley (American athlete)

    Richard Dudley Sears, the first American men’s singles champion in lawn tennis (1881) and winner of that title for each of the six following years. His record has never been equaled by any other amateur player. Sears also won the U.S. men’s doubles championship for six straight years (1882–84 and

  • Sears, Richard W. (American merchant)

    Richard W. Sears, American merchant who developed his mail-order jewelry business into the huge retail company Sears, Roebuck. Sears’s father had been wealthy but lost his fortune in speculation. After his death the young Sears, age 17, went to work for the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway to

  • Sears, Richard Warren (American merchant)

    Richard W. Sears, American merchant who developed his mail-order jewelry business into the huge retail company Sears, Roebuck. Sears’s father had been wealthy but lost his fortune in speculation. After his death the young Sears, age 17, went to work for the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway to

  • Sears, Robert (psychologist)

    frustration-aggression hypothesis: Background and assumptions: Mowrer, and Robert Sears—in an important monograph, Frustration and Aggression (1939), in which they integrated ideas and findings from several disciplines, especially sociology, anthropology, and psychology. Their work was notable for its eclectic use of psychoanalysis, behaviourism, and Marxism. It became

  • Sears, Roebuck and Company (American company)

    Sears, American retailer of general merchandise, tools, home appliances, clothing, and automotive parts and services. It is a subsidiary of Sears Holdings Corporation, which, following a bankruptcy auction, was purchased by the hedge fund ESL Investments in 2019. In 1886 Richard W. Sears founded

  • Sears, Roebuck and Company Store (building, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    William Le Baron Jenney: …of Montgomery Ward); and the second Leiter Building (1889–90), which became Sears, Roebuck and Co.’s Loop store.

  • seas, freedom of the (international law)

    high seas: …subjected to national sovereignty (freedom of the seas) was proposed by the Dutch jurist Hugo Grotius as early as 1609. It did not become an accepted principle of international law, however, until the 19th century. Freedom of the seas was ideologically connected with other 19th-century freedoms, particularly laissez-faire economic…

  • Seasat (satellite)

    Seasat, experimental U.S. ocean surveillance satellite launched June 26, 1978. During its 99 days of operation, Seasat orbited the Earth 14 times daily. Instruments of the unmanned spacecraft, engineered to penetrate cloud cover, provided data on a wide array of oceanographic conditions and

  • Seascape (play by Albee)

    Seascape, drama in two acts by Edward Albee, produced and published in 1975; it won the Pulitzer Prize for drama that year. The play presents Nancy and Charlie, a married couple. Picnicking by the ocean one day, they meet Leslie and Sarah, middle-aged giant lizards from beneath the sea who want to

  • seascape (art)

    Winslow Homer: The move to Prouts Neck: …to America in 1883, the sea became the dominant theme in his work. He moved to Prouts Neck, a fishing village on the bleak, desolate coast of Maine. He traveled extensively but always returned to his Prouts Neck studio to convert his sketches into major paintings. Solitude became for Homer…

  • seashell (zoology)

    Seashell, hard exoskeleton of marine mollusks such as snails, bivalves, and chitons that serves to protect and support their bodies. It is composed largely of calcium carbonate secreted by the mantle, a skinlike tissue in the mollusk’s body wall. Seashells are usually made up of several layers of

  • seashore false bindweed (plant)

    bindweed: Seashore false bindweed (Calystegia soldanella), with fleshy kidney-shaped leaves and deep pink 5-cm blooms, creeps along European seaside sand and gravel.

  • seasickness

    Motion sickness, sickness induced by motion and characterized by nausea. The term motion sickness was proposed by J.A. Irwin in 1881 to provide a general designation for such similar syndromes as seasickness, train sickness, car sickness, and airsickness. This term, though imprecise for scientific

  • Seaside (resort, Florida, United States)

    Andrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk: …with their revolutionary scheme for Seaside (begun 1980, completed 1983), a resort on the Gulf Coast of Florida.

  • Seaside (Oregon, United States)

    Seaside, city, Clatsop county, northwestern Oregon, U.S., on the Pacific Coast, south of Astoria. The site became popular as a seaside resort with the construction of a lavish guesthouse in the 1870s. A 2-mile (3-km) boardwalk runs atop a seawall paralleling the coast. Members of the Lewis and

  • Seaside Heights (borough, New Jersey, United States)

    Superstorm Sandy: Damage: The boardwalks of Seaside Heights and Belmar were also destroyed, along with many coastal developments along New Jersey’s shoreline. During the storm, water from the Hudson River overtopped the seawall protecting Hoboken and flooded much of the city, isolating an estimated 20,000 residents in their homes.

  • season (meteorological division)

    Season, any of four divisions of the year according to consistent annual changes in the weather. The seasons—winter, spring, summer, and autumn—are commonly regarded in the Northern Hemisphere as beginning respectively on the winter solstice, December 21 or 22; on the vernal equinox, March 20 or

  • Season in Hell, A (work by Rimbaud)

    A Season in Hell, collection of prose and poetry pieces by French Symbolist poet Arthur Rimbaud, published in 1873, when Rimbaud was 19, as Une Saison en enfer. The collection is a form of spiritual autobiography in which the author comes to a new self-awareness through an examination of his life

  • Season in Paradise, A (work by Breytenbach)

    Breyten Breytenbach: …Seisoen in die Paradys (A Season in Paradise) was published in 1976, and other prison writings were published as Mouroir: Bespie?lende notas van ’n roman (Mouroir: Mirrornotes of a Novel) in 1983. In 1982 he was freed, and he subsequently returned to Paris. The True Confessions of an Albino…

  • Season in Rihata, A (novel by Condé)

    Maryse Condé: Un Saison à Rihata (1981; A Season in Rihata) is set in a late 20th-century African land.

  • Season in the Congo, A (play by Césaire)

    Aimé Césaire: …Une Saison au Congo (1966; A Season in the Congo), the epic of the 1960 Congo rebellion and of the assassination of the Congolese political leader Patrice Lumumba. Both depict the fate of black power as forever doomed to failure.

  • Season in the Life of Emmanuel, A (novel by Blais)

    Canadian literature: Contemporary trends: …dans la vie d’Emmanuel (1965; A Season in the Life of Emmanuel), which won the Prix Médicis, presented a scathing denunciation of Quebec rural life, and Godbout’s Salut, Galarneau! (1967; Hail, Galarneau!) described the Americanization of Quebec. Blais went on to receive critical acclaim for Soifs (1995; These Festive Nights),…

  • Season of Adventure (novel by Lamming)

    George Lamming: …problems of political independence; and Season of Adventure (1960), in which a West Indian woman discovers her African heritage. The Pleasures of Exile (1960) is a collection of essays that examines Caribbean politics, race, and culture in an international context. Lamming’s later novels include Water with Berries (1971), a political…

  • Season of Glass (album by Ono)

    Yoko Ono: …Ice” (1981) and the album Season of Glass (1981), which captured her emotional reaction to Lennon’s death, among the highlights. Her later releases include Rising (1995), recorded with Sean’s band IMA, and Between My Head and the Sky (2009), for which she resurrected the Plastic Ono Band moniker. Beginning in…

  • Season of Migration to the North (work by ?āli?)

    al-?ayyib ?āli?: …Mawsim al-hijrah ilā al-shamāl (1966; Season of Migration to the North) is a prose poem that reflects the conflicts of modern Africa: traditions and common sense versus education, rural versus urban, men versus women, and the specific versus the universal. ?āli?’s prose is polyrhythmic and haunting.

  • seasonal affective disorder (psychology)

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), mood disorder characterized by recurring depression in autumn and winter, separated by periods of nondepression in spring and summer. The condition was first described in 1984 by American psychiatrist Norman Rosenthal. In autumn, when the days grow progressively

  • seasonal cycle (meteorological division)

    Season, any of four divisions of the year according to consistent annual changes in the weather. The seasons—winter, spring, summer, and autumn—are commonly regarded in the Northern Hemisphere as beginning respectively on the winter solstice, December 21 or 22; on the vernal equinox, March 20 or

  • Seasonal Distribution of Atlantic Plankton Organisms, The (work by Cleve)

    Per Teodor Cleve: …and Cleve’s work on diatoms, The Seasonal Distribution of Atlantic Plankton Organisms (1900), became a basic text on oceanography.

  • seasonal labour

    economic development: Surplus resources and disguised unemployment: …may be better described as seasonal unemployment during the off-seasons. The magnitude of this seasonal unemployment, however, depends not so much on the population density on land as on the number of crops cultivated on the same piece of land through the year. There is thus little seasonal unemployment in…

  • seasonal nomadism (pastoral society)

    Transhumance, form of pastoralism or nomadism organized around the migration of livestock between mountain pastures in warm seasons and lower altitudes the rest of the year. The seasonal migration may also occur between lower and upper latitudes (as in the movement of Siberian reindeer between the

  • Seasonale (contraceptive)

    levonorgestrel: …in combination with estradiol in Seasonale—an extended-cycle oral contraceptive, which enables an 84-day span between menstruations—and in a morning-after pill called Plan B. In 1999 Plan B became available by prescription in the United States. In 2006, after a long politically charged debate, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved…

  • seasoning (food)

    Flavouring, any of the liquid extracts, essences, and flavours that are added to foods to enhance their taste and aroma. Flavourings are prepared from essential oils, such as almond and lemon; from vanilla; from fresh fruits by expression; from ginger by extraction; from mixtures of essential oils

  • seasoning (treatment process)

    Seasoning, in lumbering, drying lumber to prepare it for use. Unseasoned (green) wood is subject to attack by fungi and insects, and it also shrinks as it dries. Because it does not shrink evenly in all directions, it is likely to split and warp. The most common seasoning methods are air seasoning

  • seasoning (slavery)

    slavery: The international slave trade: …began the period of “seasoning” for the slave, the period of about a year or so when he either succumbed to the disease environment of the New World or survived it. Many slaves landed on the North American mainland before the early 18th century had already survived the seasoning…

  • Seasons on Earth (work by Koch)

    Kenneth Koch: …also in ottava rima, as Seasons on Earth (1987). He also wrote Sleeping with Women (1969) and the long prose poem The Burning Mystery of Anna in 1951 (1979), as well as many shorter verses, including those collected in Selected Poems 1950–82 (1991). In 1994 he published two collections, On…

  • Seasons, Society of the (revolutionary organization, France)

    Auguste Blanqui: …of Families”) and then the Société des Saisons (“Society of the Seasons”). The latter society’s disastrous attempt at insurrection on May 12, 1839, was the classic prototype of the Blanquist surprise attack. Five hundred armed revolutionaries took the H?tel de Ville (“City Hall”) of Paris, but, isolated from the rest…

  • Seasons, The (work by Donelaitis)

    Kristijonas Donelaitis: His main work, Metai (1818; The Seasons), 2,997 lines in length, was written in hexameters, which were never before used in Lithuanian verse. It depicts realistically and in their own dialect the life of the serfs and the countryside of 18th-century Prussian Lithuania. The poem was first published in an…

  • Seasons, The (work by Haydn)

    oratorio: Oratorio after 1750: Haydn called Die Jahreszeiten (1801; The Seasons) an oratorio, though its content is secular and its form a loosely articulated series of evocative pieces. Ludwig van Beethoven’s single oratorio, Christus am ?lberg (1803; Christ on the Mount of Olives), does not succeed, nor do most of those occasioned by the…

  • Seasons, The (poem by Thomson)

    Joseph Haydn: The late Esterházy and Viennese period: An extended poem, The Seasons, by James Thomson, was chosen as the basis for the (much shorter) libretto, again adapted and translated—if somewhat awkwardly—by van Swieten so as to enable performance in either German or English. The libretto allowed Haydn to compose delightful musical analogues of events in…

  • Seastrom, Victor (Swedish actor and director)

    Victor Sj?str?m, motion-picture actor and director who contributed significantly to the international preeminence of the Swedish silent film in the post-World War I era. Influenced by the novels of Selma Lagerl?f, whose art is rooted in sagas and folklore and imbued with a reverence for nature,

  • seat belt (safety device)

    accident: Motor vehicle accidents: Although seat belts can save lives, millions of people fail to use them. Likewise, helmets are an effective means of protecting motorcyclists from traumatic brain injury and death, yet many riders choose not to wear a helmet.

  • Seat of Government Administration Act (Australia [1910])

    Australian Capital Territory: History: …ownership in accordance with the Seat of Government (Administration) Act of 1910. Also in 1911, the Commonwealth of Australia launched an international competition for the design of its new capital. First prize was awarded to Walter Burley Griffin, a Chicago architect who had worked in the studio of Frank Lloyd…

  • seat worm (nematode)

    Pinworm, worm belonging to the family Oxyuridae in the order Ascaridida (phylum Nematoda). Pinworms are common human intestinal parasites, especially in children. They are also found in other vertebrates. Male pinworms are 2 to 5 mm (about 0.08 to 0.2 inch) long; females range in length from 8 to

  • seat-earth (geology)

    cyclothem: …seam is underlain by a seat-earth (underclay). Above the coal, a limestone or a claystone (shale or mudstone) with marine shells is often found. The marine shells disappear in the succeeding shales, to be replaced occasionally by nonmarine bivalves. Before another seat-earth and coal appears, a siltstone or a sandstone…

  • Seated Scribe (work by Bellini)

    Gentile Bellini: In his pen-and-gouache drawing Seated Scribe (1479–80), Gentile employs a flat patterned style similar to that of the Turkish miniatures that influenced such later works as his Portrait of Doge Giovanni Mocenigo (1478–85).

  • Seated Woman, The (sculpture by Duchamp-Villon)

    Raymond Duchamp-Villon: With works such as Seated Woman (1914), Duchamp-Villon increasingly employed the Cubist painters’ technique of dissecting an object into abstract shapes.

  • Seated Youth (work by Lehmbruck)

    Wilhelm Lehmbruck: …as The Fallen (1915–16) and Seated Youth (1918), which indicate the artist’s state of utter depression. He committed suicide one year later. Although he was not involved in the German Expressionist movement, the emotionalism and elongated features of his sculptures have led critics and historians to associate Lehmbruck with Expressionism.

  • Seati River (river, South Africa)

    Orange River: Physiography: The Seati (Khubedu) headwater rises near Mont-aux-Sources to the north. Still farther north is the lesser-known Malibamatso headwater, one site of the Lesotho Highland Project. The Lesotho headwaters flow over the turf soil that covers Drakensberg lava and cut through the lava to expose underlying sedimentary…

  • SEATO

    Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO), regional-defense organization from 1955 to 1977, created by the Southeast Asia Collective Defence Treaty, signed at Manila on September 8, 1954, by representatives of Australia, France, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Thailand, the United Kingdom,

  • Seaton Delaval (England, United Kingdom)

    Blyth Valley: The town of Seaton Delaval had strong links with the landowning Delaval family, for whom the classical-style Seaton Delaval Hall, designed by Sir John Vanbrugh, was built (1719–30). Blyth Valley is mainly urban and suburban but contains some open countryside and woodland.

  • Seaton, George (American screenwriter and director)

    George Seaton, American screenwriter and film director who was perhaps best known for his work on Miracle on 34th Street (1947) and The Country Girl (1954), both of which earned him Academy Awards for best screenplay. Stenius, the son of Swedish immigrants, was raised in Detroit. He took the stage

  • Seattle (Washington, United States)

    Seattle, chief city of the state of Washington, U.S., seat (1853) of King county, the largest metropolis of the Pacific Northwest, and one of the largest and most affluent urban centres in the United States. A major port of entry and an air and sea gateway to Asia and Alaska, Seattle lies alongside

  • Seattle (American Indian chief)

    Seattle, chief of the Duwamish, Suquamish, and other Puget Sound tribes who befriended white settlers of the region. Seattle came under the influence of French missionaries, was converted to Roman Catholicism, and instituted morning and evening services among his people—a practice maintained after

  • Seattle Center (Seattle, Washington, United States)

    Seattle: City layout: …popular neighbourhood of Belltown stands Seattle Center, the 74-acre (30-hectare) site of the 1962 World’s Fair. The centre contains the 605-foot- (184-metre-) high Space Needle, Seattle’s best-known landmark, as well as McCaw Hall (home of the Seattle Opera), Key Arena, the Children’s Museum, the Museum of Pop Culture, and other…

  • Seattle City Light (electrical utility, Seattle, Washington, United States)

    Seattle: Municipal services: The city operates Seattle City Light, an electrical utility that, with other agencies, maintains a series of hydroelectric dams on nearby waterways. Among the earliest municipally owned utilities in the country and overseen by the city council’s energy and environmental policy committee, Seattle City Light has long served…

  • Seattle College (university, Seattle, Washington, United States)

    Seattle University, private, coeducational institution of higher education in Seattle, Washington, U.S. It is affiliated with the Jesuit order of the Roman Catholic church. It offers about 50 undergraduate degree programs and about 20 graduate degree programs; professional degrees are also

  • Seattle Mariners (American baseball team)

    Seattle Mariners, American professional baseball team based in Seattle that plays in the American League (AL). The Mariners were founded in 1977 and posted losing records until 1991 (an all-time mark for the longest period before a franchise’s first winning season). The team is the only current

  • Seattle Pilots (American baseball team)

    Milwaukee Brewers, American professional baseball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Brewers play in the National League (NL), but they spent their first 29 seasons (1969–97) in the American League (AL). The team that would become the Brewers was founded in 1969 in Seattle as the Pilots. After

  • Seattle Post-Intelligencer (American newspaper)

    Washington: Media and publishing: The Seattle Times and Seattle Post-Intelligencer are Washington’s leading newspapers, although in 2009 the Post-Intelligencer became an online-only publication. Daily newspapers around the state are the Columbian (Vancouver), Spokesman-Review (Spokane), Herald (Everett), News Tribune (Tacoma), and Olympian (Olympia). A number of weekly and biweekly business journals provide financial and…

  • Seattle Seahawks (American football team)

    Seattle Seahawks, American professional gridiron football team based in Seattle. The Seahawks play in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the National Football League (NFL) and have won one Super Bowl title (2014) and three NFC championships (2006, 2014, and 2015). Along with fellow expansion

  • Seattle Slew (racehorse)

    Seattle Slew, (foaled 1974), American racehorse (Thoroughbred) who in 1977 became the 10th winner of the American Triple Crown—the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes, and the Belmont Stakes—and the only horse to win the Triple Crown with an undefeated record. Seattle Slew was foaled on February

  • Seattle Sonics (American basketball team)

    Kevin Durant: …and was selected by the Seattle SuperSonics with the second overall pick of the 2007 NBA draft.

  • Seattle Storm (American basketball team)

    Anne Donovan: In 2004 Donovan led the Seattle Storm to its first WNBA championship. She was the head coach of Seton Hall University from 2010 to 2013. Donovan also won a gold medal as the head coach of the U.S. national team at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. In addition to coaching,…

  • Seattle Supersonics (American basketball team)

    Kevin Durant: …and was selected by the Seattle SuperSonics with the second overall pick of the 2007 NBA draft.

  • Seattle Symphony (American orchestra)

    Seattle: Cultural life: The Seattle Symphony, founded in 1903, was the first in the world to be conducted by a woman, and it has issued many recordings of live and studio performances. The symphony often performs in association with the Seattle Opera.

  • Seattle University (university, Seattle, Washington, United States)

    Seattle University, private, coeducational institution of higher education in Seattle, Washington, U.S. It is affiliated with the Jesuit order of the Roman Catholic church. It offers about 50 undergraduate degree programs and about 20 graduate degree programs; professional degrees are also

  • Seattle World Trade Organization protests of 1999

    Seattle WTO protests of 1999, a series of marches, direct actions, and protests carried out from November 28 through December 3, 1999, that disrupted the World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Seattle, Washington. Comprising a broad and diffuse coalition of the American Federation

  • Seattle WTO protests of 1999

    Seattle WTO protests of 1999, a series of marches, direct actions, and protests carried out from November 28 through December 3, 1999, that disrupted the World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Seattle, Washington. Comprising a broad and diffuse coalition of the American Federation

  • Seattle, Battle of

    Seattle WTO protests of 1999, a series of marches, direct actions, and protests carried out from November 28 through December 3, 1999, that disrupted the World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Seattle, Washington. Comprising a broad and diffuse coalition of the American Federation

  • Seattle, Port of (port, Seattle, Washington, United States)

    Seattle: Transportation: The Port of Seattle, established in 1911, is one of the largest container-cargo ports in the United States and in the world. The port encompasses some 570 acres (230 hectares) of container-handling facilities. Ferries serve nearby Vashon Island, Bainbridge Island, Bremerton, and other points along Puget…

  • Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (airport, Washington, United States)

    Seattle: Transportation: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (Sea-Tac), 13 miles (21 km) south of the city centre, is a major gateway connecting Asia, Europe, and North America and is among the leading U.S. airports in international passenger travel. It is served by dozens of airlines (including Alaska Airlines, headquartered…

  • Seau, Junior (American football player)

    Junior Seau, (Tiaina Baul Seau, Jr.), American football player (born Jan. 19, 1969, San Diego, Calif.—died May 2, 2012, Oceanside, Calif.), was a formidable and intense linebacker who played for 20 seasons with the NFL teams the New England Patriots (2006–09), the Miami Dolphins (2003–05), and the

  • Seau, Tiaina Baul Seau, Jr. (American football player)

    Junior Seau, (Tiaina Baul Seau, Jr.), American football player (born Jan. 19, 1969, San Diego, Calif.—died May 2, 2012, Oceanside, Calif.), was a formidable and intense linebacker who played for 20 seasons with the NFL teams the New England Patriots (2006–09), the Miami Dolphins (2003–05), and the

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载