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  • Seistan (depression, Asia)

    Sīstān, extensive border region, eastern Iran and southwestern Afghanistan. Forty percent of its area is in Iran, as well as the majority of its sparse population. The region comprises a large depression some 1,500–1,700 feet (450–520 m) in elevation. Numerous rivers fill a series of lagoons

  • seistron (musical instrument)

    Sistrum, percussion instrument, a rattle consisting of a wood, metal, or clay frame set loosely with crossbars (often hung with jingles) that sound when the instrument is shaken. A handle is attached to the frame. In ancient Egypt, sistrums were either temple-shaped or had a closed-horseshoe shape.

  • seita (sacrificial stone)

    Finno-Ugric religion: Cult centres: …in reindeer herding and fishing) seita (“sacrificial stone”) places for worship arose near a reindeer migration route or a good fishing place, and for such a place an outstanding stone generally was chosen. The Ob Ugrians had a kind of “mobile temple” for the wooden idols (normally kept in the…

  • seitan (protein)

    Gluten, a yellowish gray powdery mixture of water-insoluble proteins occurring in wheat and other cereal grains and composed chiefly of the proteins gliadin and glutenin. Its presence in flour helps make the production of leavened, or raised, baked goods possible because the chainlike molecules

  • Seiter, William A. (American director)

    William A. Seiter, American director who made more than 100 feature films and was especially noted for his musicals and light comedies. Seiter graduated from the Hudson River Military Academy, and by the early 1910s he was working in Hollywood. He acted in short films, notably playing a Keystone

  • Seitsem?n veljest? (work by Kivi)

    Aleksis Kivi: Kivi’s Seitsem?n veljest? (1870; Seven Brothers), the first novel written in Finnish, tells the story of some freedom-loving village youths who take to the woods and live a life of adventure but gradually mature and finally accept the responsibilities of sober citizens in a farming community. It contains elements…

  • Seitz, Dick (American entrepreneur)

    baseball: Fantasy baseball: …introduced in 1951 by entrepreneur Dick Seitz, known as APBA (American Professional Baseball Association). A similar game called Strat-o-matic first appeared in the 1960s. Having purchased the APBA or Strat-o-matic board game, players annually ordered cards that listed the statistical data for the ballplayers from the prior season. A combination…

  • Seitz, Frederick (American physicist)

    Frederick Seitz, American physicist (born July 4, 1911, San Francisco, Calif.—died March 2, 2008, New York, N.Y.), helped advance the field of solid-state physics and played an important role in developing the atomic bomb. While a graduate student at Princeton University, Seitz, together with his

  • Seitz, Karl (Austrian politician)

    Karl Seitz, politician, acting head of Austria (1919–20) after the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and longtime Socialist mayor of Vienna (1923–34). He served as a Social Democrat member of the Austrian Reichsrat (national assembly) through the last years of the empire, and after World

  • SEIU (American labour organization)

    John Sweeney: In 1961 he joined the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) as a contract director for New York City Local 32B, and he became president of the local in 1976. Elected president of the SEIU in 1980, he was credited with boosting membership by 75 percent (to more than one million)…

  • Seiurus aurocapillus (bird)

    ovenbird: …with a side entrance, especially Seiurus aurocapillus, a wood warbler (family Parulidae, order Passeriformes) of North America east of the Rockies; it winters south to Colombia. Brownish olive above, with a streaked breast, white eye ring, and black-edged orange crown, the bird looks like a small thrush. Its song, “tee-cher,”…

  • Seiwa (emperor of Japan)

    Fujiwara Family: Beginnings.: …the throne as the emperor Seiwa at the age of nine. Yoshifusa, thereupon, had himself appointed regent—the first instance in Japanese history of a person not of royal blood being named to this position. This led to the practice of the Fujiwara persuading emperors to retire at a comparatively early…

  • Seiyō jijō (work by Fukuzawa Yukichi)

    Fukuzawa Yukichi: … in 1862—after which he wrote Seiyō jijō (“Conditions in the West”). The book became popular overnight because of its simple and clear descriptions of the political, economic, and cultural institutions of the Occident. Continuing his efforts to introduce Western ways into Japan, he developed a lucid writing style and began…

  • Seiyō tetsugakushi yō (work by Hatano Seiichi)

    Hatano Seiichi: Hatano’s Seiyō tetsugakushi yō (“Outline of the History of Western Philosophy”), written in 1907, was the first serious attempt in Japan to produce a survey of Western philosophy and soon became required reading for all university students. During the following years, Hatano did a series of…

  • Seiyō-gadan (work by Shiba Kōkan)

    Shiba Kōkan: In 1799 he wrote Seiyō-gadan (“Dissertation on Western Painting”), in which he explained fundamental principles of the realism of Western painting.

  • Seiyoyoroku (work by Yamaga Sokō)

    Yamaga Sokō: …volumes under the title Seiyōyōroku (“Summary of Holy Teachings”). His views were seen as a potential challenge to Tokugawa authority, and he was banished from the capital in the custody of the Lord of Akō and exiled to one of the remote corners of Japan.

  • seize mai, le (French history)

    Jules Simon: …precipitating the constitutional crisis of le seize mai (May 16), centring on the question of whether ministerial responsibility was owed to the president or to the Chamber. Because events determined that it should be owed to the Chamber, Mac-Mahon himself resigned on Jan. 30, 1879, and the Third Republic became…

  • Seize Quartiers (heraldry)

    heraldry: Continental versus British heraldry: The doctrine of seize quartiers (“16 quarters”) prevailed over most of the Continent but not in Britain. This theory required that, in order for a person to claim a specific degree of nobility, all of his 16 great-great-grandparents should have been entitled to bear arms. This, the “proof…

  • Seize the Day (novella by Bellow)

    Seize the Day, novella by American author Saul Bellow, published in 1956. This short novel examines one day in the unhappy life of Tommy Wilhelm, who has fallen from marginal middle-management respectability to unemployment, divorce, and despair. Like many of Bellow’s other novels, Seize the Day

  • Seize the Time (work by Seale)

    Bobby Seale: …autobiography A Lonely Rage (1978), Seize the Time: The Story of the Black Panther Party and Huey P. Newton (1970), and Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers (2016; cowritten with Stephen Shames). Seale also published Barbeque’n with Bobby (1988), a cookbook.

  • seizing (knot)

    Seizing, means of fastening together two spars, two ropes, or two parts of the same rope by means of a third rope. Two parts of the same rope may be thus joined to make an eye, or closed circle. When two ropes are joined and the strain on one is to be greater than that on the other, racking

  • Seizinger, Katja (German skier)

    Nagano 1998 Olympic Winter Games: …women’s competition starred German sensation Katja Seizinger, who won the downhill and Alpine combined events. In Nordic skiing, Bj?rn Daehlie of Norway further strengthened his claim to being the greatest cross-country skier ever. The Norwegian skied to gold medals in the 10-km event and the 4 × 10-km relay and…

  • Seizo Terashima (Japanese actor)

    Onoe Baiko VII , (SEIZO TERASHIMA), Japanese Kabuki actor (born Aug. 31, 1915, Tokyo, Japan—died March 24, 1995, Tokyo), was revered as the country’s leading postwar onnagata (female impersonator) and was designated a Living National Treasure in 1968. Baiko captivated audiences with his exquisite s

  • seizure (pathology)

    burn: Complications.: The occurrences of post-burn seizures is a complication unique to children. These seizures may result from electrolyte imbalances, abnormally low levels of oxygen in the blood, infection, or drugs. The cause is unknown in about a third of the cases. Post-burn hypertension is also somewhat unique to children and…

  • seizure (law)

    Search and seizure, practices engaged in by law enforcement officers in order to gain sufficient evidence to ensure the arrest and conviction of an offender. The latitude allowed police and other law enforcement agents in carrying out searches and seizures varies considerably from country to

  • Sejanus (Roman official)

    Sejanus, chief administrator of the Roman Empire for the emperor Tiberius, alleged murderer of Tiberius’s only son, Drusus Caesar, and suspect in a plot to overthrow Tiberius and become emperor himself. Sejanus was related through his mother to the distinguished senatorial family Cornelii Lentuli.

  • Sejanus (play by Jonson)

    tragedy: Shakespearean tragedy: …to have acted in Jonson’s Sejanus in 1603, a very Classical play, published in 1605 with a learned essay on Aristotle as preface. It can be assumed that Shakespeare knew the tradition. Certainly the Elizabethan theatre could not have existed without the Greek and Roman prototype. For all of its…

  • Sejanus, Lucius Aelius (Roman official)

    Sejanus, chief administrator of the Roman Empire for the emperor Tiberius, alleged murderer of Tiberius’s only son, Drusus Caesar, and suspect in a plot to overthrow Tiberius and become emperor himself. Sejanus was related through his mother to the distinguished senatorial family Cornelii Lentuli.

  • Sejarah Melayu (Malaysian literature)

    Sejarah Melayu, one of the finest literary and historical works in the Malay language. Concerning the Malaccan sultanate, it was composed sometime in the 15th or 16th century. The original text, written prior to 1536, underwent changes in 1612, ordered by Sultan Abdullah Maayah Shah. Only

  • Sejdiu, Fatmir (president of Kosovo)

    Kosovo: Political process: …PDK as prime minister and Fatmir Sejdiu of the LDK as president. The LDK was organized as a response to Kosovo’s loss of autonomy in 1989. Headed by the Kosovar Albanian nationalist writer Ibrahim Rugova, the LDK in 1992 declared the creation of the Republic of Kosovo, which remained internationally…

  • Sejima and Nishizawa and Associates (Japanese architectural firm)

    Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa: …founding partners of the firm SANAA (Sejima and Nishizawa and Associates), designed structures that were admired for their refined simplicity, spatial fluidity, and thoughtful integration into their surroundings. In 2010 they were awarded the Pritzker Prize, becoming only the second partnership to be so honoured. (The first was Jacques Herzog…

  • Sejima, Kazuyo (Japanese architect)

    Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa: Sejima earned a master’s degree in architecture in 1981 from Japan Women’s University. After apprenticing with architect Toyo Ito, she launched her own firm, Kazuyo Sejima and Associates, in 1987. Nishizawa, a student who had also worked for Ito, was one of her first hires.…

  • Sejima, Kazuyo; and Nishizawa, Ryue (Japanese architects)

    Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, Japanese architects who, as founding partners of the firm SANAA (Sejima and Nishizawa and Associates), designed structures that were admired for their refined simplicity, spatial fluidity, and thoughtful integration into their surroundings. In 2010 they were

  • Sejm (Polish legislature)

    Sejm, lower house of the national legislature of Poland. The term Sejm initially referred to the Polish legislature as a whole, which first met for all of Poland in 1493 and historically thereafter usually comprised two houses. In 1946 the Senate, or upper house, of the body was eliminated. It was

  • Sejo (Korean ruler)

    Korea: The establishment of a Confucian state: … or hangeul), was completed under Sejong’s direction.

  • Sejong (Korean ruler)

    Sejong, monarch of the Chos?n (Yi) dynasty during whose reign (1419–50) cultural achievements in Korea reached their highest point. Sejong is best known for his development of Hangul (Han’g?l), the phonetic system for writing the Korean language that is still in use. The creation of an easily

  • Sekai dai hyakkajiten (Japanese encyclopaedia)

    Dai hyakkajiten: …1955–63, a successor encyclopaedia, the Sekai dai hyakkajiten (“World Encyclopaedia”), was published in 33 volumes containing approximately 70,000 articles signed by specialists; it quickly became the standard Japanese encyclopaedia. The final three volumes contain supplementary material, which includes not only updated information covering the years 1958–63 but also a chronological…

  • Sekai Kyūsei-kyō (Japanese religion)

    ōmoto: …Seichōno-ie (Household of Growth) and Sekai Kyūsei-kyō (Religion of World Salvation), both founded by former disciples of Onisaburō. ōmoto emphasizes the universal character of religion. It promotes the use of the international language Esperanto and sponsors an organization called ULBA (Universal Love and Brotherhood Association).

  • Sekani (people)

    Sekani, Athabaskan-speaking North American Indian group that lived mostly in river valleys on the eastern and western slopes of the Rocky Mountains in what are now British Columbia and Alberta, Can. They were often harassed by the neighbouring Cree, Beaver, Carrier, and Shuswap peoples and, during

  • sekban (Ottoman soldier)

    Jelālī Revolts: The major uprisings involved the sekbans (irregular troops of musketeers) and sipahis (cavalrymen maintained by land grants). The rebellions were not attempts to overthrow the Ottoman government but were reactions to a social and economic crisis stemming from a number of factors: a depreciation of the currency, heavy taxation, a…

  • Sekber Golkar (political party, Indonesia)

    Golkar, social and political organization in Indonesia that evolved into a political party after it was founded as the Sekretariat Bersama Golongan Karya (Joint Secretariat of Functional Groups) by a group of army officers in 1964. Golkar, established ostensibly to counterbalance the growing power

  • seked (unit of measurement)

    mathematics: Geometry: For instance, the seked of a pyramid is stated as the number of palms in the horizontal corresponding to a rise of one cubit (seven palms). Thus, if the seked is 514 and the base is 140 cubits, the height becomes 9313 cubits (Rhind papyrus, problem 57). The…

  • Sekeetamys calurus (rodent)

    gerbil: Natural history: The bushy-tailed jird (Sekeetamys calurus) of northeastern Africa and adjacent Asia has an extremely bushy tail tipped with white. Depending on the species, gerbils’ tails may be much longer than the head and body, about the same length, or shorter. Their fur is soft and dense,…

  • Sekese, Azariele M. (South African author)

    African literature: Southern Sotho: …the Southern Sotho language was Azariele M. Sekese, who gathered Sotho oral traditions and published them in Mekhoa ea Basotho le maele le litsomo (1893; “Customs and Stories of the Sotho”). He also wrote a popular animal story, Bukana ea tsomo tsa pitso ea linonyana, le tseko ea Sefofu le…

  • sekh shat (ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic writing)

    Demotic script, Egyptian hieroglyphic writing of cursive form that was used in handwritten texts from the early 7th century bce until the 5th century ce. Demotic script derived from the earlier pictographic hieroglyphic inscriptions and the cursive hieratic script, and it began to replace hieratic

  • ?ekharī (Indian architecture)

    shikhara: … has two further variations: the shekhari and the bhumija. The shekhari consists of the central latina spires with one or more rows of half spires added on either side and miniature shikharas clustered along the base and corners. The shekhari was popular from the 10th century onward and can be…

  • Sekhmet (Egyptian goddess)

    Sekhmet, in Egyptian religion, a goddess of war and the destroyer of the enemies of the sun god Re. Sekhmet was associated both with disease and with healing and medicine. Like other fierce goddesses in the Egyptian pantheon, she was called the “Eye of Re.” She was the companion of the god Ptah and

  • Sekht-am (oasis, Egypt)

    Siwa Oasis, oasis in Ma?rū? mu?āfa?ah (governorate), western Egypt. It lies near the Libyan frontier, 350 miles (560 km) west-southwest of Cairo. The oasis is 6 miles (10 km) long by 4–5 miles (6–8 km) wide and has about 200 springs. Two rock outcrops provide the sites of the old walled settlements

  • ?eki (Azerbaijan)

    ??ki, city, north-central Azerbaijan. It is situated on the southern slopes of the Greater Caucasus Range. ??ki, one of the oldest cities in Azerbaijan, was a trading centre on the road to Dagestan. In the 18th and 19th centuries it served as the capital of the khanate of Sheki, which was ceded to

  • Seki Kōwa (Japanese mathematician)

    Seki Takakazu, the most important figure of the wasan (“Japanese calculation”) tradition (see mathematics, East Asian: Japan in the 17th century) that flourished from the early 17th century until the opening of Japan to the West in the mid-19th century. Seki was instrumental in recovering neglected

  • Seki Takakazu (Japanese mathematician)

    Seki Takakazu, the most important figure of the wasan (“Japanese calculation”) tradition (see mathematics, East Asian: Japan in the 17th century) that flourished from the early 17th century until the opening of Japan to the West in the mid-19th century. Seki was instrumental in recovering neglected

  • Seki Tsutomu (Japanese amateur astronomer)

    Comet Ikeya-Seki: …amateur astronomers, Ikeya Kaoru and Seki Tsutomu. Moving in a highly inclined retrograde orbit, the comet made its closest approach to the Sun (perihelion) on October 21, 1965, at a distance of 1.67 solar radius, or only 466,000 km (290,000 miles), above the Sun’s photosphere (visible surface). The comet was…

  • Sekigahara, Battle of (Japanese history)

    Battle of Sekigahara, (October 21, 1600), in Japanese history, a major conflict fought in central Honshu between vassals of Toyotomi Hideyoshi at the end of the Sengoku (“Warring States”) period. Led by daimyō Ishida Mitsunari, Toyotomi loyalists based mostly in western Japan clashed with largely

  • Sekiguchi Shinsuke (Japanese painter)

    Torii Kiyonaga, one of the most important Japanese artists of the Ukiyo-e movement (paintings and wood-block prints of the “floating world”). He was the pupil of Torii Kiyomitsu and for a time headed the Torii school. So great, however, was his loyalty to the Torii family that he made his own son,

  • Seklucjan, Jan (Polish translator)

    biblical literature: Slavic versions: …the Greek by the Lutheran Jan Seklucjan (K?nigsberg, 1553). The “Brest Bible” of 1563, sponsored by Prince Radziwi??, was a Protestant production made from the original languages. A version of this edition for the use of Socinians (Unitarians) was prepared by the Hebraist Szymon Budny (Nieswicz, 1570–82), and another revision,…

  • Sekondi-Takoradi (Ghana)

    Sekondi-Takoradi, port city on the Gulf of Guinea (an embayment of the Atlantic Ocean), southern Ghana. Both the Dutch and the British built forts at Sekondi in the 17th century that were destroyed by the Ahanta. Fort Orange, rebuilt by the Dutch and bought by the British in 1872, survives as a

  • Sekretariat Bersama Golongan Karya (political party, Indonesia)

    Golkar, social and political organization in Indonesia that evolved into a political party after it was founded as the Sekretariat Bersama Golongan Karya (Joint Secretariat of Functional Groups) by a group of army officers in 1964. Golkar, established ostensibly to counterbalance the growing power

  • Seku Ahmadu Lobbo (Fulani Muslim leader)

    Shehu Ahmadu Lobbo, Fulani Muslim leader in western Africa who established a theocratic state in the Macina region of what is now Mali. Influenced by the teachings of the Islamic reformer Usman dan Fodio, he began a holy war (jihad) in 1818 or possibly as early as 1810. He defeated the forces of

  • Seku Ahmadu Lobo (Fulani Muslim leader)

    Shehu Ahmadu Lobbo, Fulani Muslim leader in western Africa who established a theocratic state in the Macina region of what is now Mali. Influenced by the teachings of the Islamic reformer Usman dan Fodio, he began a holy war (jihad) in 1818 or possibly as early as 1810. He defeated the forces of

  • Sekulovich, Karl Mladen (American actor)

    Karl Malden, (Mladen Sekulovich), American actor (born March 22, 1912, Chicago, Ill.—died July 1, 2009, Los Angeles, Calif.), won critical acclaim for his strong character roles, ranging from psychologically intense villains to the earnest Everyman, most notably alongside Marlon Brando in A

  • Sel, Mehmed Ali (Turkish poet)

    Orhan Veli Kan?k, poet who was one of the most innovative poets in 20th-century Turkish literature. Educated at the Faculty of Literature of Istanbul University, he worked briefly as a teaching assistant before joining the Turkish postal administration in Ankara (1936–42). From 1942 to 1945 he

  • Sela (ancient city, Jordan)

    Petra, ancient city, centre of an Arab kingdom in Hellenistic and Roman times, the ruins of which are in southwest Jordan. The city was built on a terrace, pierced from east to west by the Wadi Mūsā (the Valley of Moses)—one of the places where, according to tradition, the Israelite leader Moses

  • SELA

    Latin American Economic System (SELA), association formed to promote economic cooperation and development throughout the region of Latin America. Established in 1975 through the Panama Convention, SELA succeeded the Special Committee for Latin American Coordination (CECLA). Nearly 30 Latin American

  • Selachii (fish)

    Shark, any of numerous species of cartilaginous fishes of predatory habit that constitute the order Selachii (class Chondrichthyes). Sharks, together with rays and skates, make up the subclass Elasmobranchii of the Chondrichthyes. Sharks differ from other elasmobranchs, however, and resemble

  • Selachii (fish class)

    Chondrichthyan, (class Chondrichthyes), any member of the diverse group of cartilaginous fishes that includes the sharks, skates, rays, and chimaeras. The class is one of the two great groups of living fishes, the other being the osteichthians, or bony fishes. The name Selachii is also sometimes

  • seladang (mammal)

    Seladang, Malayan wild cattle, a species of gaur

  • Selaginella (plant)

    Spike moss, (family Selaginellaceae), family of more than 700 species of mossy or fernlike seedless vascular plants of the order Selaginellales. The family consists of a single genus, Selaginella. They are widely distributed in all parts of the world, particularly in the tropics. Many are forest

  • Selaginella caulescens (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: caulescens) from East Asia.

  • Selaginella emmeliana (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: …as a houseplant, as are S. emmeliana from tropical America, variegated spike moss (S. martensii) from Mexico, blue spike moss (S. uncinata) from southern China, and handsome spike moss (S. caulescens) from East Asia.

  • Selaginella kraussiana (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: Spreading club moss, or Krauss’s spike moss (S. kraussiana), from southern Africa, roots readily along its trailing stems of bright green branches. It sometimes is grown as a houseplant, as are S. emmeliana from tropical America, variegated spike moss (S. martensii) from Mexico, blue spike…

  • Selaginella lepidophylla (Selaginella lepidophylla)
  • Selaginella martensii (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: …America, variegated spike moss (S. martensii) from Mexico, blue spike moss (S. uncinata) from southern China, and handsome spike moss (S. caulescens) from East Asia.

  • Selaginella rupestris (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: The similar rock selaginella (S. rupestris) of North America has smaller leaves, and its branching stems grow on rocks or in sand. Resurrection fern, or false rose of Jericho, (S. lepidophylla), is so named because as an apparently lifeless ball it unrolls when the wet season begins.…

  • Selaginella selaginoides (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: Lesser club moss, or club spike moss, (Selaginella selaginoides), is a small forest and bog-side plant in northern North America and Eurasia. Its branches trail along the ground, but the upright yellow-green strobili rise up to 8 cm (about 3 inches). The similar rock selaginella…

  • Selaginella uncinata (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: …Mexico, blue spike moss (S. uncinata) from southern China, and handsome spike moss (S. caulescens) from East Asia.

  • Selaginellales (plant order)

    lycophyte: Annotated classification: Order Selaginellales (spike mosses) Living and extinct plants with primary growth only; heterosporous; the sole living genus is Selaginella, with nearly 800 species, widely distributed around the world; Selaginellites is an extinct genus. Order Isoetales

  • Selaginellites (fossil plant genus)

    lycophyte: Annotated classification: …widely distributed around the world; Selaginellites is an extinct genus. Order Isoetales (quillworts) Living and extinct plants with secondary growth; heterosporous, with endosporic gametophytes; Isoetites is an extinct genus; a specialized group of species from the high Andes Mountains is sometimes segregated as a distinct genus, Stylites

  • Selajar (island, Indonesia)

    Selayar, largest of an island group off the southwestern tip of Celebes (Sulawesi), which is administered from Makassar as part of South Sulawesi propinsi (province), Indonesia. The other islands are Pasi, Bahuluang, Pulasi, and Tambulongang. All the islands are mountainous, but fertile lowlands

  • Selambs (work by Siwertz)

    Sigfrid Siwertz: …for the novel Selambs (1920; Downstream) and for his short stories.

  • Selandian Stage (paleontology)

    Selandian Stage, division of Paleocene rocks, representing all rocks deposited worldwide during the Selandian Age (61.6 million to 59.2 million years ago) of the Paleogene Period (66 million to 23 million years ago). The Selandian Stage is named for marine strata in the Seeland region of Denmark.

  • Selangor (region, Malaysia)

    Selangor, region of western West Malaysia (Malaya), occupying part of a coastal alluvial plain on the Strait of Malacca. In 1974, a 94-square-mile (243-square-kilometre) portion of Selangor, centring on Kuala Lumpur, was designated a wilayapersekutuan (federal territory). Selangor’s history and

  • Selangor Civil War (Malaysian history)

    Selangor Civil War, (1867–73), series of conflicts initially between Malay chiefs but later involving Chinese secret societies for control of tin-rich districts in Selangor. Following the disputed recognition of Abdul Samad as sultan in 1860, Malay chiefs gradually became polarized into two

  • Selaru (island, Indonesia)

    Tanimbar Islands: …vegetation along the shore, and Selaru to the south of Yamdena, rather flat and with much grassland. The group, the total area of which is some 2,100 square miles (5,439 square km), lies outside the zone of historic volcanic activity. Because there are few rivers, there is a lack of…

  • Selasphorus platycercus (bird)

    hummingbird: The broad-tailed hummingbird (S. platycercus) breeds in the western United States and Central America and the Allen’s hummingbird breeds in the coastal regions of California.

  • Selasphorus rufus (bird)

    hummingbird: …hummingbird is the rufous (Selasphorus rufus), which breeds from southeastern Alaska to northern California. The broad-tailed hummingbird (S. platycercus) breeds in the western United States and Central America and the Allen’s hummingbird breeds in the coastal regions of California.

  • Selasphorus sasin (bird)

    hummingbird: …and Central America and the Allen’s hummingbird breeds in the coastal regions of California.

  • Selassie, Haile (emperor of Ethiopia)

    Haile Selassie I, emperor of Ethiopia from 1930 to 1974 who sought to modernize his country and who steered it into the mainstream of post-World War II African politics. He brought Ethiopia into the League of Nations and the United Nations and made Addis Ababa the major centre for the Organization

  • Selassie, Sahle (king of Ethiopia)

    Sahle Selassie, ruler (1813–47) of the kingdom of Shewa (Shoa), Ethiopia. He was the grandfather of Emperor Menilek II (reigned 1889–1913) and the great-grandfather of Emperor Haile Selassie I. His name means “Clemency of the Trinity.” A member of the Amhara royal family, Sahle Selassie ruled the

  • Selat Makassar (strait, Indonesia)

    Makassar Strait, narrow passage of the west-central Pacific Ocean, Indonesia. Extending 500 miles (800 km) northeast–southwest from the Celebes Sea to the Java Sea, the strait passes between Borneo on the west and Celebes on the east and is 80 to 230 miles (130 to 370 km) wide. It is a deep

  • Selat Sunda (channel, Indonesia)

    Sunda Strait, channel, 16–70 miles (26–110 km) wide, between the islands of Java (east) and Sumatra, that links the Java Sea (Pacific Ocean) with the Indian Ocean (south). There are several volcanic islands within the strait, the most famous of which is Krakatoa, which erupted on August 27, 1883,

  • Selayar (island, Indonesia)

    Selayar, largest of an island group off the southwestern tip of Celebes (Sulawesi), which is administered from Makassar as part of South Sulawesi propinsi (province), Indonesia. The other islands are Pasi, Bahuluang, Pulasi, and Tambulongang. All the islands are mountainous, but fertile lowlands

  • Selberg sieve (mathematics)

    Atle Selberg: …the study of sieves—particularly the Selberg sieve—which are generalizations of Eratosthenes’ method for locating prime numbers. In 1949 he gave an elementary (but by no means simple) proof of the prime number theorem, a result that had theretofore required advanced theorems from analysis. Many of Selberg’s papers were published in…

  • Selberg, Atle (American mathematician)

    Atle Selberg, Norwegian-born American mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1950 for his work in number theory. In 1986 he shared (with Samuel Eilenberg) the Wolf Prize. Selberg attended the University of Oslo (Ph.D., 1943) and remained there as a research fellow until 1947. He then

  • Selborne, Roundell Palmer, 1st Earl of (British jurist)

    Roundell Palmer, 1st earl of Selborne, British lord high chancellor (1872–74, 1880–85) who almost singlehandedly drafted a comprehensive judicial-reform measure, the Supreme Court of Judicature Act of 1873. Under this statute, the complex duality of English court systems—common law and chancery

  • Selborne, Roundell Palmer, 1st Earl of, Viscount Wolmer of Blackmoor, Baron Selborne of Selborne (British jurist)

    Roundell Palmer, 1st earl of Selborne, British lord high chancellor (1872–74, 1880–85) who almost singlehandedly drafted a comprehensive judicial-reform measure, the Supreme Court of Judicature Act of 1873. Under this statute, the complex duality of English court systems—common law and chancery

  • Selborne, William Waldegrave Palmer, 2nd Earl of (British statesman)

    William Waldegrave Palmer, 2nd earl of Selborne, first lord of the Admiralty (1900–05) in Great Britain and high commissioner for South Africa (1905–10), who helped initiate the rebuilding of the fleet into a force strong enough to oppose a greatly expanded German navy in World War I and who

  • Selborne, William Waldegrave Palmer, 2nd Earl of, Viscount Wolmer of Blackmoor, Baron Selborne of Selborne (British statesman)

    William Waldegrave Palmer, 2nd earl of Selborne, first lord of the Admiralty (1900–05) in Great Britain and high commissioner for South Africa (1905–10), who helped initiate the rebuilding of the fleet into a force strong enough to oppose a greatly expanded German navy in World War I and who

  • Selbsthilfebund der K?rperbehinderten (German organization)

    Otto Perl: …author and cofounder of the Selbsthilfebund der K?rperbehinderten (Self-Help Alliance of the Physically Handicapped, or Otto Perl Alliance; 1919–31), the first emancipatory self-help organization representing the interests of the physically disabled in Germany.

  • Selby (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Selby: district, administrative county of North Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, northern England, just south of York. It lies mainly in the floodplain of the Rivers Aire and Ouse.

  • Selby (England, United Kingdom)

    Selby, town (parish) and district, administrative county of North Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, northern England, just south of York. It lies mainly in the floodplain of the Rivers Aire and Ouse. The district includes pre-Norman settlements along the right bank of the River Ouse, the

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