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  • Selim II (Ottoman sultan)

    Selim II, Ottoman sultan from 1566, whose reign saw peace in Europe and Asia and the rise of the Ottomans to dominance in the Mediterranean but marked the beginning of the decline in the power of the sultans. He was unable to impose his authority over the Janissaries and was overruled by the women

  • Selim III (Ottoman sultan)

    Selim III, Ottoman sultan from 1789 to 1807, who undertook a program of Westernization and whose reign felt the intellectual and political ferment created by the French Revolution. A poet and an accomplished composer of Ottoman classical music, Selim had enjoyed greater freedom prior to his

  • Selim Mosque (mosque, Istanbul, Turkey)

    Islamic arts: Architecture: …Bayezid Mosque (after 1491), the Selim Mosque (1522), the ?ehzade külliye (1548), and the Süleyman külliye (after 1550). The ?ehzade and Süleyman külliyes were built by Sinan, the greatest Ottoman architect, whose masterpiece is the Selim Mosque at Edirne, Turkey (1569–75).

  • Selim the Grim (Ottoman sultan)

    Selim I, Ottoman sultan (1512–20) who extended the empire to Syria, the Hejaz, and Egypt and raised the Ottomans to leadership of the Muslim world. Selim came to the throne in the wake of civil strife in which he, his brother, and their father, Bayezid II, had been involved. Selim eliminated all p

  • Selim, Mosque of (mosque, Edirne, Turkey)

    Mosque of Selim, monumental mosque, Edirne, Turkey. It is considered to be the masterwork of the great Ottoman architect Sinan. The mosque lies at the summit of rising ground and dominates the city’s skyline. Construction began in 1569, during the reign of the sultan Selim II, and was completed in

  • Selima Sand Sheet (geological feature, Africa)

    sand dune: A few, such as the Selima Sand Sheet in southwestern Egypt and the northwestern Sudan, are probably almost as extensive as some of the great sand seas.

  • Selimiye (Turkey)

    Side, principal city and port of ancient Pamphylia, originally situated on the Mediterranean coast west of the mouth of the Manavgat River, in southwestern Turkey. (The site is now inland.) Though the city was founded by Aeolian Greeks, a peculiar non-Greek language was spoken there. Having a good

  • Selimiye Cami (mosque, Edirne, Turkey)

    Mosque of Selim, monumental mosque, Edirne, Turkey. It is considered to be the masterwork of the great Ottoman architect Sinan. The mosque lies at the summit of rising ground and dominates the city’s skyline. Construction began in 1569, during the reign of the sultan Selim II, and was completed in

  • Selimiye Mosque (mosque, Nicosia, Cyprus)

    Nicosia: …name was changed to the Selimiye Mosque in honour of the Ottoman sultan Selim II, under whose reign Cyprus was conquered.

  • Selina Kyle (fictional character)

    Catwoman, cartoon character, a wily and agile professional thief and sometime love interest of superhero Batman. Clad in a skintight bodysuit and stylized mask and carrying a whip, Selina Kyle, also known as Catwoman, has frequently crossed and recrossed the line between villain and antiheroine. In

  • Sélingué dam (dam, western Africa)

    Sankarani River: The Sélingué dam, which is located on the Sankarani, began operations in 1980 and is one of Mali’s most important energy sources.

  • Selinous (ancient city, Sicily)

    Selinus, ancient Greek city on the southern coast of Sicily, 8 miles (13 km) southeast of modern Castelvetrano. It is famous for its ruined Doric temples. Selinus was founded in 651 or 628 bce by colonists from Megara Hyblaea and from Megara in Greece. The city got its name from the wild celery

  • Selinunte (Italy)

    Selinus: The modern Italian town of Selinunte lies nearby.

  • Selinus (ancient city, Sicily)

    Selinus, ancient Greek city on the southern coast of Sicily, 8 miles (13 km) southeast of modern Castelvetrano. It is famous for its ruined Doric temples. Selinus was founded in 651 or 628 bce by colonists from Megara Hyblaea and from Megara in Greece. The city got its name from the wild celery

  • Seljuk (Turkish dynasty)

    Seljuq, ruling military family of the O?uz (Ghuzz) Turkic tribes that invaded southwestern Asia in the 11th century and eventually founded an empire that included Mesopotamia, Syria, Palestine, and most of Iran. Their advance marked the beginning of Turkish power in the Middle East. A brief

  • Seljuq (Turkish dynasty)

    Seljuq, ruling military family of the O?uz (Ghuzz) Turkic tribes that invaded southwestern Asia in the 11th century and eventually founded an empire that included Mesopotamia, Syria, Palestine, and most of Iran. Their advance marked the beginning of Turkish power in the Middle East. A brief

  • Selk?meri (sea, Europe)

    Bothnian Sea, the southern part of the Gulf of Bothnia, the northern arm of the Baltic Sea, which lies between Finland and

  • Selket (Egyptian goddess)

    Selket, in Egyptian mythology, goddess of the dead. Her symbolic animal was the scorpion. She was one of the underworld deities charged with protecting the canopic jar in which the intestines of the deceased were stored after

  • Selkirk (Manitoba, Canada)

    Manitoba: Settlement patterns: …service town in west-central Manitoba; Selkirk, the centre of commercial fishing and water transportation on Lake Winnipeg; and several service towns, such as Steinbach and Morden, in the southeastern region.

  • Selkirk (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Selkirkshire, historic county in southeastern Scotland, occupying a rolling upland region dissected by the valleys of the Ettrick and Yarrow waters (rivers), which merge in the east with the River Tweed. Selkirkshire lies entirely within the Scottish Borders council area. Archaeological evidence

  • Selkirk (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Selkirk, royal burgh (town), Scottish Borders council area, historic county of Selkirkshire, Scotland, lying on a hillside overlooking the river known as Ettrick Water. A Benedictine abbey founded in the early 12th century was later removed to Kelso. Selkirk’s 12th-century castle was captured by

  • Selkirk Mountains (mountain range, Canada-United States)

    Selkirk Mountains, major subdivision of the Columbia Mountains, extending for 200 miles (320 km) in a southeasterly arc, mostly in British Columbia, Canada, and just across the U.S. border into northern Idaho and Washington. Bounded by the Purcell Mountains (east) and the Columbia River (west and

  • Selkirk, Alexander (Scottish sailor)

    Alexander Selkirk, Scottish sailor who was the prototype of the marooned traveler in Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe (1719). The son of a shoemaker, Selkirk ran away to sea in 1695; he joined a band of buccaneers in the Pacific and by 1703 was sailing master of a galley on a privateering

  • Selkirk, Fort (fort, Yukon, Canada)

    Yukon River: History: …established a trading post at Fort Selkirk, at the junction of the Pelly and Yukon rivers, in order to trade with the local Indians. In 1851 Campbell explored the Yukon downstream to the junction of the Porcupine River, where Fort Yukon had been built in 1847. When the trading post…

  • Selkirk, Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of, Lord Daer and Shortcleuch (Scottish philanthropist)

    Thomas Douglas, 5th earl of Selkirk, Scottish philanthropist who in 1812 founded the Red River Settlement (q.v.; Assiniboia) in Canada, which grew to become part of the city of Winnipeg, Man. Selkirk succeeded to the Scottish earldom on the death of his father in 1799, all of his elder brothers

  • Selkirkshire (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Selkirkshire, historic county in southeastern Scotland, occupying a rolling upland region dissected by the valleys of the Ettrick and Yarrow waters (rivers), which merge in the east with the River Tweed. Selkirkshire lies entirely within the Scottish Borders council area. Archaeological evidence

  • Selkup (people)

    Selkup, an indigenous Arctic people who traditionally resided in central Russia between the Ob and the Yenisey rivers. They numbered more than 4,000 in the Russian census of 2002. The Selkup language, divided into several dialects, is one of the few surviving languages of the Southern Samoyedic

  • Selkup language

    Uralic languages: Current distribution: The fourth language, Selkup, lies to the south in a region between the central Ob and central Yenisey; its major representation is located between Turukhansk and the Taz River. A fifth Samoyedic language, Kamas (Sayan), spoken in the vicinity of the Sayan Mountains, survived into the 20th century…

  • Sell, Hildegarde Loretta (American cabaret performer)

    Hildegarde, (Hildegarde Loretta Sell), American cabaret performer (born Feb. 1, 1906, Adell, Wis.—died July 29, 2005, New York, N.Y.), had a career that spanned nearly seven decades, during which she was internationally known—especially at her peak in the 1930s and ’40s—for her stylish, s

  • sella curulis

    Curule chair, a style of chair reserved in ancient Rome for the use of the highest government dignitaries and usually made like a campstool with curved legs. Ordinarily made of ivory, with or without arms, it probably derived its name from the chariot (currus) in which a magistrate was conveyed t

  • sella turcica (anatomy)

    pituitary tumour: …cause of enlargement of the sella turcica, the bone cavity in the head in which the pituitary gland is located. There are two general types of pituitary tumours—hormone secreting and nonsecreting. There are five types of hormone-secreting pituitary tumours, named according to the cells that produce the particular hormone. They…

  • Sella, Quintino (Italian statesman)

    Quintino Sella, statesman who helped place the new national government on a firm financial footing after the unification of Italy. Educated for the engineering profession, Sella taught at Turin for several years before entering politics. In 1860 he was elected to the Piedmontese Chamber of

  • sellar joint (anatomy)

    joint: Sellar joint: The sellar joint has already been described in the section Articular cartilage. It has two types of movement, both swings: flexion-extension and abduction-adduction. In addition to these it allows movements combining these two—that is, swings accompanied by rotation of the moving bone. An…

  • Sellards, Andrew (American physician)

    cholera: Development of treatments: …at Calcutta Medical College, and Andrew Sellards, an American in Manila. Rogers developed a replacement fluid that contained a much higher salt content than had previously been used and that resulted in a halving of cholera deaths—from a 60 percent mortality rate down to 30 percent. Sellards suggested that sodium…

  • Sellars, Peter (American director)

    Peter Sellars, American stage director. He is best known for staging plays and operas for numerous international theatres in settings far different than those suggested by the text. Sellars attended Harvard University, where he began developing his innovative style of directing. His controversial

  • Sellars, Wilfrid (American philosopher)

    Wilfrid Sellars, American philosopher best known for his critique of traditional philosophical conceptions of mind and knowledge and for his uncompromising effort to explain how human reason and thought can be reconciled with the vision of nature found in science. Although he was one of the most

  • Sellars, Wilfrid Stalker (American philosopher)

    Wilfrid Sellars, American philosopher best known for his critique of traditional philosophical conceptions of mind and knowledge and for his uncompromising effort to explain how human reason and thought can be reconciled with the vision of nature found in science. Although he was one of the most

  • Sellasse, Heruy Walda (Ethiopian author)

    African literature: Ethiopian: Heruy Walda Sellasse, an Ethiopian foreign minister who became the country’s first major writer, wrote two novels that are critical of child marriage and that extol Christianity and Western technology. But he was also critical of the Christian church and proposed in one of his…

  • Selle, Massif de la (mountains, Hispaniola)

    Sierra de Baoruco, mountain range in the southwestern part of the Dominican Republic. It extends about 50 mi (80 km) east from the Haitian border to the Caribbean Sea and lies parallel to the Cordillera Central. Its highest peak is 5,348 ft (1,630 m). Straddling the Haitian border, the range is

  • Selle, Mount (mountain, Haiti)

    Hispaniola: …southwestern peninsula, which rises to Mount Selle at 8,773 feet (2,674 metres). In contrast to the highlands, the basin of Lake Enriquillo in southwestern Dominican Republic is quite low, the surface of the lake being about 150 feet (45 metres) below sea level. The main rivers are the Yaque del…

  • Selle, Thomas (German composer)

    Passion music: Matthew Passion setting of Thomas Selle (1599–1663) uses a double chorus extensively, while his setting of the St. John Passion incorporates instruments and a “distant choir.” Contrast between the interlocutors is achieved by assigning particular instruments or groups to different characters. Chorales, or hymn tunes, were introduced into the…

  • seller concentration (economics)

    monopoly and competition: Concentration of sellers: Seller concentration refers to the number of sellers in an industry together with their comparative shares of industry sales. When the number of sellers is quite large, and each seller’s share of the market is so small that in practice he cannot,…

  • Sellers, John (American jockey)

    Carry Back: His jockey, John Sellers, found himself and the colt in a scramble of horses early on and sent Carry Back to the outside, where he had room to put his speed to work. The colt ran down the opposition with a spectacular burst in the homestretch to…

  • Sellers, Peter (British actor)

    Peter Sellers, versatile English comic actor whose astonishing range of characters earned him international stardom at a time when rigid typecasting was usual. Sellers was a descendant of legendary Portuguese-Jewish prizefighter Daniel Mendoza and the son of British vaudeville performers. After

  • Sellers, Richard Henry (British actor)

    Peter Sellers, versatile English comic actor whose astonishing range of characters earned him international stardom at a time when rigid typecasting was usual. Sellers was a descendant of legendary Portuguese-Jewish prizefighter Daniel Mendoza and the son of British vaudeville performers. After

  • Sellers, William (American engineer and manufacturer)

    William Sellers, American engineer and manufacturer. Sellers was born into a distinguished scientific family. The first of his firms manufactured machinists’ tools and mill gearing. His formulas for matching screw threads and nuts (1864) became the U.S. standards. In 1868 he founded Edge Moor Iron

  • selling (business)

    property: “Sale,” the voluntary exchange of property for money, is the most common of these. A “donation,” or gift, is another voluntary form. Succession to property upon death of the previous owner is a central concept in nearly all property systems and falls into the category…

  • Selling of the Pentagon, The (American television documentary [1971])

    Television in the United States: Media versus the federal government: …day, the most controversial was The Selling of the Pentagon (CBS, 1971), which reported on pro-Vietnam War government propaganda and on the relationship between the Pentagon and its corporate contractors. Controversy over the show—especially accusations that interviews had been edited in a way that distorted the meaning of what had…

  • Selling of the President, 1968, The (book by McGinniss)

    The Selling of the President, 1968, nonfictional book about the 1968 presidential campaign of Richard M. Nixon written by American author Joe McGinniss that became one of the most-influential books on the campaigns of American presidential candidates. The book became a New York Times best seller in

  • selling short (economics)

    bear market: …price, a speculative transaction called selling short. The term bear may derive from the proverb about “selling the bearskin before one has caught the bear” or perhaps from selling when one is “bare” of stock. Compare bull market.

  • selloum philodendron (plant)

    philodendron: Major species: …(24 inches) long, and the tree philodendron (P. bipinnatifidum), with deeply cut leaves up to 1 metre (3 feet) long, both of which are striking plants that require considerable indoor space.

  • Selma (Alabama, United States)

    Selma, city, seat (1865) of Dallas county, central Alabama, U.S. It lies on the Alabama River about 50 miles (80 km) west of Montgomery. The site was first recorded on a map in 1732 as Ecor Bienville; it was later called Moore’s Bluff, for a settler who arrived about 1815. It was renamed about 1819

  • Selma (film by DuVernay [2014])

    John Legend: …by them for the film Selma (2014). The song, which invokes a call to end racial injustice, won both a Golden Globe Award and an Academy Award for best original song. Legend’s fifth studio album, Darkness and Light (2016), yielded the hit song “Love Me Now” and featured collaborations with…

  • Selma March (United States history)

    Selma March, political march from Selma, Alabama, to the state’s capital, Montgomery, that occurred March 21–25, 1965. Led by Martin Luther King, Jr., the march was the culminating event of several tumultuous weeks during which demonstrators twice attempted to march but were stopped, once

  • Selma to Montgomery March (United States history)

    Selma March, political march from Selma, Alabama, to the state’s capital, Montgomery, that occurred March 21–25, 1965. Led by Martin Luther King, Jr., the march was the culminating event of several tumultuous weeks during which demonstrators twice attempted to march but were stopped, once

  • Selma-to-Montgomery National Historic Trail (historical trail, Alabama, United States)

    Selma March: How Long, Not Long: Selma to Montgomery: …act of Congress created the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail. An interpretive centre operated by the National Park Service is located in Lowndes county at roughly the halfway point between Selma and Montgomery.

  • Selmi, Francesco (Italian chemist)

    Francesco Selmi, Italian chemist and toxicologist who is considered one of the founders of colloid chemistry. Selmi held several teaching positions in Turin and Modena before accepting the post of professor of chemical pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Bologna in 1867. He published

  • Selmon, Lee Roy (American football player)

    Lee Roy Selmon, American football player (born Oct. 20, 1954, Eufaula, Okla.—died Sept. 4, 2011, Tampa, Fla.), was a hard-hitting, imposing defensive end who was credited with 23 sacks during his professional NFL career (1976–84) with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Selmon played college football with

  • Selo zad sedumte jaseni (work by Janevski)

    Macedonian literature: …of the first Macedonian novel, Selo zad sedumte jaseni (1952; “The Village Beyond the Seven Ash Trees”). His most ambitious work was a cycle of six novels that deals with Macedonian history and includes Tvrdoglavi (1965; “The Stubborn Ones”), a novel articulating the Macedonian people’s myths and legends of remembering…

  • Selong language

    Halang language, language spoken chiefly in the central highlands of south-central Vietnam near Kon Tum. The number of speakers in Vietnam is estimated at some 10,000. Halang is a member of the North Bahnaric subbranch of the Mon-Khmer language family, which is a part of the Austroasiatic stock.

  • Selonian (people)

    Baltic states: Early Middle Ages: …Latvia was inhabited by the Selonians and Latgalians. At least four major principalities can be distinguished among the latter.

  • Selormey, Francis (Ghanaian author)

    Francis Selormey, Ghanaian writer and teacher whose semiautobiographical novel, The Narrow Path: An African Childhood (1966), was hailed as a distinguished addition to African literature. Selormey began his career as a physical-education teacher and administrator. His first published work was “The

  • Selous Game Reserve (game reserve, Tanzania)

    Selous Game Reserve, huge game reserve, southeastern Tanzania. It is named after Frederick Selous, a naturalist, explorer, and soldier. It covers an area of more than 17,000 square miles (44,000 square km) and bestrides a complex of rivers including the Kilombero, Ruaha, and Rufiji. Its vegetation

  • Selous, Frederick Courteney (British explorer)

    Frederick Courteney Selous, hunter and explorer whose south-central African travels added substantially to knowledge of the country later known as Rhodesia. In 1871–72 Selous traveled from Cape Town to Matabeleland, where he was given permission to hunt freely. For 18 years Selous explored and

  • Selqet (Egyptian goddess)

    Selket, in Egyptian mythology, goddess of the dead. Her symbolic animal was the scorpion. She was one of the underworld deities charged with protecting the canopic jar in which the intestines of the deceased were stored after

  • SELS (meteorology)

    weather forecasting: Predictive skills and procedures: …with severe thunderstorms, sometimes called severe local storms (SELS) or simply severe weather. Forecasts and warnings also are made for tornadoes, those intense, rotating windstorms that represent the most violent end of the weather scale. Destruction of property and the risk of injury and death are extremely high in the…

  • Selseleh-ye Safīd Kūh (mountain range, Afghanistan)

    Herāt: …largest of these is the Selseleh-ye Safīd Kūh (Paropamisus Range). The province is traversed from east to west by the Harīrūd (river), along which most of the people live in agricultural oases. The capital, located in the largest oasis, is a centre of Afghan trade with Iran and Turkmenistan and…

  • Selten, Reinhard (German mathematician)

    Reinhard Selten, German mathematician who shared the 1994 Nobel Prize for Economics with John F. Nash and John C. Harsanyi for their development of game theory, a branch of mathematics that examines rivalries between competitors with mixed interests. Selten’s father was Jewish, and as a result,

  • Selten, Reinhard Justus Reginald (German mathematician)

    Reinhard Selten, German mathematician who shared the 1994 Nobel Prize for Economics with John F. Nash and John C. Harsanyi for their development of game theory, a branch of mathematics that examines rivalries between competitors with mixed interests. Selten’s father was Jewish, and as a result,

  • Selukwe (Zimbabwe)

    Shurugwi, town, central Zimbabwe. Shurugwi was established in 1899 by the British South Africa Company and Willoughby’s Consolidated Company. Its name was derived from a nearby bare oval granite hill that resembled the shape of a pigpen (selukwe) of the local Venda people. The town is the terminus

  • Selukwe Complex (geological feature, Africa)

    Precambrian: Age and occurrence of greenstone-granite belts: …over three successive periods: the Selukwe belt about 3.8 to 3.75 billion years ago, the Belingwean belts about 2.9 billion years ago, and the Bulawayan-Shamvaian belts about 2.7 to 2.6 billion years ago. The Barberton belt in the Kaapvaal craton and the Warrawoona belt in the Pilbara block are 3.5…

  • selva (marsupial)

    Rat opossum, (family Caenolestidae), any of six species of South American marsupials in the order Paucituberculata. Rat opossums include the common shrew opossums (genus Caenolestes) with four species, the Incan caenolestid (Lestoros inca), and the Chilean shrew opossum (Rhyncholestes raphanurus).

  • selva

    Status of the World's Tropical Forests: As recently as the 19th century tropical forests covered approximately 20 percent of the dry land area on Earth. By the end of the 20th century this figure had dropped to less than 7 percent. The factors contributing to deforestation are numerous, complex, and often…

  • selva, A (work by Ferreira de Castro)

    José Maria Ferreira de Castro: Two novels—Emigrantes (1928; “Emigrants”) and A selva (1930; “The Jungle,” translated into more than a dozen languages)—launched Ferreira de Castro’s literary career and offered an almost photographic portrayal of an exotic region and its human tensions and high drama. In later novels the author turned his attention to regional Portuguese…

  • selvage

    weaving: …avoids raveling; these are called selvages. They run lengthwise, parallel to the warp yarns. The three basic weaves are plain, twill, and satin. Fancy weaves—such as pile, Jacquard, dobby, and leno—require more complicated looms or special loom attachments for their construction.

  • selvage cable

    cable: Selvage cables composed of parallel wires are ideally suited for the main cables of a suspension bridge. Marine ropes are used for rigging, mooring, and towing.

  • Selvagens (islands, Portugal)

    Madeira Islands: …groups, the Desertas and the Selvagens. The islands are the summits of mountains that have their bases on an abyssal ocean floor. Administratively, they form the autonomous region of Madeira. The regional capital, Funchal, is located on Madeira Island.

  • Selvaje, Academia (Spanish literary group)

    Miguel de Cervantes: Publication of Don Quixote: …of his attendance at the Academia Selvaje, a kind of writers’ salon, in 1612.

  • Selvon, Samuel (Caribbean author)

    Samuel Selvon, Caribbean novelist and short-story writer of East Indian descent, known for his vivid evocation of the life of East Indians living in the West Indies and elsewhere. He came to public attention during the 1950s with a number of other Caribbean writers, including V.S. Naipaul. Selvon

  • Selvon, Samuel Dickson (Caribbean author)

    Samuel Selvon, Caribbean novelist and short-story writer of East Indian descent, known for his vivid evocation of the life of East Indians living in the West Indies and elsewhere. He came to public attention during the 1950s with a number of other Caribbean writers, including V.S. Naipaul. Selvon

  • Selway, Phil (British musician)

    Radiohead: April 15, 1968, Oxford), drummer Phil Selway (b. May 23, 1967, Hemingford Grey, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire), and guitarist-keyboardist Jonny Greenwood (b. November 5, 1971, Oxford).

  • Selwyn Mountains (mountains, Canada)

    Selwyn Mountains, mountain range in Yukon and Northwest Territories, northwestern Canada. Part of the Rockies, they trend northwest-southeast and rise to 9,750 feet (2,972 metres) in Keele

  • Selwyn, George Augustus (New Zealand bishop)

    George Augustus Selwyn, first Anglican bishop of New Zealand. Selwyn was educated at Eton and St. John’s College, Cambridge. In 1833 he was ordained a deacon and became a curate at Windsor. He was made bishop of New Zealand in 1841. He learned to preach in Maori and to sail his own vessel among the

  • Selwyn-Lloyd, John Selwyn Brooke, Baron of Wirral (British statesman)

    Selwyn Lloyd, British Conservative politician who was foreign secretary during Britain’s diplomatic humiliation in the Suez crisis of 1956 and later chancellor of the exchequer under Prime Minister Harold Macmillan. Lloyd studied law at Cambridge and was called to the bar in 1930. After World War

  • Selye, Hans (Austrian endocrinologist)

    Hans Selye, endocrinologist known for his studies of the effects of stress on the human body. Selye was educated at the German University of Prague (M.D., 1929; Ph.D., 1931) and at the universities of Paris and Rome. In 1931 he came to the United States to work as a research fellow at Johns Hopkins

  • Selye, Hans Hugo Bruno (Austrian endocrinologist)

    Hans Selye, endocrinologist known for his studies of the effects of stress on the human body. Selye was educated at the German University of Prague (M.D., 1929; Ph.D., 1931) and at the universities of Paris and Rome. In 1931 he came to the United States to work as a research fellow at Johns Hopkins

  • Selz, Otto (German psychologist)

    thought: The process of thought: The German psychologist Otto Selz countered that in many situations this kind of theory would imply the occurrence of errors as often as correct answers to questions and thus was untenable. Selz contended that response selection depends rather on a process of “complex completion” that is set in…

  • Selzer, Richard Sylvan (American fashion designer and Hollywood tastemaker)

    Mr. Blackwell, (Richard Sylvan Selzer), American fashion designer and Hollywood tastemaker (born Aug. 29, 1922, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Oct. 19, 2008, Los Angeles, Calif.), attracted media and public attention for his annual “10 Worst Dressed Women’s List,” in which he used his biting wit to pillory

  • Selznick, David O. (American film producer)

    David O. Selznick, American motion-picture producer who earned a reputation for commercially successful films of high artistic quality before and after World War II. Selznick received his early training in motion pictures from his father, Lewis J. Selznick, a producer of silent films in New York

  • Selznick, Philip (American sociologist and legal scholar)

    organizational analysis: Theoretical developments: …American sociologist and legal scholar Philip Selznick, like Michels, emphasized the nonrational aspects of organizations. Using the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as an example, he argued that one of the most important features of organizations is the tendency for structures and processes to become “infused with value beyond the technical…

  • SEM (instrument)

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM), type of electron microscope, designed for directly studying the surfaces of solid objects, that utilizes a beam of focused electrons of relatively low energy as an electron probe that is scanned in a regular manner over the specimen. The electron source and

  • SEM (statistics)

    Standard error of measurement (SEM), the standard deviation of error of measurement in a test or experiment. It is closely associated with the error variance, which indicates the amount of variability in a test administered to a group that is caused by measurement error. The standard error of

  • Sema (people)

    Nagaland: Cultural life: …and hereditary chieftainships of the Semas and Changs to the democratic structures of the Angamis, Aos, Lothas, and Rengmas. A prominent village institution is the morung (a communal house or dormitory for young unmarried men), where skulls and other trophies of war formerly were hung. The pillars are still carved…

  • Semaeostomeae (invertebrate order)

    cnidarian: Annotated classification: Order Semaeostomeae Most common and best known jellyfishes. Full alternation of polyp and medusa stages. Bell domed or flattened, with the margin scalloped into 8 or more sections. Edges of single mouth drawn out into 4 long arms. Most species in warm, coastal waters, a few…

  • Semafory (poetry by Wa?yk)

    Adam Wa?yk: Wa?yk’s earliest volumes of poetry, Semafory (1924; “Semaphores”) and Oczy i usta (1926; “Eyes and Lips”), were written between the ages of 17 and 20 and reflect the instability of life in Poland after World War I and the pervasive sense of loss left in its wake. Wa?yk was closely…

  • Semai language

    Austroasiatic languages: Morphology: …of noun phrases (possessives in Semai, demonstratives in Mnong), but these do not constitute word suffixes. (2) Infixes and prefixes are common, so that only the final vowel and consonant of a word root remain untouched. It is rare to find more than one or two affixes (i.e., prefixes or…

  • Semaine, La (poem by Bartas)

    Guillaume de Salluste, seigneur du Bartas: …July 1590, Coudons), author of La Semaine (1578), an influential poem about the creation of the world.

  • semali (Banda society)

    Banda: Age grades and initiations called semali assured intergroup unity in time of war. Marriage traditionally required bridewealth, often in iron implements. Polygyny, although still practiced, has declined with the rise of a money-based economy.

  • Semana de Arte Moderna (Brazilian art)

    Modernismo: …gained wide recognition with its Semana de Arte Moderna (“Week of Modern Art”), an event held in S?o Paulo in 1922, provoking controversy with lectures on the aims of Modernism and readings from works by such Modernist poets as Mário de Andrade (q.v.).

  • Semang (people)

    Semang, people who live mostly in peninsular Malaysia and speak an Austro-Asiatic language. In the early 21st century their population was estimated to be approximately 2,000. They are traditional nomadic hunters, using blowguns to hunt small game, and gatherers of wild roots and fruits. Most

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