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  • Uzan, Cem Cengiz (Turkish businessman and politician)

    Cem Uzan, Turkish businessman and politician known for launching the first private television channel in Turkey and for his subsequent foray into politics. Uzan’s father had made his fortune in the construction industry. The Uzan family’s various business holdings grew extensively over the years

  • ?U?aym (river, Iraq)

    Tigris-Euphrates river system: Hydrology: …the Great Zab, Little Zab, ?U?aym, and Diyālā rivers, all of which derive their water mainly from snowmelt in Turkish, Iranian, and Iraqi Kurdistan. The precipitous flow of its tributaries makes the Tigris more susceptible than the Euphrates to short-term flooding, and its short length brings its annual flood period…

  • Uzbeck (Mongolian leader)

    ?z Beg, Mongol leader and khan of the Golden Horde, or Kipchak empire, of southern Russia, under whom it attained its greatest power; he reigned from 1312 to 1341. ?z Beg was a convert to Islām, but he also welcomed Christian missionaries from western Europe into his realm. ?z Beg encouraged the

  • Uzbek (Mongolian leader)

    ?z Beg, Mongol leader and khan of the Golden Horde, or Kipchak empire, of southern Russia, under whom it attained its greatest power; he reigned from 1312 to 1341. ?z Beg was a convert to Islām, but he also welcomed Christian missionaries from western Europe into his realm. ?z Beg encouraged the

  • Uzbek (people)

    Uzbek, any member of a Central Asian people found chiefly in Uzbekistan, but also in other parts of Central Asia and in Afghanistan. The Uzbeks speak either of two dialects of Uzbek, a Turkic language of the Altaic family of languages. More than 16 million Uzbeks live in Uzbekistan, 2,000,000 in

  • Uzbek khanate (historical state, Central Asia)

    Uzbek khanate, any of the three states that ruled Transoxania, in present-day Uzbekistan, before it came under Russian rule in the 19th century. The khanates of Bukhara and Khiva (Khwārezm) were established by two branches of the Shaybānid dynasty, which won control of Transoxania from the

  • Uzbek language

    Uzbek language, member of the Turkic language subfamily of the Altaic family, spoken in Uzbekistan, eastern Turkmenistan, northern and western Tajikistan, southern Kazakhstan, northern Afghanistan, and northwestern China. Uzbek belongs to the southeastern, or Chagatai, branch of the Turkic

  • Uzbek literature

    Uzbek literature, the body of written works produced by the Uzbek people of Central Asia, most of whom live in Uzbekistan, with smaller populations in Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. Although its roots stretch as far back as the 9th century, modern Uzbek literature traces its origins in

  • Uzbekistan

    Uzbekistan, country in Central Asia. It lies mainly between two major rivers, the Syr Darya (ancient Jaxartes River) to the northeast and the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) to the southwest, though they only partly form its boundaries. Uzbekistan is bordered by Kazakhstan to the northwest and

  • Uzbekistan, flag of

    horizontally striped blue-white-green national flag with red fimbriations (narrow borders) between the stripes. In the upper hoist corner are a white crescent and 12 white stars. The flag’s width-to-length ratio is 1 to 2.Uzbekistan legalized the design of its new national flag on November 18,

  • Uzbekistan, history of

    Uzbekistan: History: Humans lived in what is now Uzbekistan as early as the Paleolithic Period (Old Stone Age), some 55,000 to 70,000 years ago. The great states of Bactria, Khwārezm, and Sogdiana emerged during the 1st millennium bce in the fertile region around the

  • Uzbekistan, Republic of

    Uzbekistan, country in Central Asia. It lies mainly between two major rivers, the Syr Darya (ancient Jaxartes River) to the northeast and the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) to the southwest, though they only partly form its boundaries. Uzbekistan is bordered by Kazakhstan to the northwest and

  • ?zbekiston

    Uzbekistan, country in Central Asia. It lies mainly between two major rivers, the Syr Darya (ancient Jaxartes River) to the northeast and the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) to the southwest, though they only partly form its boundaries. Uzbekistan is bordered by Kazakhstan to the northwest and

  • ?zbekiston Respublikasi

    Uzbekistan, country in Central Asia. It lies mainly between two major rivers, the Syr Darya (ancient Jaxartes River) to the northeast and the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) to the southwest, though they only partly form its boundaries. Uzbekistan is bordered by Kazakhstan to the northwest and

  • Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

    Uzhhorod, city, western Ukraine. It is situated along the Uzh River just east of the Slovak border. For centuries Uzhhorod has been an important cultural, educational, religious, and economic centre of the Carpathian Mountains region. It was founded in the 8th or 9th century and has long had

  • Uzhgorod, Union of (1646, Transcarpathia)

    Eastern rite church: History: The Union of Uzhhorod (Uzhgorod) in 1646 brought many Ruthenians (or Rusyns) into the Roman Catholic Church when 63 Ruthenian Orthodox priests, who represented Ruthenians living under Catholic rule, accepted the authority of Rome while being allowed to maintain their liturgical language (Old Church Slavonic) and…

  • Uzhhorod (Ukraine)

    Uzhhorod, city, western Ukraine. It is situated along the Uzh River just east of the Slovak border. For centuries Uzhhorod has been an important cultural, educational, religious, and economic centre of the Carpathian Mountains region. It was founded in the 8th or 9th century and has long had

  • Uzhhorod, Union of (1646, Transcarpathia)

    Eastern rite church: History: The Union of Uzhhorod (Uzhgorod) in 1646 brought many Ruthenians (or Rusyns) into the Roman Catholic Church when 63 Ruthenian Orthodox priests, who represented Ruthenians living under Catholic rule, accepted the authority of Rome while being allowed to maintain their liturgical language (Old Church Slavonic) and…

  • U?horod (Ukraine)

    Uzhhorod, city, western Ukraine. It is situated along the Uzh River just east of the Slovak border. For centuries Uzhhorod has been an important cultural, educational, religious, and economic centre of the Carpathian Mountains region. It was founded in the 8th or 9th century and has long had

  • Uzi submachine gun

    Uzi submachine gun, compact automatic weapon that is used throughout the world as a police and special-forces firearm. The Uzi is named for its designer, Uziel Gal, an Israeli army officer who developed it after the Arab-Israeli war of 1948. Gal based his weapon partly on earlier Czech designs, in

  • U?ice (Serbia)

    U?ice, town, southwestern Serbia. It lies along the Djetinja River and the Sarajevo-?a?ak-Belgrade railway line. A medieval town of strategic importance, U?ice was the headquarters for the Partisan army in autumn 1941. It was renamed in honour of Josip Broz Tito in 1946 but reverted to its old name

  • Uzina (pagoda, Mawlamyine, Myanmar)

    Mawlamyine: …renowned for its view, and Uzina, with life-sized figures representing the four events that influenced the Buddha to become a hermit. The city lies in an area that has a sizable Mon population.

  • Uzun ?asan (Turkmen ruler)

    Uzun ?asan, ruler (1453–78) of the Turkmen Ak Koyunlu dynasty who created a short-lived empire in Iran, Iraq, eastern Anatolia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan. With the death of Kara Osman, founder of the Ak Koyunlu dynasty, in 1435, a civil war ensued among his descendants. By 1453 Uzun ?asan had emerged

  • ?Uzzā, al- (Arabian deity)

    al-Lāt: …goddesses, Manāt (Fate) and al-?Uzzā (Strong), were associated with al-Lāt in the Qur?ān (Islāmic sacred scriptures). The Prophet Mu?ammad once recognized these three as goddesses, but a new revelation led him to abrogate the approving verses he had earlier recited and to abandon his attempt to placate Meccan pagans.…

  • Uzziah (king of Judah)

    Uzziah, in the Old Testament (2 Chronicles 26), son and successor of Amaziah, and king of Judah for 52 years (c. 791–739 bc). Assyrian records indicate that Uzziah reigned for 42 years (c. 783–742). His reign marked the height of Judah’s power. He fought successfully against other nations and

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