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  • Usolje-Sibirskoje (Russia)

    Usolye-Sibirskoye, city, Irkutsk oblast (region), east-central Russia. It lies along the Angara River and the Trans-Siberian Railroad. The city is an old centre of salt production that continues as a major producer of caustic soda. Other plants produce machinery and synthetic rubber. A health

  • Usolye-Sibirskoye (Russia)

    Usolye-Sibirskoye, city, Irkutsk oblast (region), east-central Russia. It lies along the Angara River and the Trans-Siberian Railroad. The city is an old centre of salt production that continues as a major producer of caustic soda. Other plants produce machinery and synthetic rubber. A health

  • Usos amorosos de la postguerra espa?ola (essay by Martín Gaite)

    Spanish literature: The novel: …de la postguerra espa?ola (1987; Courtship Customs in Postwar Spain), which describes the ideological indoctrination to which the Falange subjected girls and young women. Although he published his first novel in 1943, Gonzalo Torrente Ballester came to prominence only in the 1970s. He moved from Joycean models to realism to…

  • USP (university, S?o Paulo, Brazil)

    Brazil: Higher education: The University of S?o Paulo is the largest and most important state university. The largest private university is Paulista University, also located in S?o Paulo.

  • USPD (political party, Germany)

    Social Democratic Party of Germany: History: …of the vote (while the Independent Social Democrats received another 7.6 percent), but the party’s failure to win favourable terms from the Allies at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919 (terms embodied in the Treaty of Versailles) and the country’s severe economic problems led to a drop in support. Nevertheless,…

  • Uspensky Sobor (cathedral, Moscow, Russia)

    Moscow: The Kremlin: The Cathedral of the Assumption is the oldest, built of white stone in 1475–79 in the Italianate-Byzantine style. Its pure, simple, and beautifully proportioned lines and elegant arches are crowned by five golden domes. The Orthodox metropolitans and patriarchs of the 14th to 18th centuries are…

  • Uspensky, Gleb Ivanovich (Russian author)

    Gleb Ivanovich Uspensky, Russian intellectual and writer whose realistic portrayals of peasant life did much to correct the prevalent romantic view of the Russian agricultural worker. Uspensky studied law at the Universities of Moscow and St. Petersburg and for a time worked as a teacher. His first

  • USPS

    postal system: United States: …a government-owned corporation, called the United States Postal Service. Congress no longer retains power to fix postal tariffs (although changes may be vetoed) or to control employees’ salaries, and political patronage has been virtually eliminated. Government subsidies continued on a declining basis until 1982, after which the U.S. Postal Service…

  • Usque, Samuel (Portuguese writer)

    Portuguese literature: The novel and other prose: …are several masterly prose stylists: Samuel Usque with his Consola?am às tribula??ens de Israel (1553; “Consolation for the Tribulations of Israel”), a pastoral dialogue on the sufferings of the Jewish people; Heitor Pinto with his Imagem da vida Crist? (part I 1563, part II 1572; “Image of the Christian Life”);…

  • USS (American corporation)

    United States Steel Corporation, leading U.S. producer of steel and related products, founded in 1901. At the beginning of the 20th century, a number of businessmen were involved in the formation of United States Steel Corporation, including Andrew Carnegie, Elbert H. Gary, Charles M. Schwab, and

  • USS Arizona Memorial (museum, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, United States)

    USS Arizona: Wreckage and memorial: On May 30, 1962, the USS Arizona Memorial was officially dedicated. The white concrete and steel structure is 184 feet (56 metres) long and spans the wreckage. It was designed by Alfred Preis, an Austrian-born architect who was sent to a U.S. internment camp after the Pearl Harbor attack. His…

  • USS Cole (United States naval destroyer)

    USS Cole attack: naval destroyer, the USS Cole, on October 12, 2000. Suicide bombers in a small boat steered their craft into the side of the USS Cole, which was preparing to refuel in the harbour in the Yemeni port of Aden; the blast ripped a 1,600-square-foot (150-square-metre) hole in its hull…

  • USS Cole attack ([2000])

    USS Cole attack, attack by Muslim militants associated with the organization al-Qaeda against a U.S. naval destroyer, the USS Cole, on October 12, 2000. Suicide bombers in a small boat steered their craft into the side of the USS Cole, which was preparing to refuel in the harbour in the Yemeni port

  • USS Indianapolis (United States Navy heavy cruiser)

    USS Indianapolis, U.S. Navy heavy cruiser that was sunk by a Japanese submarine on July 30, 1945, shortly after delivering the internal components of the atomic bombs that were later dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Up to 900 men initially survived the sinking, but many succumbed to shark

  • USS Minnesota (United States battleship)

    Battle of the Monitor and Merrimack: …frigate Congress, while the frigate Minnesota ran aground.

  • Ussachevsky, Vladimir (American composer)

    Vladimir Ussachevsky, American composer known for his experiments with music for the tape recorder, often combined with live sound. The son of Russian parents, Ussachevsky entered the United States in 1931 and thereupon studied at Pomona College, Claremont, California, and at the Eastman School of

  • Ussher, James (Anglo-Irish prelate)

    James Ussher, Anglo-Irish prelate of the Anglican church who was memorable for his activity in religious politics and for his work on patristic texts, especially the chronology of the Old Testament. Ordained priest in 1601, Ussher became professor (1607–21) and twice vice-chancellor (1614, 1617) at

  • Ussing, Hans (Danish biophysicist)

    biophysics: Biological membranes: …in this subject; his pupil, Hans Ussing, developed the conceptual means by which the transport of ions (charged atoms) across membranes can be identified. Ussing’s definition of active transport made possible an understanding, at the cellular level, of the way in which ions and water are pumped into and out…

  • Ussuri moose (mammal)

    moose: alces pfizenmayeri); the west Siberian, or Ussuri, moose (A. alces cameloides); and the east Siberian, or Kolyma, moose (A. alces buturlini). In addition to differences in geographical distribution, the different subspecies of moose are further distinguished by features such as size, pelage, and antler characteristics. The differences in…

  • Ussuri raccoon (canine)

    Raccoon dog, (Nyctereutes procyonoides), member of the dog family (Canidae) native to eastern Asia and introduced into Europe. Some authorities place it in the raccoon family, Procyonidae. It resembles the raccoon in having dark facial markings that contrast with its yellowish brown coat, but it

  • Ussuri River (river, Asia)

    Ussuri River, northward-flowing tributary of the Amur River that for a considerable distance forms the boundary between China (Heilongjiang province) and Russia (Siberia). The Ussuri is formed by the confluence of the Sungacha (Song’acha) River, the outlet of Lake Khanka (Xingkai); and the Ulakhe

  • Ussuri sika (mammal)

    sika: …the northern sikas, such as Dybowski’s sika (C. nippon hortulorum), stand approximately 110 cm (40 inches) at the shoulder and weigh 110 kg (240 pounds). Females weigh about 60 percent as much as males. Their coats are reddish brown and spotted in summer and dark brown and sometimes without spots…

  • Ussurijsk (Russia)

    Ussuriysk, city, Primorsky kray (territory), far eastern Russia. It lies about 50 miles (80 km) north of Vladivostok along the Trans-Siberian Railroad at the junction with a line to Harbin in Heilongjiang province, China. Founded as the village of Nikolskoye in 1866, it became a city in 1897 and

  • Ussuriysk (Russia)

    Ussuriysk, city, Primorsky kray (territory), far eastern Russia. It lies about 50 miles (80 km) north of Vladivostok along the Trans-Siberian Railroad at the junction with a line to Harbin in Heilongjiang province, China. Founded as the village of Nikolskoye in 1866, it became a city in 1897 and

  • Ust-Abakanskoe (Russia)

    Abakan, city and administrative centre of the republic of Khakassia, south-central Russia. The city lies on the left bank of the Abakan River near its confluence with the Yenisey River. The starting point of a southern Siberian railway line (opened in 1960), Abakan is connected with Novokuznetsk

  • Ust-Ilimsk (Russia)

    Ust-Ilimsk, city and administrative centre of Ust-Ilimsk raion (sector), Irkutsk oblast (region), south-central Russia. It became a city in 1973 in connection with the building of the nearby Ust-Ilimsk dam and hydroelectric-power station on the Angara River. A huge timber-processing complex was

  • Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    ?skemen, city, capital of Shygys Qazaqstan oblysy (region), eastern Kazakhstan. It lies in the foothills of the Rūdnyy Altai Mountains and at the junction of the Ulba and Irtysh (Ertis) rivers. Founded as a Russian fort in 1720, it later became a centre of trade with Mongolia and China and the

  • Ust-Orda (Russia)

    Ust-Ordynsky, township and capital of the former Ust-Ordyn Buryat autonomous okrug (district), now merged with Irkutsk oblast (region), eastern Siberia, Russia. It lies on the Kuda River and on the road from Irkutsk to Kachug, west of Lake Baikal. It is a small settlement of administrative

  • Ust-Orda Buryat (former district, Russia)

    Ust-Ordyn Buryat, former autonomous okrug (district), south-central Siberia, Russia. In 2008 the district was absorbed by Irkutsk oblast (region). Ust-Ordyn Buryat lies west of Lake Baikal and extends across the Angara River. The okrug was created in 1937. Its plateau relief is partly in boreal

  • Ust-Ordinsky (Russia)

    Ust-Ordynsky, township and capital of the former Ust-Ordyn Buryat autonomous okrug (district), now merged with Irkutsk oblast (region), eastern Siberia, Russia. It lies on the Kuda River and on the road from Irkutsk to Kachug, west of Lake Baikal. It is a small settlement of administrative

  • Ust-Ordyn Buryat (former district, Russia)

    Ust-Ordyn Buryat, former autonomous okrug (district), south-central Siberia, Russia. In 2008 the district was absorbed by Irkutsk oblast (region). Ust-Ordyn Buryat lies west of Lake Baikal and extends across the Angara River. The okrug was created in 1937. Its plateau relief is partly in boreal

  • Ust-Ordynsky (Russia)

    Ust-Ordynsky, township and capital of the former Ust-Ordyn Buryat autonomous okrug (district), now merged with Irkutsk oblast (region), eastern Siberia, Russia. It lies on the Kuda River and on the road from Irkutsk to Kachug, west of Lake Baikal. It is a small settlement of administrative

  • Ust-Ordynsky Buryat (former district, Russia)

    Ust-Ordyn Buryat, former autonomous okrug (district), south-central Siberia, Russia. In 2008 the district was absorbed by Irkutsk oblast (region). Ust-Ordyn Buryat lies west of Lake Baikal and extends across the Angara River. The okrug was created in 1937. Its plateau relief is partly in boreal

  • Ust-Sysolsk (Russia)

    Syktyvkar, city and capital of Komi republic, northwestern Russia. It lies at the confluence of the Vychegda and Sysola rivers. It was founded in 1586 as Ust-Sysolsk and was made a city in 1780, but its remoteness hindered growth, and in fact it was used as a place of exile. In the 1960s a large

  • USTA (sports organization, United States)

    tennis: Origin and early years: …Association and, in 1975, the U.S. Tennis Association (USTA). Under its auspices, the first official U.S. national championship, played under English rules, was held in 1881 at the Newport Casino, Newport, Rhode Island. The winner, Richard Sears, was U.S. champion for seven consecutive years.

  • ustād (Urdu literature)

    South Asian arts: Urdu: …Urdu poets generally chose an ustād, or master, just as a ?ūfī novice chose a murshid, or preceptor, and one’s poetic genealogy was always a matter of much pride. Second, poets read poetry in private or semiprivate gatherings, called mushā?irah, which displayed hierarchies, status consciousness, and rivalries reminiscent of royal…

  • Ustād Junayd (Islamic painter)

    Junayd, painter of miniatures and leading illustrator of the Jalāyirid school. His style, using richly dressed figures in formal settings, deeply influenced later developments in Persian painting. Very little is known about Junayd’s life. He was a pupil of the painter Shams ad-Dīn, and from 1382 to

  • Ustād Kamāl ad-Dīn Behzād (Persian painter)

    Behzād, major Persian painter whose style as a miniaturist and work as a teacher were vital influences on Persian Islāmic painting. Orphaned at an early age, he was raised in the city of Herāt by the painter Mīrak Naqqāsh, who enjoyed the patronage of the Timurid princes who ruled the city. Behzād

  • Ustād Man?ūr (Indian painter)

    Man?ūr, a leading member of the 17th-century Jahāngīr studio of Mughal painters, famed for his animal and bird studies. The emperor Jahāngīr honoured him with the title Nādir al-?Asr (“Wonder of the Age”), and in his memoirs Jahāngīr praises Man?ūr as “unique in his generation” in the art of

  • Usta?a (Croatian political movement)

    Usta?a, Croatian fascist movement that nominally ruled the Independent State of Croatia during World War II. In 1929, when King Alexander I tried to suppress the conflict between Croatian and Serbian political parties by imposing a personal dictatorial regime in Yugoslavia, Ante Paveli?, a former

  • Usta?e (Croatian political movement)

    Usta?a, Croatian fascist movement that nominally ruled the Independent State of Croatia during World War II. In 1929, when King Alexander I tried to suppress the conflict between Croatian and Serbian political parties by imposing a personal dictatorial regime in Yugoslavia, Ante Paveli?, a former

  • Ustasha (Croatian political movement)

    Usta?a, Croatian fascist movement that nominally ruled the Independent State of Croatia during World War II. In 1929, when King Alexander I tried to suppress the conflict between Croatian and Serbian political parties by imposing a personal dictatorial regime in Yugoslavia, Ante Paveli?, a former

  • ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic)

    ústí nad Labem, city, northwestern Czech Republic. It is a port on the left (west) bank of the Elbe (Labe) River at the latter’s confluence with the Bílina River. Although dating from the 10th century, the city has developed mainly since the 19th century and has been largely reconstructed since

  • Ustilaginales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Ustilaginales Parasitic on plants, causing smut of many cereal grains, including wheat, barley, corn, and rice; masses of spores (sori) are usually black and dusty; basidial apparatus consisting of thick-walled teleutospore (probasidium), which upon germination gives rise to a septate or nonseptate tube (metabasidium) bearing…

  • Ustilaginomycetes (class of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Class Ustilaginomycetes Parasitic (dikaryotic phase) and saprotrophic (haploid phase); includes smut fungi; contains 3 orders. Order Urocystales Parasitic on plants such as arrowhead, causing blister smut, and wheat, causing flag smut; mycelia may form dense clusters in leaves and leaf stalks (petioles);

  • Ustilaginomycotina (subphylum of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Subphylum Ustilaginomycotina Parasitic on plants as dikaryotic hyphae; haploid yeast phase is saprotrophic; contains 2 classes. Class Ustilaginomycetes Parasitic (dikaryotic phase) and saprotrophic (haploid phase); includes smut fungi; contains 3 orders. Order Urocystales Parasitic

  • Ustilago maydis (fungus)

    corn smut: …disease caused by the fungus Ustilago maydis, which attacks corn (maize) and teosinte plants. The disease reduces corn yields and can cause economic losses, though in Mexico the immature galls of infected ears of corn are eaten as a delicacy known as huitlacoche.

  • Ustinov (Russia)

    Izhevsk, city and capital of Udmurtiya, in west-central Russia, lying along the Izh River. Izhevsk was founded in 1760 as a centre of ironworking and later of armaments, and the city remains a major producer of steel, armaments, machine tools, building machinery, and motorcycles. There is also a

  • Ustinov, Dmitry Fedorovich (Soviet statesman)

    Dmitry Fedorovich Ustinov, Soviet military and political figure who was minister of defense from 1976 to 1984. An engineer by profession, Ustinov graduated in 1934 from the Military Institute of Mechanics in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) and worked first as a construction engineer, then as

  • Ustinov, Peter (British actor, author, and director)

    Peter Ustinov, English actor, director, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, raconteur, and humanitarian. Ustinov’s grandfather was a Russian officer in the tsar’s army who was exiled because of his religious beliefs. “It is for that reason,” Ustinov later said, “that I am addressing you today in

  • Ustinov, Sir Peter Alexander (British actor, author, and director)

    Peter Ustinov, English actor, director, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, raconteur, and humanitarian. Ustinov’s grandfather was a Russian officer in the tsar’s army who was exiled because of his religious beliefs. “It is for that reason,” Ustinov later said, “that I am addressing you today in

  • üstirt Plateau (plateau, Central Asia)

    Ustyurt Plateau, plateau in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, lying between the Aral Sea and the Amu Darya (river) delta in the east and the Mangyshlak (Tupqarghan) Plateau and the Kara-Bogaz-Gol (Garabogazk?l; an inlet of the Caspian Sea) in the west. It has an area of about 77,000 square miles (about

  • Ustyurt Plateau (plateau, Central Asia)

    Ustyurt Plateau, plateau in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, lying between the Aral Sea and the Amu Darya (river) delta in the east and the Mangyshlak (Tupqarghan) Plateau and the Kara-Bogaz-Gol (Garabogazk?l; an inlet of the Caspian Sea) in the west. It has an area of about 77,000 square miles (about

  • Usual Suspects, The (film by Singer [1995])

    Benicio Del Toro: …Fenster in the crime drama The Usual Suspects (1995).

  • Usualmark (German currency)

    mark: These coins were called Usualmarks.

  • usucapio (Roman law)

    Roman law: The law of property and possession: Usucapio referred to ownership acquired by length of possession. In early Roman law, two years of continuous possession established title in the case of land, one year in the case of movables. In the developed law, possession must have begun justifiably in good faith, and…

  • usufruct (law)

    Usufruct, in Roman-based legal systems, the temporary right to the use and enjoyment of the property of another, without changing the character of the property. This legal concept developed in Roman law and found significant application in the determination of the property interests between a

  • usugai-hō (Japanese art)

    raden: In usugai-hō, a technique using thin shell, shell pieces are cut into designs by means of a knife or needle and are glued on after the surface has been given two coatings of lacquer. A third coating of lacquer is applied over the shell and then…

  • Usuki (Japan)

    Usuki, city, ōita ken (prefecture), Kyushu, Japan. The city faces Usuki Bay on the Bungo Channel between the Inland Sea and the Pacific Ocean. An early castle town, Usuki once carried on trade with Portugal. It is now a fishing port and commercial centre; the main industrial activity is brewing.

  • u?ūl al-fiqh (Islamic law)

    U?ūl al-fiqh, the sources of Islamic law and the discipline dedicated to elucidating them and their relationship to the substantive rulings of the law. The field of u?ūl al-fiqh encompasses theoretical discussions of the nature of the religious law, its relationship to reason and ethics, and its

  • usul-i jadid school (Islamic education)

    Tajikistan: Education: … reformist movement had installed its New Method schools received the rudiments of a modern, though still Muslim, education. The educational establishment was dominated until the 1920s by the standard network of Muslim maktabs and madrasahs, however. Soviet efforts eventually brought secular education to the entire population, and levels of Tajik…

  • U?ūliyyah (Islamic sect)

    Shi?i: Shi?i dynasties: …to the rise of the U?ūlīs, who argued that the senior ?ulamā? were designated representatives (nuwwāb, singular nā?ib) of the imam during his absence and were, therefore, entitled to assume the imam’s role in matters of the interpretation of doctrine and in carrying out the distinguishing practices of the community.…

  • Usulután (El Salvador)

    Usulután, city, southeastern El Salvador. It lies on the Pacific coastal plain at the southern foot of Usulután Volcano. The city’s name, which is Indian, means “city of the ocelots.” Usulután is a commercial centre dealing in the grain, coffee, sugarcane, fruit, and hardwood lumber produced in the

  • Usumacinta River (river, Mexico-Guatemala)

    Usumacinta River, river in southeastern Mexico and northwestern Guatemala, formed by the junction of the Pasión River, which arises in the Sierra de Santa Cruz (in Guatemala), and the Chixoy River, which descends from the Sierra Madre de Guatemala. The Usumacinta River flows northwestward,

  • Usuman dan Fodio (Fulani leader)

    Usman dan Fodio, Fulani mystic, philosopher, and revolutionary reformer who, in a jihad (holy war) between 1804 and 1808, created a new Muslim state, the Fulani empire, in what is now northern Nigeria. Usman was born in the Hausa state of Gobir, in what is now northwestern Nigeria. His father,

  • usurer

    anti-Semitism: Anti-Semitism in medieval Europe: …prominent in trade, banking, and moneylending, and Jews’ economic and cultural successes tended to arouse the envy of the populace. This economic resentment, allied with traditional religious prejudice, prompted the forced expulsion of Jews from several countries and regions, including England (1290), France (14th century), Germany (1350s), Portugal (1496), Provence…

  • usurpadores, Los (short stories by Ayala)

    Francisco Ayala: …a book of short stories, Los usurpadores (“The Usurpers”), in which he examines the innate immorality of one person subjugating another to his will. This theme is treated in the context of the history of Spain, and the finest story in the book—“El hechizado” (“The Bewitched”)—is a macabre story of…

  • usury (law)

    Usury, in modern law, the practice of charging an illegal rate of interest for the loan of money. In Old English law, the taking of any compensation whatsoever was termed usury. With the expansion of trade in the 13th century, however, the demand for credit increased, necessitating a modification

  • usus (marriage law)

    marriage law: …effectively marriage by purchase, while usus, the most informal variety, was marriage simply by mutual consent and evidence of extended cohabitation. Roman law generally placed the woman under the control of her husband and on the same footing as children. Under Roman law no slave could contract marriage with either…

  • usus (property law)

    Roman law: The law of property and possession: …the life of the holder, usus permitted merely the use of a thing; thus, a person could live in a house but could not let it, as that would be equivalent to “taking the fruits.”

  • ususfructus (Roman law)

    Roman law: The law of property and possession: Ususfructus was the right to use and take the fruits (such as crops) of a thing and corresponded to the modern notion of life interest. A more restricted right, likewise not extending beyond the life of the holder, usus permitted merely the use of a…

  • Usuthu (Zulu group)

    Cetshwayo: …Zulu group known as the Usuthu. During a Zulu civil war in 1856, Cetshwayo’s Usuthu force defeated his rival and brother Mbuyazwe’s Gqoza group in a violent encounter at the Battle of Ndondakasuka (near the lower Tugela River). After his victory, Cetshwayo was widely regarded as the de facto heir…

  • Usutu (river, Mozambique)

    Maputo River, river formed by the confluence in southwestern Mozambique of the Great Usutu River (flowing from Swaziland) and the Pongola River (flowing from South Africa). From the confluence it flows about 50 miles (80 km) northeastward to enter Delagoa Bay, 14 miles (23 km) south-southeast of t

  • USVBA (American organization)

    volleyball: History: …1928 the USVBA—now known as USA Volleyball (USAV)—has conducted annual national men’s and senior men’s (age 35 and older) volleyball championships, except during 1944 and 1945. Its women’s division was started in 1949, and a senior women’s division (age 30 and older) was added in 1977. Other national events in…

  • USW (American labour union)

    United Steelworkers (USW), American labour union representing workers in metallurgical industries as well as in healthcare and other service industries. The union grew out of an agreement reached in 1936 between the newly formed Committee for Industrial Organization (CIO; later the Congress of

  • uswah (Islam)

    Muhammad: Status in the Qur?ān and in post-Qur?ānic Islam: …Muhammad as an “exemplar” (uswah) to the believers (33:21). Such pronouncements form an important impetus for the later view that the “custom” (sunnah) of Muhammad holds normative significance for all Muslims and that in working out God’s commandments Islamic scholars are to rely on Prophetic precedent to supplement and…

  • USWB (United States agency)

    National Weather Service (NWS), official weather bureau of the United States, founded on February 9, 1870, and charged with providing weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its possessions, and its marine and freshwater approaches. Such weather forecasts and

  • USWNT (association football)

    Abby Wambach: She helped the U.S. Women’s National Team (USWNT) win two Olympic gold medals (2004 and 2012) and a World Cup (2015). In 2012 she was named Women’s Player of the Year by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).

  • USX Corporation (American corporation)

    USX Corporation, former American holding company that was incorporated in 1986 to oversee the operations formerly directed by the United States Steel Corporation. Its four independent operating units were USS (United States Steel Corporation), Marathon Oil, Texas Oil & Gas, and U.S. Diversified

  • Us?man ?Alī Khan, Mīr (ruler of Hyderābād)

    Osman Ali, nizam (ruler) of Hyderabad princely state in India in the period 1911–48 and its constitutional president until 1956. Once one of the richest men in the world, he ruled over a state the size of Italy. After a private education, Osman Ali succeeded his father, Ma?būb ?Alī Khan, the sixth

  • UT (chronology)

    Universal Time (UT), the mean solar time of the Greenwich meridian (0° longitude). Universal Time replaced the designation Greenwich Mean Time in 1928; it is now used to denote the solar time (q.v.) when an accuracy of about one second suffices. In 1955 the International Astronomical Union defined

  • Ut de Franzosentid (work by Reuter)

    Fritz Reuter: Ut de Franzosentid (1859; “During the Time of the French Conquest”) presents, with a mixture of seriousness and humour, life in a Mecklenburg country town during the War of Liberation against Napoleon. Ut mine Festungstid (1862; “During the Time of My Incarceration”) is an account…

  • Ut mine Festungstid (work by Reuter)

    Fritz Reuter: Ut mine Festungstid (1862; “During the Time of My Incarceration”) is an account of his last few years in prison told without bitterness. Ut mine Stromtid (1862–64; “During My Apprenticeship”) is considered his masterpiece. In this work, originally issued in three volumes, Reuter’s resemblance to…

  • Ut mine Stromtid (work by Reuter)

    Fritz Reuter: Ut mine Stromtid (1862–64; “During My Apprenticeship”) is considered his masterpiece. In this work, originally issued in three volumes, Reuter’s resemblance to Charles Dickens as a great storyteller and as a creator of characters is most apparent; its humorous hero, Entspektor Br?sig, is as memorable…

  • Ut queant laxis (hymn by Guido d’Arezzo)

    Guido d'Arezzo: John the Baptist, Ut queant laxis, in which the first syllable of each line falls on a different tone of the hexachord (the first six tones of the major scale); these syllables, ut, re, mi, fa, sol, and la, are used in Latin countries as the names of…

  • Ut unum sint (encyclical by John Paul II)

    St. John Paul II: Christian ecumenism: >Ut unum sint (1995; “That They May Be One”) reviewed 30 years of ecumenical relations, including his visits—the first by any pope—to Canterbury Cathedral and to Lutheran churches in Germany and Sweden. Its invitation to non-Catholic churches to join John Paul in rethinking the role…

  • Ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la (mass by Palestrina)

    Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina: Music: sacerdos magnus; L’Homme armé; Ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la; Ave Maria; Tu es Petrus; and Veni Creator Spiritus. These titles refer to the source of the particular cantus firmus. Palestrina’s mastery of contrapuntal ingenuity may be appreciated to the fullest extent in some of his canonic masses (in…

  • Uta (reptile genus)

    Uta, genus of New World lizards of the family Iguanidae. At least nine species of side-blotched lizards occur in the southwestern United States and adjacent regions of Mexico. The common side-blotched lizard, or ground uta (Uta stansburiana), is widespread in the western United States. Uta species

  • uta monogatari (poem tales)

    Japanese literature: Prose: …content and form to the uta monogatari (“poem tales”) that emerged as a literary genre later in the 10th century. Ise monogatari (c. 980; Tales of Ise) consists of 143 episodes, each containing one or more poems and an explanation in prose of the circumstances of composition. The brevity and…

  • Uta stansburiana

    Uta: The common side-blotched lizard, or ground uta (Uta stansburiana), is widespread in the western United States. Uta species range in length from 10 to 27 cm (4 to 11 inches). They are usually dull-coloured; the males of some species have a blue throat and abdomen. These lizards…

  • Utaemon VI, Nakamura (Japanese actor)

    Nakamura Utaemon VI, (Fujio Kawamura), Japanese actor (born Jan. 20, 1917, Tokyo, Japan—died March 31, 2001, Tokyo), was regarded as the preeminent performer of Japan’s traditional kabuki theatre during his lifetime. Born into a family of kabuki actors, Utaemon VI made his theatrical debut in 1

  • Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese artist)

    Hiroshige, Japanese artist, one of the last great ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) masters of the colour woodblock print. His genius for landscape compositions was first recognized in the West by the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists. His print series Fifty-three Stations of the

  • Utagawa Kunisada (Japanese artist)

    Utagawa Kunisada, Japanese artist who was probably the most prolific of all the painters and printmakers of the ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) movement. He was particularly known for his erotically decadent portraits of women, executed with a powerful, free style. Kunisada also excelled

  • Utagawa Kuniyoshi (Japanese artist)

    Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Japanese painter and printmaker of the ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) movement. Like his rival Utagawa Kunisada, Kuniyoshi was a pupil of Utagawa Toyokuni. He established his fame as the designer of musha-e (“warrior prints”) with his series of prints entitled Tsūzoku

  • Utagawa Toyohiro (Japanese artist)

    Hiroshige: …school of the ukiyo-e master Utagawa Toyohiro. Hiroshige is said to have first applied to the school of the more popular artist Utagawa Toyokuni, a confrere of Toyohiro. Had Hiroshige been accepted as a pupil by Toyokuni, he might well have ended his days as a second-rate imitator of that…

  • Utagawa Toyokuni (Japanese artist)

    Utagawa Toyokuni, Japanese artist of the ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) movement who developed the style of his master, Utagawa Toyoharu, making it one of the most popular of its day. Toyokuni specialized in prints of actors but was also known for his portraits of women. His “Yakusha

  • Utah (state, United States)

    Utah, constituent state of the United States of America. Mountains, high plateaus, and deserts form most of its landscape. The capital, Salt Lake City, is located in the north-central region of the state. The state lies in the heart of the West and is bounded by Idaho to the north, Wyoming to the

  • Utah Ballet (American ballet company)

    Willam Christensen: …it changed its name to Ballet West. Christensen retired as director a decade later and was succeeded by Bruce Marks. As a choreographer, Christensen created works to music by J.S. Bach, Felix Mendelssohn, Igor Stravinsky, Ludwig van Beethoven, and Darius Milhaud.

  • Utah Beach (World War II)

    Utah Beach, the westernmost beach of the five landing areas of the Normandy Invasion of World War II. It was assaulted on June 6, 1944 (D-Day of the invasion), by elements of the U.S. 4th Infantry Division and was taken with relatively few casualties. In the predawn hours of D-Day, units of the

  • Utah Jazz (American basketball team)

    Utah Jazz, American professional basketball team based in Salt Lake City, Utah, that plays in the Western Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Jazz have won two conference championships (1997 and 1998). Originally based in New Orleans, whose storied music history gave the

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